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'Samsung' Articles

China's BOE Considered 'Strong Contender' for OLED Display Orders for Future iPhones, Joining Samsung

An escalating trade war between Japan and South Korea could make Chinese manufacturer BOE Technology a "strong contender" for OLED display orders from Apple, according to industry sources who spoke with DigiTimes. Samsung has been the undisputed leader in OLED display manufacturing, and as a result it has reportedly been the exclusive supplier of OLED displays for the iPhone X, iPhone XS, and iPhone XS Max, but the industry sources cited believe the Japanese-Korean trade row could upend its monopoly position. Apple aims to diversify its supply chain as much as possible, often securing at least two suppliers for any given component, but Samsung's lead in OLED display manufacturing has left it with few alternatives so far. LG, for example, reportedly temporarily halted one of its OLED display production lines due to manufacturing challenges earlier this year. LG already supplies OLED displays for the Apple Watch and is widely expected to become a secondary supplier of OLED displays for iPhones when capable to. With at least one of BOE or LG joining the mix, Apple is poised to reduce its supply chain risk and improve its negotiating position. Update: In related news, representatives from tech giants including Apple have traveled to South Korea to measure the impact of the trade war between Japan and South Korea, according to The Korea Herald. The tech giants are said to be "especially worried" about the possible impact on Samsung's DRAM

Samsung's Galaxy Note 10 Revealed in First 'Official' Leaked Images

The first official photos of Samsung's flagship Galaxy Note 10 device appear to have been leaked onto the web, courtesy of MySmartPrice's Ishan Agarwal. After the Galaxy S10 and S10+, the Galaxy Note line is Samsung's larger smartphone equipped with a stylus. The Note 10's unveiling will come on August 7, so about a month ahead of when we're expecting to see Apple's 2019 iPhone lineup. The image shown above reveals the Galaxy Note 10 will come in a pearlescent silvery-blue color, while a second leaked image reveals an additional black version will also be available. Otherwise, as per previous rumors, the Galaxy Note 10 adopts the same curved-screen, glass-body design used in previous Note devices, but the front now features an edge-to-edge display with a single center hole punch camera. Over on the back of the device we can see a triple-camera array. This suggests either that rumors of a quad-camera setup – including a fourth time-of-flight (ToF) 3D depth camera – are wide of the mark, or that what we're looking at is the smaller 6.28-inch model, as claimed by WinFuture's Roland Quandt. Samsung is said to be releasing a second, larger 6.75-inch Note 10 next month. If that model does include the quad-camera array with ToF, the company will be debuting the world-facing 3D depth-sensing tech a full year in advance of Apple, which is rumored to be introducing it in its 2020 iPhone line-up. If the bigger device additionally features 5G support (also rumored), that will be two tech flags that Samsung can raise at least one year ahead of Apple. There's no

Apple Reimbursed Samsung $683 Million After Missing OLED Display Targets

Apple reimbursed Samsung 800 billion won ($683 million) to cover the cost of OLED panels after Apple missed a sales target both companies had agreed upon. Apple originally said it would buy a certain number of the display panels from the South Korean company, but disappointing iPhone sales meant it was unable to live up to the agreement. The payment was made in the second quarter of this year. The figure, quoted by Reuters, came as Samsung on Friday forecast a plunge in its second-quarter operating profits, but one-off gains like the payment from Apple helped it beat analyst expectations. Samsung's April-June operating profit likely fell 56 percent to 6.5 trillion won ($5.6 billion), the company revealed in a regulatory filing ahead of the release of its detailed earnings figures in late July. Revenue probably fell 4.2 percent from a year earlier to 56 trillion won ($48 billion). Samsung is on track to post year-on-year profit declines for a third consecutive quarter, mainly due to a combination of falling chip prices because of a supply glut and U.S. sanctions on Chinese telecom equipment maker Huawei, which has become a key Samsung client. The U.S.-China trade war is also impacting global chip and smartphone markets, with rising tariffs hitting demand for electronics. In a striking example of the ongoing feud between the two countries, Seoul also cut its annual economic growth target to a seven-year low as exports continued to

Samsung Sued by Australian Consumer Watchdog for 'Misleading' Galaxy Phone Water Resistance Ads

Samsung is in hot water with Australia's consumer watchdog for allegedly misleading consumers about the level of water resistance its Galaxy smartphones offer. Samsung Galaxy advertisement Reuters reports that the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) is suing the South Korean firm for falsely representing its Galaxy phones as suitable for use underwater, following ads that show the devices being submerged in swimming pools and used in ocean water. Samsung did not know or sufficiently test the effects of pool or saltwater exposure on its phones when ads showed them fully submerged, claims the ACCC lawsuit. "The ACCC alleges Samsung's advertisements falsely and misleadingly represented Galaxy phones would be suitable for use in, or for exposure to, all types of water, including in ocean water and swimming pools, and would not be affected by such exposure to water for the life of the phone, when this was not the case," ACCC Chairman Rod Sims said in a statement.Samsung Galaxy phones are marketed as having IP68 water resistance, defined as resistant to water 1.5 meters deep for 30 minutes. The ACCC's point is the IP68 rating doesn't cover all types of water. However, Samsung told Reuters it stood by its advertising, complied with Australian law, and would defend the case. The smartphone maker has invested heavily in advertising to rebuild its reputation in the public eye, following its 2016 global recall of fire-prone Galaxy Note 7

Samsung Completes Redesign of Galaxy Fold That Fixes Screen Failures

Samsung has completed its redesign of the Galaxy Fold to resolve the multiple display failures that led to its delay, Bloomberg reported on Tuesday. According to the publication, the smartphone maker is now in the "final stages" of producing a version that's ready for the consumer market, but it's still unable to give a firm launch date. The South Korean company originally planned to roll out its $1,980 foldable phone on April 26, but was forced to delay the launch after several units sent out to reviewers broke during testing. All of the issues were related to the device's screen, which was later shown to be vulnerable to debris ingress, thanks to an iFixit teardown that was later removed at Samsung's request. The company has reportedly fixed these problems, according to people familiar with the matter who spoke to Bloomberg. It has now stretched the protective film to wrap around the entire screen and flow into the outer bezels so it would be impossible to peel off by hand, said the people, who have seen the latest versions. It re-engineered the hinge, pushing it slightly upward from the screen (it’s now flush with the display) to help stretch the film further when the phone opens. That tension makes the film feel harder and more a natural part of the device rather than a detachable accessory, they added. The consequent protrusion, almost imperceptible to the naked eye, may help reduce the chance of a crease developing in the middle of the screen over time, one of the people said.Samsung on Monday announced plans to hold an event on Wednesday, August

Samsung to Hold Event on August 7 to Unveil Galaxy Note 10

Samsung yesterday announced plans to hold an event on Wednesday, August 7 in New York City, where it will unveil the next-generation Galaxy Note device. Samsung splits its smartphone unveilings into two events each year, and in February unveiled its Galaxy S10 and Galaxy S10+. The Galaxy Note line is Samsung's larger smartphone equipped with a stylus, and the Note 10's unveiling will come just about a month ahead of when we're expecting to see Apple's 2019 iPhone lineup. There were no details provided about the upcoming device, but Samsung says it is going to "unveil new devices designed to take the Galaxy ecosystem's connectivity to the next level." The event's invite features an S-Pen and a camera lens. Rumors and leaked design renders suggest the Galaxy Note 10 will feature 6.28 and 6.75-inch glass bodies (two sizes are rumored) with the same boxy design used in previous note devices. The front is said to feature an edge-to-edge display with a single center hole punch camera while the back is said to include a quad-camera setup. There are three traditional cameras (12-megapixel wide-angle, 12-megapixel ultra wide-angle, and 12-megapixel telephoto) along with a fourth time-of-flight 3D depth camera, which is a feature that rumors have indicated Apple will bring to the iPhone in 2020. It's also supposed to include an under-display fingerprint sensor like the Galaxy S10, and 5G variants may be offered as well. Samsung may also use its upcoming August event to provide more detail on when we can expect the delayed Galaxy Fold to launch. Samsung planned to

Apple Reportedly in Talks With Samsung About OLED Displays for Future iPads and MacBooks

Samsung is the exclusive supplier of OLED displays for the iPhone X and newer, as part of a supply agreement with Apple. Due to fewer iPhone sales than anticipated in recent quarters, however, Apple has reportedly ordered fewer OLED displays from Samsung than both companies initially expected. Due to the shortfall, Korea's ETNews reports that Apple now owes Samsung a penalty in the amount of hundreds of millions of dollars. Instead of paying cash, however, the report claims Apple has offered multiple options, including committing to OLED display orders for future products like "tablets and notebooks." This aligns with a recent report from Korean site The Elec that claimed Samsung is in talks with Apple about supplying OLED displays for an all-new 16-inch MacBook Pro and future iPad Pro models. MacRumors mockup of 16-inch MacBook Pro We first heard about a potential 16-inch to 16.5-inch MacBook Pro from well-known analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who said the notebook will launch at some point in 2019 with an "all-new design," but he did not comment on which display technology the notebook will use or share any other details. Kuo has also previously claimed that two new iPad Pro models will enter mass production between the fourth quarter of 2019 and the first quarter of 2020, but again, he did not say which display technology the tablets will use. Beyond that, Kuo expects Apple to launch several new products with Mini-LED backlights over the next two years, including a 10-inch to 12-inch iPad in late 2020 or early 2021 and a 15-inch to 17-inch MacBook in the first

Samsung Rumored to Supply OLED Displays for 16-Inch MacBook Pro and Future iPad Pros

Samsung is in talks with Apple about supplying OLED displays for a 16-inch MacBook Pro and future iPad Pro models, according to Korean site The Elec, which does not have a proven track record in terms of Apple rumors. We first heard about a potential 16-inch to 16.5-inch MacBook Pro from well-known analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who said the notebook will launch at some point in 2019 with an "all-new design," but he did not comment on which display technology the notebook will use or share any other details. Kuo later said Apple is planning to release a new 15-inch to 17-inch MacBook Pro with a mini-LED backlight in the first half of 2021. It is unclear if this will be a future iteration of the 16-inch MacBook Pro or exactly how Apple's plans will play out. Kuo has also previously claimed that two new iPad Pro models will enter mass production between the fourth quarter of 2019 and the first quarter of 2020, but again, he has not commented on what display technology the tablets would use. He also expects a new iPad with a mini-LED backlight in late 2020 to early 2021. Little else is known about the rumored 16-inch MacBook Pro or new iPad Pro models at this time. Apple surprised us earlier this week with new 2019 MacBook Pro models, but the only changes are faster processors and a "new material" added to the keyboard for improved reliability — hopefully, at least. Given this week's MacBook Pro refresh, it is reasonable to assume that Apple will not release the rumored 16-inch MacBook

How AirPlay 2 and the Apple TV App Work on a Samsung TV

When iOS 12.3 and tvOS 12.3 launched earlier this week with the updated TV app that Apple first teased at its March event, Samsung also rolled out support for both AirPlay 2 and the new TV app, making it the first third-party company to launch these features. We have a Samsung TV set (the 2018 Q6F) that's compatible with the new Apple offerings, so we thought we'd check them out to give MacRumors readers a look at how Apple features work on third-party television sets. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. After installing a firmware update, Apple-compatible Samsung TV sets will have an Apple TV app, which is going to be unique to Samsung TVs for the foreseeable future. Other TV sets are gaining Apple features like AirPlay 2, but it's only Samsung that has a TV app option for now. The TV app on a Samsung TV looks almost identical to the TV app on the Apple TV, offering up a "Watch Now" feature that keeps track of the movies and the TV shows you're watching, plus content recommendations ranging from suggestions based on what you've watched to new content to trending content. The "Channels" feature that's new to the TV app is available on Samsung TVs, allowing users to subscribe to services like HBO, Starz, Showtime, and more right within the TV app. Channels content can be watched right within the TV app without the need to open up another app. There are dedicated sections for "Watch Now," Movies, TV Shows, Kids, Library, Search, and Settings, and the app offers up access to all of the iTunes content that

iPhone XS Max Signal Strength Compared to OnePlus 7 Pro and Samsung Galaxy S10

The Samsung Galaxy S10 and the new OnePlus 7 Pro are both flagship smartphones that are designed to compete with the iPhone XS Max, and to see how their LTE chips compare, PCMag teamed up with Cellular Insights to test the signal strength of the new devices. Apple's iPhone XS Max is equipped with an XMM7560 modem chip from Intel, while the Galaxy S10 and the OnePlus 7 Pro are using Qualcomm's X24 modem, which theoretically offers better performance. iPhone XS Max in blue, OnePlus 7 Pro in orange, Samsung Galaxy S10 in gray, and LG V40 in yellow The Intel XMM7560 modem in the iPhone XS Max supports supports 5-carrier aggregation but offers 1Gb/s maximum theoretical data transfer speeds, while the Qualcomm X24 in the Galaxy S10 has max theoretical speeds of 2Gb/s (it uses 7-carrier aggregation) and the OnePlus 7 Pro has max theoretical speeds of 1.2Gb/s (lower because it uses 5-carrier aggregation like the iPhone). In testing on LTE band 4 with good signal, there wasn't a lot of difference in performance between the iPhone XS Max, the newer smartphones from Samsung and OnePlus, and the LG V40, which PCMag added in because it was 2018's best performing phone in terms of cellular speed. All of the smartphones performed similarly, but the Samsung Galaxy S10 did see some of the slowest speeds, and at peak signal, the iPhone XS came in behind the OnePlus 7 Pro and the LG V40. In a test with poorer LTE signal, the iPhone XS Max saw the slowest speeds and was outperformed by all of

AirPlay 2 and TV App Now Available on Samsung Smart TVs

With the launch of iOS 12.3, both AirPlay 2 and the new Apple TV app are available on compatible Smart TVs, Samsung announced today. All 2019 Samsung Smart TVs and select 2018 TV models with a firmware update will be able to access Apple TV channels and iTunes movies and TV shows through the TV app and will support AirPlay 2. Samsung says that the TV app offers content in more than 100 countries, while AirPlay 2 is available in 176 countries. On compatible Samsung TVs with the Smart TV platform, users are able to select the Apple TV app icon to access their Apple content. With the Channels feature in the Apple TV app, Samsung users can subscribe to services like HBO, Showtime, Starz, and more, and watch content from those services directly in the Apple TV app. Samsung users will also have access to more than 100,000 TV shows and movies to buy or rent from iTunes, including content that's available in 4K HDR."For the last decade, Samsung has been at the forefront of offering the broadest selection of content available to consumers on our Smart TV platform," said Won-Jin Lee, Executive Vice President, Visual Display Business at Samsung Electronics. "As the first TV manufacturer to integrate the Apple TV app on a Smart TV platform, Samsung continues to offer our customers incredible value and access to the Apple TV app experience on the largest screens available today."The TV app available on Samsung Smart TVs will allow Apple customers who are already in

Samsung Still Has No Idea When the Galaxy Fold Will Launch

Samsung on Tuesday acknowledged that it is unable to provide a firm release date for its Galaxy Fold smartphone and has contacted pre-order customers in the United States to apologize for the delay (via Reuters). "If we do not hear from you and we have not shipped by May 31st, your order will be canceled automatically," the South Korean tech giant's U.S. subsidiary told Galaxy Fold pre-order customers in an email late on Monday, which was confirmed by a Samsung spokeswoman.In a statement given to Reuters, Samsung said that U.S. regulations required the company to notify customers that pre-orders would be canceled if the product did not ship by May 31. The South Korean company originally planned to roll out its $1,980 foldable phone on April 26, but was forced to delay the launch after several units sent out to reviewers broke during testing. After recalling the review units, Samsung contacted pre-order customers on April 22, saying it would announce a new release date "in the coming weeks" and would take measures to strengthen the display protection. The device's screen was shown to be vulnerable to debris ingress, thanks to an iFixit teardown that was later removed at Samsung's request. The development is the latest in a series of embarrassing events for Samsung, whose hybrid tablet/smartphone was supposed to demonstrate the company leading innovation in the mobile space. Still, at least the device in its current state won't get into the hands of thousands of customers around the world, which would likely have turned into a larger problem. Samsung has

iFixit Removes Galaxy Fold Teardown at Samsung's Request

iFixit has decided to pull its revealing Samsung Galaxy Fold teardown. The decision is said to have been made after Samsung indirectly requested its removal from the website, which published the teardown on Wednesday. iFixit provided the following statement on its blog: We were provided our Galaxy Fold unit by a trusted partner. Samsung has requested, through that partner, that iFixit remove its teardown. We are under no obligation to remove our analysis, legal or otherwise. But out of respect for this partner, whom we consider an ally in making devices more repairable, we are choosing to withdraw our story until we can purchase a Galaxy Fold at retail.It's unclear why Samsung wanted the teardown removed, but a few possibilities come to mind. Perhaps the company intends to make significant changes to the design of the Galaxy Fold before it's officially launched, and it doesn't want a teardown on the web of a device that's substantially different to the one that eventually goes to market. Or maybe it was simply taking action against a partner that hadn't been given the authority to provide the device to iFixit in the first place. Another interpretation, offered by The Verge's Dieter Bohn, is that Samsung didn't appreciate the bad press that came with the teardown, after it exposed the design flaw allowing debris to ingress behind the display, which presumably caused so many review units to break, and led Samsung to recall them and then delay the device's launch. Whatever the reason, it doesn't look terribly good for the company. Samsung has yet to offer a new

iFixit Teardown of Samsung Galaxy Fold Reveals Likely Design Flaw

iFixit today published its teardown of Samsung's Galaxy Fold, offering more details on a potential flaw in the device, which has now been delayed following reports of several broken review units. Essentially, it looks as though Samsung was so focused on perfecting the folding mechanism on the smartphone/tablet hybrid that it made a major oversight: providing adequate protection against the ingress of debris between the OLED screen and the chassis bezel. To achieve the fold, the thin bezel that surrounds (and protects) the screen leaves a gap where the two halves meet... This 7 mm gap doesn't seem like a huge deal, but it leaves the display exposed—so should something accidentally enter, it's curtains for the screen. (Oops.) When closed, the screen is protected—but the spine is flanked by massive gaps that our opening picks hop right into. These gaps are less likely to cause immediate screen damage, but will definitely attract dirt.Many reviewers experienced multiple issues while testing the device, including a random bulge appearing on the display, as well as flickering and failing screens. In many cases, the issues were enough to make the $1,980 device completely unusable. In a statement, Samsung said its initial findings from the inspection of reported issues on the display showed that they could be associated with impact on the top and bottom exposed areas of the hinge. It also said "substances" were found inside the device, which affected the display performance. As iFixit notes, it will be interesting to see how folding designs manage to overcome these

Samsung Retrieving Defective Galaxy Fold Review Units as it Works to Fix Display Issues Before Launch

One day after Samsung said it was delaying the public launch of the Galaxy Fold smartphone, the company has now announced that it will be retrieving all Galaxy Fold devices that were distributed to reviewers (via Reuters). For many reviewers, the Galaxy Fold proved to be an unreliable smartphone as the display experienced multiple issues while being tested. These issues included a random bulge appearing on the display, as well as flickering and failing screens. In many cases, the issues were enough to make the Galaxy Fold devices completely unusable. Now, Samsung will retrieve these units and prepare for the re-launch of the smartphone at an unspecified date in the future. The Galaxy Fold was originally set to launch on April 26. “On the bright side, we have an opportunity to nail down this issue and fix it before selling the phones to a massive audience, so they won’t have same complaints,” said a Samsung employee, speaking on condition of anonymity. In a few cases, reviewers removed a protective layer on the smartphone's screen that looked similar to plastic films that are meant to be peeled off of displays after you open a device. For the Galaxy Fold, this layer is not meant to be removed, leading to some of the display issues. Still, not every reviewer with a broken Galaxy Fold removed the plastic film, suggesting that there are multiple issues with the device that Samsung will have to address before a wide launch to the public. In an email to pre-order customers about the delayed launch, Samsung said that it will update customers with more specific shipping

Galaxy Fold Launch Delayed as Samsung Commits to 'Strengthen the Display Protection' [Updated]

The Wall Street Journal reports that Samsung has delayed its launch of the Galaxy Fold until "at least next month" after multiple review units experienced sudden display failures while being tested by the media last week. Todd Haselton/CNBC Samsung initially said it remained committed to launching the Galaxy Fold on April 26, but the rollout is now expected in the "coming weeks." The company has yet to confirm the delay, but it wouldn't be surprising given that at least some of the folding smartphones appear to have a serious hardware issue. Galaxy Fold launch events in Hong Kong and Shanghai have already been postponed, according to Engadget's Richard Lai. Samsung earlier confirmed that it would "thoroughly inspect" the affected devices to determine the cause, but it has yet to provide an explanation. Samsung also cautioned that removing the protective layer on the display could cause damage, but some displays failed even with the protective layer in place. The delay would be an embarrassing mishap for a smartphone that starts at $1,980, but the right move before the Galaxy Fold gets into the hands of thousands of customers around the world and potentially turned into a larger problem. Update: Samsung has confirmed the delay in a statement provided to CNBC, noting that it will announce a new release date "in the coming weeks" and "will take measures to strengthen the display protection."We recently unveiled a completely new mobile category: a smartphone using multiple new technologies and materials to create a display that is flexible enough to fold. We

Multiple Reviewers Facing Broken Galaxy Fold Devices After Just Days of Use

Samsung this week provided reviewers with Galaxy Fold devices for some hands-on time, and it appears the folding smartphone may be suffering from some serious flaws. Three of the reviewers who received a Galaxy Fold have already experienced failures, all of which focus on the display. The Verge's Dieter Bohn says that his Galaxy Fold device broke after a random bulge appeared on the display, perhaps from a piece of debris that had gotten into the hinge. The debris, or whatever the bulge was, pressed into the display hard enough to break it. Broken Galaxy Fold OLED display via The Verge Bohn says that he did not mistreat the phone, doing "normal phone stuff" like putting it in a pocket and opening and closing the hinge.It's a distressing thing to discover just two days after receiving my review unit. More distressing is that the bulge eventually pressed sharply enough into the screen to break it. You can see the telltale lines of a broken OLED converging on the spot where the bulge is.Similarly, CNBC's Steve Kovach shared a video of his review unit displaying a flickering, failing screen after just a single day of use. After one day of use... pic.twitter.com/VjDlJI45C9— Steve Kovach (@stevekovach) April 17, 2019 Bloomberg's Mark Gurman also ran into a catastrophic display failure. His Galaxy Fold is broken and unusable, appearing to feature some of the same screen failures as Kovach's unit. The screen on my Galaxy Fold review unit is completely broken and unusable just two days in. Hard to know if this is widespread or not. pic.twitter.com/G0OHj3DQHw— Mark

Samsung's More Affordable Galaxy S10e Compared to iPhone XR

In the 2018 iPhone lineup, Apple introduced the iPhone XR, an iPhone that shares many of the same hardware advancements added in the XS and XS Max, but at a more affordable $749 price tag. Samsung followed in Apple's footsteps with its own 2019 Galaxy smartphone lineup, introducing the Galaxy S10e alongside the S10 and S10+ with a smaller screen size and a cheaper $749 price point that's meant to compete with Apple's iPhone XR. In our latest YouTube video, we compare Samsung's affordable smartphone option to Apple's. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Samsung's Galaxy S10e features a 5.8-inch 2280 x 1080 OLED display, while Apple's iPhone XR uses a 6.1-inch 1792 x 828 LCD display that Apple calls "Liquid Retina" because it's the company's best LCD to date. Samsung's OLED display is bright, crisp, vibrant, and a close match to the display used in its higher-end smartphones. Apple's display doesn't look bad, but it can't quite match the quality of OLED. When it comes to cutouts, the iPhone XR uses the same notch as the iPhone XS and XS Max because it has the same Face ID facial recognition system, while the Galaxy S10e uses a unique hole-punch cutout for the front-facing camera that maximizes available screen real estate. Samsung can't match Apple's facial recognition capabilities, so the Galaxy S10e features a fingerprint sensor built into the power button on the right side of the device. That's a deviation from other S10 devices that have an under-display ultrasonic fingerprint sensor.

Camera Comparison: iPhone XS Max vs. Samsung Galaxy S10+

Earlier this week, we asked our readers on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram to look at some photos taken with the iPhone XS Max and the Samsung Galaxy S10+, Samsung's new flagship device, and tell us which photos they liked best. There was a catch, though. We didn't tell them which smartphone took which photo, allowing us to aggregate some unbiased opinions on the quality of the images from each device. Today, we're revealing which photos came from which phone and sharing the results we gathered. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. All of the photos that we shared came straight from the camera and were not edited or otherwise manipulated. We'll go through each image and give a brief overview of what people thought before unveiling which camera was used for these images. View this post on Instagram #SamsungGalaxyS10Plus vs #iPhoneXSMax photos. Can you tell which is which? Results in our YouTube video on Friday. A post shared by MacRumors (@macrumorscom) on Mar 6, 2019 at 4:58pm PST The first photo, of a cup, shows off the iPhone's Portrait Mode and Samsung's Live Focus mode, which is basically the same thing. Photo A has more natural colors because Photo B is too warm, but B wins when it comes to depth. Photo A cut off part of the cup, while Photo B did not, though Photo A offered better blurring of background images. Most people actually preferred Photo A, but we think Photo B is the winner because it didn't cut off any of the cup. The second photo, featuring a person, was also captured with portrait mode.

Samsung to Preinstall Spotify on New Smartphones, Including Galaxy S10

Spotify today announced that its streaming music service will be preinstalled on the latest Samsung smartphones starting today, including the Galaxy S10, S10+, S10e, S10 5G, Galaxy Fold, and select Galaxy A models. New subscribers on those devices can receive a free six-month Spotify Premium trial in the United States. The announcement reflects a major extension of a partnership that saw Spotify become Samsung's go-to music service provider in August 2018, a move intended to provide a seamless listening experience across Samsung devices. Spotify being preinstalled on millions of Samsung smartphones brings it more in line with Apple Music, preinstalled on hundreds of millions of iOS devices. Last month, Spotify announced that it had 96 million paid subscribers as of the end of 2018, easily topping Apple Music's over 50 million subscribers. We recently put together an Apple Music vs. Spotify guide that compares the two streaming music