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'Nintendo' Articles

Nintendo Asks Developer Partners to Cut Back on In-App Purchases for Fear of Tarnishing the Brand

Nearly four years to the day since Nintendo announced it would be bringing its popular characters to iPhone and iPad, the company is now fearing how app-based microtransactions could be tarnishing its brand. According to a report by The Wall Street Journal, Nintendo is going so far as to ask its developer partners to "adjust" its games so that players don't spend too much on in-app purchases. One Nintendo official reiterated that the company uses its smartphone games to entice players into purchasing full-fledged console titles. Now, according to the unnamed official, Nintendo is concerned that it could be criticized for being greedy in the smartphone gaming market, ultimately hurting the company across divisions. As for individual games, Nintendo's plan is already affecting certain titles. Dragalia Lost developer CyberAgent slashed its fiscal year earnings forecast for the first time in 17 years, reportedly due in part to the game's underperformance. Although it has a lot of players downloading and interacting with the app, "revenue from each player has fallen short of projections," seemingly tied to Nintendo's new strategy. “Nintendo is not interested in making a large amount of revenue from a single smartphone game,” one CyberAgent official said. “If we managed the game alone, we would have made a lot more.” For DeNA, the original smartphone developer partner with Nintendo, the mobile gaming business is said to be in a "slump." Chief Executive Isao Moriyasu reported last month that many of the company's mobile games were struggling except for an original title

Nintendo's 'Fire Emblem Heroes' Crosses $500M in Player Spending on Two-Year Anniversary

Further cementing its status as Nintendo's most successful mobile game to date, Fire Emblem Heroes has officially crossed the half-a-billion-dollar revenue mark, which it hit just after the two-year anniversary of its launch in early February 2017. The game's $500 million in player spending includes players on both iOS and Android (via Sensor Tower). Fire Emblem Heroes is a free-to-play game that lets players spend real money inside the app once they download it. Most of Nintendo's apps have followed this structure, except Super Mario Run, which requires players to pay $9.99 to see the full game. In total, Fire Emblem Heroes has brought in "more than seven times the revenue" of Super Mario Run, and grossed more than twice the combined earnings of all of Nintendo's other mobile games, according to Sensor Tower. To date these include Miitomo (now defunct), Super Mario Run, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and Dragalia Lost. Released just last September, Dragalia Lost has already become Nintendo's second most lucrative mobile game, surpassing Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp and Super Mario Run. In terms of platforms for Fire Emblem Heroes, players on Google Play/Android accounted for the majority of spending at 54 percent, while the iOS App Store made up 46 percent of player spending. Most players are located in Japan, which accounted for 56 percent of the game's $500 million total, while the United States is the game's second largest market at 31 percent of player spending. Despite Super Mario Run performing poorly in comparison to the free-to-play games, Shigeru

Nintendo's Next Mobile Game Will Be 'Dr. Mario World,' Developed in Partnership With LINE

Nintendo today announced that its next iOS and Android release will be Dr. Mario World, an action puzzle game set to be released later in 2019. Nintendo will be partnering with messaging app LINE to develop the new title. Little detail is available on the new game at this time, but Dr. Mario was a 1990 puzzle game that tasked players with rearranging different colored pills as they fall to clear them off of the game board and eliminate viruses. The gameplay of the original title was similar to Tetris, and it should translate well to mobile devices. Nintendo says that Dr. Mario World will be free to play with in-app purchases, with Nintendo aiming to release the game in “early summer 2019” in Japan, the United States, and dozens of other countries. Dr. Mario World may be Nintendo's first game of 2019, as its other title, Mario Kart Tour, won't be coming out until the summer. It was originally scheduled to launch right around March. Nintendo has released five mobile games thus far, four of which have been free-to-play and three of which have been highly successful. Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and Dragalia Lost are current free-to-play titles, while Miitomo, Nintendo's first mobile game, is now defunct. Nintendo's only paid app so far has been Super Mario

Nintendo Delays Launch of 'Mario Kart Tour' Mobile Game Until Summer

Nintendo has announced that its upcoming Mario Kart Tour game for iOS devices won't be ready until the summer (via The Verge). The news came in Nintendo's quarterly earnings report released today, exactly a year since the company first revealed it was bringing the game to smartphones. Little is known about Mario Kart Tour, but the game was originally scheduled for launch before the company's fiscal year ending March 2019. Nintendo said the decision to delay it had been made "in order to improve the quality of the application and expand the content offerings after launch." When it eventually arrives, Mario Kart Tour is expected to use the same free-to-play model of other Nintendo mobile titles, with in-app purchases that help players with certain tasks. Out of Nintendo's five mobile games so far, four have followed this model (Miitomo, Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, Draglia Lost). Only Super Mario Run has used the pay-once price

Nintendo's Mobile Games Earned $348 Million in 2018

Nintendo earned approximately $348 million from its iOS and Android apps in 2018, according to new estimates shared this week by analytics firm Sensor Tower. Player spending hit a new record of $117 million during the fourth quarter of 2018, a 47 percent increase over the fourth quarter of 2017. Overall, Nintendo increased its earnings 15 percent compared to 2017. Much of the money that Nintendo earned came from Fire Emblem Heroes, its most popular title. Fire Emblem Heroes accounted for approximately 66 percent of Nintendo's 2018 revenue, with more than $230 million spent in the game across the globe. Since its debut, Fire Emblem Heroes has earned more than $487 million. Though it is Nintendo's newest game, Dragalia Lost brought in an estimated $58.4 million worldwide, while Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, which turned a year old in November, earned Nintendo $48.6 million during 2018. Nintendo's original mobile game and first paid title, Super Mario Run, brought in just $10 million in 2018, down from $31 million in 2017. In 2019, Nintendo plans to expand its portfolio of mobile titles with the launch of Mario Kart Tour, set to be released in March. Like Fire Emblem Heroes, Dragalia Lost, and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, Mario Kart Tour will be free to play and supported through in-app

Nintendo Planning Major Update for Fire Emblem Heroes and 'Broadening the Scope' of Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp

Nintendo this week held its financial results briefing aimed at the second quarter for the fiscal year ending in March 2019 (via Reuters), during which it discussed its smart device business and major updates coming to two of its iOS apps: Fire Emblem Heroes and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp. Starting with Fire Emblem Heroes, Nintendo's director and president Shuntaro Furukawa said that the company is planning a major version 3.0 update to the iOS game that will arrive around the end of 2018. The president didn't divulge any more information on the update, but ensured that Nintendo will keep pouring effort into development and operation of Fire Emblem Heroes following its huge success on the iOS App Store. According to Furukawa, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp will also be updated in the near future, but this one will be focused on "broadening the scope of the gameplay." The iOS game is a pared-down version of the full games found on consoles like Nintendo 3DS, DS, Wii, and GameCube, and focuses on a small campsite that players can redecorate and customize to their liking, with a few other mini locations that can be visited through an in-game map. Although details are still scarce, it sounds like Nintendo is planning to slightly expand the explorable area of the game with the update, and potentially add in new gameplay features. The company has consistently held new seasonal events and introduced new features -- like gardening -- over the past year, but its scope has largely stayed the same as when it first launched. It's doubtful that this means Animal

Nintendo's New Dragalia Lost Game Earned $16 Million in Two Weeks

In the two weeks following the launch of Dragalia Lost, Nintendo's newest title, the game has earned $16 million in revenue from the iOS App Store and Google Play, according to estimates from app analytics site Sensor Tower. $13.5 million of the $16 million in revenue has come from Japan and the United States, with the game now ranking third when it comes to revenue earned by Nintendo mobile titles. During the first two weeks of availability, Fire Emblem Heroes earned $34 million, Super Mario Run earned $15.6 million, and Animal Crossing earned $9.8 million. Dragalia Lost, unsurprisingly, is performing best in Japan. 69 percent of total revenue has come from Japan, while 16 percent has come from the United States. The remaining 15 percent has come from Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau. Dragalia Lost is the 19th most popular iOS app in Japan at the current time, and the number 512th most popular app in Japan. In terms of revenue, it is ranked number 10 in Japan and number 62 in the United States. Nintendo released Dragalia Lost two weeks ago on Thursday, September 27. The game is an original swipe-based action RPG developed in partnership with Cygames. Dragalia Lost tasks players with conquering their enemies using powerful attacks and special skills, with players able to control characters who can transform into dragons to unleash their power on enemies. In addition to battling monsters, players will also need to develop a holy citadel for dragon training. Limited time multiplayer raid battles are available for up to three players online, and an

Nintendo's New iOS Game 'Dragalia Lost' Now Available

Nintendo's newest mobile game, Dragalia Lost, is now available on both Android and iOS devices in the United States, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau. Dragalia Lost is an original action RPG that was developed by Nintendo and Japanese mobile game developer Cygames. In the swipe-based game, players are tasked with conquering their enemies using powerful attacks and special skills. Players will control several characters who are able to transform into dragons to unleash their power on enemies. In addition to battling monsters, players will also need to develop a holy citadel for dragon training. Limited time multiplayer raid battles are available for up to three players online, and an internet connection is required to play. Nintendo has successfully launched several iOS games, including Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and Super Mario Run. Like Nintendo's most successful titles, Dragalia Lost is free to play and it is supported through in-app purchases. Dragalia Lost can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Nintendo DS Game 'Professor Layton and the Curious Village' Coming to iOS App Store in U.S.

The iOS App Store Twitter account over the weekend revealed that the 2007 Nintendo DS game Professor Layton and the Curious Village will be making its way to the App Store in the United States in the near future (via Engadget). Japan received a port of the puzzle game on the iOS App Store and Google Play Store this past June. Of course, with just a single tweet there isn't much additional information about the iOS release for the original Professor Layton game in the United States. Given that this will be a direct port of the game, it appears that Professor Layton and the Curious Village will not be one of Nintendo's mainline apps that are taking established characters and franchises and making them into mobile-friendly titles, like Super Mario Run and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp. Professor Layton and the Curious Village is coming to iOS 🎩 #NintendoStay tuned for more info. pic.twitter.com/UjE7fo28DQ— App Store (@AppStore) September 9, 2018 That's because the puzzle-based gameplay of the Professor Layton games should already be an easy transition to smartphones. In the first game, players take on the role of Professor Layton and his young assistant Luke as they navigate around a small village named St. Mystere. Originally developed by Level-5 and published by Nintendo worldwide, the game is mostly centered on solving puzzles and brainteasers presented by characters around the village. Since the first game, the Professor Layton series has seen numerous sequels over the years, with the last game coming out in 2017. That game, Layton's Mystery Journey, was the

'Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp' Reaches $50M Global Revenue, Which 'Fire Emblem Heroes' Achieved in 20 Days

Nintendo's latest smartphone app Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp has just reached $50 million in player spending across iOS and Android globally, according to data tracked by Sensor Tower. It took the game 289 days to reach this goal, becoming the slowest of Nintendo's latest apps to do so. Super Mario Run reached the $50 million mark 222 days after its release, while Fire Emblem Heroes achieved the $50 million milestone just 20 days after launching in February 2017. Fire Emblem Heroes has been called Nintendo and DeNA's "most successful mobile game" previously, and today's data cements the game's popularity. At the one year mark, Fire Emblem Heroes had grossed $295 million worldwide, and as of August 2018 Nintendo has earned $400 million from the game. In a report earlier this week, Sensor Tower noted that Fire Emblem Heroes had grossed $63 million between the months of July and August 2018 alone, a 34 percent jump year-on-year. While it had a slow start, the game's free-to-play structure built on in-app purchases of items like "Orbs" help keep it a consistent earner for Nintendo and DeNA. Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp is also free-to-play and includes in-app purchases for "Leaf Tickets," which can be used to reduce timers, craft items without the necessary materials, and more. While the tickets can be earned through regular gameplay, they are also available to buy with real-world money on the App Store. Still, the game has yet to match Fire Emblem Heroes' success, and Sensor Tower says that Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp has earned a majority of its revenue

Nintendo's New Smartphone Game 'Dragalia Lost' Launches September 27

Following an announcement in April, Nintendo's next mobile game Dragalia Lost will officially launch on iOS and Android devices on September 27 in the United States, Japan, Hong Kong, Taiwan, and Macau (via Engadget). The company tweeted the news late last night, also confirming that the mobile game will be getting a Nintendo Direct of its own later tonight at 8:30 p.m. PT. In the reveal earlier in the year, Nintendo described Dragalia Lost as an "original action RPG," co-developed by Nintendo and Japanese mobile developer Cygames. Otherwise, not much is known about the game besides that it will be an RPG, but we should know more tonight following the Nintendo Direct. This marks one of the first times Nintendo has not partnered with DeNA on a mobile game, the developer behind its original string of smartphone apps including Miitomo, Super Mario Run, Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and the upcoming Mario Kart Tour. Nintendo decided to expand its roster of smartphone game developers after its partnership with DeNA "fell behind schedule." The two companies originally claimed that their first app would launch in 2015, and five more would debut by March 2017. Eventually, Miitomo launched in March 2016, Super Mario Run launched in December 2016, Fire Emblem Heroes launched in February 2017, and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp launched in November 2017. Besides Super Mario Run, every mobile game released by Nintendo and made by DeNA was delayed at some point. This year, Nintendo's new president Shuntaro Furukawa stated that mobile game apps will be

Shigeru Miyamoto: Nintendo Will 'Continue Pushing' for Pay-Once Mobile Games Over Freemium Apps

Video game designer Shigeru Miyamoto wants the gaming industry to stop "nickel-and-diming" users, and launch games at fixed prices (via Bloomberg). As long as the upfront prices aren't too high, such "premium" games would create a more sustainable business model over the long term, Miyamoto says, seemingly referencing video games across mobile, console, and PC. The Super Mario creator made the comments during the Computer Entertainment Developers Conference on Wednesday in Yokohama, Japan. “We’re lucky to have such a giant market, so our thinking is, if we can deliver games at reasonable prices to as many people as possible, we will see big profits,” Miyamoto said at the Computer Entertainment Developers Conference (CEDEC) on Wednesday in Yokohama, Japan. Nintendo has tried both models on smartphones: in "Super Mario Run" it charged an upfront price of $9.99 to gain access to the full game, and in "Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp" and "Fire Emblem Heroes" it launched the games for free, with numerous opportunities for in-game purchases. Nintendo has previously said it prefers the pay-once structure of "Super Mario Run," but it still released two free-to-play apps in the year after that game launched. Additionally, even one year after launch "Super Mario Run" had yet to reach an "acceptable profit point," while stories about revenue from the freemium games were consistently more positive. Miyamoto admits that the "Super Mario Run" model hasn't exactly been a success, but says the company will "continue pushing" the pay-once model forward in an effort to avoid

Nintendo Has Earned $400M From Fire Emblem Heroes on Mobile Devices

In the 18 months since Nintendo released Fire Emblem Heroes on Android and iOS devices the game has raked in a total of $400 million worldwide, according to data shared today by Sensor Tower. That $400 million total includes earnings across both the iOS App Store and the Google Play store, and it's up from the $300 million the game had earned a year after its launch. Fire Emblem Heroes allows players to level up popular characters from the well-known Fire Emblem Nintendo game series, engaging in strategic battles as part of an original storyline developed for mobile devices. According to Sensor Tower, Fire Emblem Heroes is Nintendo and DeNA's most successful mobile game to date. Nintendo's mobile games have proven to be a lucrative venture for the company, and Fire Emblem Heroes is sold alongside two other games set in the Nintendo universe and adapted for mobile, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp and Super Mario Run. At $400 million earned, Fire Emblem Heroes has significantly outperformed the other two games, with Super Mario Run earning Nintendo an estimated $64 million to date and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp earning $42 million. Approximately 52 percent of the $400M spent on Fire Emblem Heroes is from Google Play, with the remaining 48 percent brought in by the App Store. Players in Japan spend the most on Fire Emblem Heroes accounting for 56 percent of revenue, followed by the United States at 31 percent. During the month of June, gamers spent more than $23 million on Fire Emblem Heroes, and according to Sensor Tower, momentum does not appear to be

Nintendo's Next President Sets Mobile Gaming Priority, Plans 'Game-Changing Hit' to Surge Business

Nintendo's next president, Shuntaro Furukawa, will make smartphone gaming a priority when he takes the helm of the company this June. In a new interview with Nikkei, Furukawa said that he envisions a future where Nintendo's smartphone gaming arm can become a 100 billion yen ($910 million) business. In fiscal 2017, the segment including mobile games grossed 39.3 billion yen. To do this, Furukawa plans to increase the output of smartphone gaming apps for iOS and Android devices, as well as launch a singular app that surges in popularity. Outgoing Nintendo President Tatsumi Kimishima referenced Pokémon Go as an inspiration for this plan. Pokémon Go was a collaboration between developer Niantic and The Pokémon Company, which Nintendo has a joint investment in. "From what I can see, smartphone games are the ones I want to expand the most," said Shuntaro Furukawa. "The idea that something will emerge that transforms into something big, in the same manner as game consoles, is the defining motive of the Nintendo business," he said. When asked if any of the upcoming apps would adopt Pokémon Go's augmented reality gameplay, Furukawa said that he "can't say that there are any that are like that." It's also unclear if the plans for the singular, so-called "game-changing hit" would include existing Nintendo characters or be entirely original. Nintendo has already begun adding on new developer partners besides DeNA to work on games with new characters, while DeNA continues outputting those with Nintendo IPs like the upcoming Mario Kart Tour. According to Furukawa, Nintendo

Nintendo Reveals New Action RPG 'Dragalia Lost' Coming to Smartphones Later This Year

Nintendo this week revealed a new smartphone game coming to iOS and Android devices this summer, called "Dragalia Lost." The game was created through a partnership with Japanese mobile developer Cygames and is described as an all-new "original action RPG" for smartphones. Nintendo co-developed Dragalia Lost and will "jointly operate" the app with Cygames once it launches (via TouchArcade). For now, not much is known about the game's story or gameplay mechanics. The Japanese website includes a trailer, which shows off a few of the game's characters and glimpses of the RPG gameplay. The game is also up for pre-registration for users in Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Macau. The payment structure of the game is also unknown, but previous apps by Cygames have been reliant upon Japan's popular "gacha" system, which encourages players to spend real money on in-game currency that they can use to unlock random items. In terms of payment, most of Nintendo's other smartphone games so far have been reliant upon a free-to-play system, which helped turn Fire Emblem Heroes into Nintendo's "most successful mobile game to date." Nintendo's new partnership with Cygames confirms a previous rumor that the company is seeking additional game developers to add to its slate after its partnership with DeNA fell behind schedule. DeNA helped Nintendo launch Miitomo, Super Mario Run, Fire Emblem Heroes, and Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp. The next smartphone game inspired by a Nintendo property will be Mario Kart Tour, expected to launch by March 2019. Draglia Lost will launch first in

Nintendo Celebrating Mario Day With 50% Price Drop on 'Super Mario Run' in iOS App Store

This Saturday, March 10 is "Mario Day," a day when Nintendo celebrates its mascot Mario "and his many awesome fans" around the world. Although the full plan for the company's celebrations on Saturday have not yet been revealed, one part has and it focuses on the iPhone and Android game Super Mario Run (via TouchArcade). On March 10, Nintendo will discount Super Mario Run's $9.99 in-app purchase that unlocks the full game down to $4.99, and that 50 percent discount will run for two weeks, through March 25. Nintendo has created a detailed table that shows the special discount price of Super Mario Run on the App Store and Google Play Store in every country of availability, which you can see on its website. The last IAP discount for Super Mario Run came in September 2017, alongside what Nintendo called the "biggest update ever," introducing a new gameplay mode called Remix 10, new character Princess Daisy, new world, and more. It's unclear if the game will be getting more content this weekend, like it did last September, alongside the price drop. For Mario Day last year, Nintendo celebrated in a variety of ways, including working with nonprofit Starlight Children's Foundation to provide hospitalized children with brightly colored hospital gowns featuring the company's well-known characters. There were also Mario-themed frames on Facebook, games on sale across Nintendo console platforms, and major events at PAX East in Boston and the Kids' Choice Awards on Nickelodeon. You can download and play the first few levels of Super Mario Run for free on the iOS App Store [

Fire Emblem Heroes Marked as Nintendo and DeNA's 'Most Successful Mobile Game to Date'

It's been just over one year since Fire Emblem Heroes launched on the iOS App Store in the United States, Japan, and over 30 other countries, and this week new data researched by Sensor Tower has titled the app as Nintendo and DeNA's "most successful mobile game to date." Over the course of its first year, Fire Emblem Heroes earned an estimated $295 million in player spending worldwide, helped by the game's free-to-play structure that includes in-app purchases of various items like game-boosting "Orbs." The other Nintendo/DeNA apps include the soon-to-be-discontinued Miitomo, Super Mario Run, and the most recent game, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, which has earned about $20 million across the iOS App Store and Google Play Store in the two months since release. In comparison, Fire Emblem Heroes earned $86 million in its first two months after launch, following an initial slow start in the first few days. Nintendo’s Fire Emblem Heroes is the Kyoto-based gaming giant’s most successful mobile game to date, earning an estimated $295 million in worldwide player spend during its first year of availability, according to Sensor Tower Store Intelligence data. With players worldwide continuing to spend more than $10 million per month on “luck of the draw” character draws, Fire Emblem Heroes is a clearly a financial success for Nintendo and DeNA. The question now is whether the publisher-developer duo can progress to the next echelon of mobile gaming revenue with future titles, including the recently announced Mario Kart Tour. In terms of worldwide mobile game revenue,

Upcoming Mobile Game 'Mario Kart Tour' Will Be Free-to-Start

Nintendo last week announced that its next mobile game will be "Mario Kart Tour," but with a launch date aimed at any time before the company's fiscal year ending March 2019, not much information is known about the game. Today, DeNA CEO Isao Moriyasu was reported as saying that Mario Kart Tour will be free-to-start (via TouchArcade and The Wall Street Journal). The "free-to-start" terminology is somewhat vague, but when compared to Nintendo's previous use of the phrase it could suggest where Mario Kart Tour is headed. For example, Nintendo currently describes Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp as free-to-start on the game's website, while Super Mario Run's website explains that "you can download and enjoy a portion of Super Mario Run for free." DeNA CEO said "Mario Kart Tour," a Nintendo-DeNA smartphone game planned for FY18, will be free-to-start.— Takashi Mochizuki (@mochi_wsj) February 8, 2018 While far from a definitive answer, this suggests Nintendo might lean towards its recent trend and make Mario Kart Tour a game that's free to play, with in-app purchases that help with certain tasks. Out of Nintendo's four mobile games so far, three have followed this model (Miitomo, Fire Emblem Heroes, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp), while only Super Mario Run has used the pay-once price

Nintendo Working on 'Mario Kart Tour' Game for Mobile Devices

Nintendo this evening announced that a new mobile game is in the works, and this time the company is planning to bring a major fan favorite series to iOS devices -- Mario Kart. According to Nintendo, a new Mario Kart game called "Mario Kart Tour" is in development. Little is known about the game at this time, but Nintendo says it will be released by March 2019. The checkered flag has been raised and the finish line is near. A new mobile application is now in development: Mario Kart Tour! #MarioKartTour Releasing in the fiscal year ending in March 2019. pic.twitter.com/8GIyR7ZM4z — Nintendo of America (@NintendoAmerica) February 1, 2018 Mario Kart is on of Nintendo's most popular titles, and a Mario Kart mobile game would follow successful mobile versions of games in the Super Mario, Animal Crossing, and Fire Emblem franchises. Nintendo's other mobile games include Super Mario Run, Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, and Fire Emblem Heroes. The company's first game on iOS devices was Miitomo, which was released in March of 2016. Nintendo this week announced that it plans to shut down Miitomo on May 9, 2018. Though Miitomo was not a successful venture for the company given its imminent termination, Nintendo's other games have done better. Nintendo's smartphone profits reached 11.2 billion yen this fiscal quarter, seeing growth thanks to the recent launch of Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp. The game has generated an estimated $17 million globally. Nintendo also said back in October that Fire Emblem Heroes is on track to meet its business and profit objectives.

Nintendo Details Jump in Smartphone Game Profits Following 'Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp' Launch

Nintendo recently reported earnings for its fiscal third quarter of 2017, including data related to the company's two-year-old smartphone game business. In the report, Nintendo confirmed that its smart device and intellectual property related earnings increased from 10.6 billion yen (about $98 million) in the nine months ended December 31, 2016 to 29.1 billion yen (about $267 million) in the same period in 2017. While this includes income from Nintendo's smartphone games as well as royalty income, Bloomberg reported that Nintendo's smartphone game profits specifically grew from 8.8 billion yen in the year-ago quarter to 11.2 billion yen this fiscal quarter. The only smartphone game that launched this fiscal quarter for Nintendo was Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, which is said to have generated $17 million globally and reached a download number of 22 million since its launch in November. The other major smartphone game to debut from Nintendo in 2017 was Fire Emblem Heroes. Nintendo said it plans to get its players to continue returning to and enjoying previously released iOS and Android games through ongoing updates, not including the recently confirmed imminent shut down of its first iOS app Miitomo. In our smart-device business, consumers not only continued to enjoy Super Mario Run and Fire Emblem Heroes, which became available for download during the previous fiscal year, but also had fun with Animal Crossing: Pocket Camp, released globally during October and November. Smart devices and IP related income were up to 29.1 billion yen (172% increase on a