Google

Jump to How Tos Articles

'Google' How Tos

How to Use Google Lens on iPhone

Google Lens can now recognize over a billion items in the world around us, the search engine giant announced this week. That's four times as many things that the AI-powered feature could identify when it was first launched last year, thanks partly to a huge number of Google Shopping products which have been added to its knowledge base. While its optical character recognition engine has been optimized to read more product labels, Google has also honed its machine learning and AI to recognize more animals, including common pet breeds. In addition, you can use Lens to get more information about places as well as word definitions and translations of words. Google Lens can now also recognize people, Wi-Fi network names for auto-connecting, and geometric shapes. And if it isn't sure what an object is, it will offer up similar photos that match. Google Lens originally appeared on iOS as part of Google Photos and could only be used on pictures you'd taken. However, last week Google added the feature to its flagship search app, and this implementation is better since it allows you to aim your phone's camera at things in your environment in real time. Follow the steps below if you'd like to give it a whirl. How to Use Google Lens on iPhoneIf you don't have it already, download the Google app [Direct Link] from the App Store and launch it. Sign in with your Google credentials or create an account. Tap the Lens icon to the left of the microphone in the Search bar. Tap the blue button that says Turn on camera to use Lens. Tap OK in the permissions alert to

How to Export Your Passwords and Login Data From Google Chrome

In Chrome 66, rolling out now for Mac and iOS, Google has added a password export option to the web browser so that you can easily migrate your login details to another browser via a third-party password manager app. In this article, we'll show you how to export your passwords from Chrome on Mac and iOS. At the end of the process, you'll be left with a CSV file containing all your login credentials. Popular password managers like Enpass and 1Password accept CSV files for importing login data. Just be aware that the CSV file you export from Chrome is in plain text. That means your credentials could be read by anyone with access to it, so make sure you securely delete the file once you've imported the data into your password manager of choice.

'Google' Articles

Google Pixel 3 'Lite' Shows Up in Video Leak

Google's answer to the iPhone XR appears to be close to launch in the form of a more affordable version of its flagship Pixel 3 smartphone, if a new video leak is accurate. Andro News apparently got hold of a pre-production unit of the upcoming mid-range phone, which is dubbed Pixel 3 "Lite". The device closely resembles Google's high-end Android phone from the front, but the big difference is its plastic rear, which is likely more durable than the metal and glass chassis on the Pixel 3. The upcoming phone is said to use a 5.56-inch 2,220 x 1,080 LCD display instead of an OLED panel, along with a Snapdragon 670 processor, 32GB of storage, 4GB of RAM, and a long-life 2,915 mAh battery. Notably, the device also includes a headphone jack, something that was removed for the Pixel 3. Perhaps the bigger news though is that the "Lite" model uses the same 12-megapixel camera and optically-stabilized lens as the Pixel 3, which has received high praise across the board for its photographic capabilities. (Regular MacRumors readers may recall our Google Pixel 3 XL vs. iPhone XS Max comparison found that the devices offer comparable camera quality overall, with only a few differences between shooting modes.) Andro News claims the new phone takes "the same quality photos as the Pixel 3," although given that much of Google's image-processing is software based, it's impossible to say how the cheaper model's mid-range Snapdragon SoC will affect real-world camera performance. Pixel 3 Lite leaked. Same exact camera results as the Pixel 3 proper https://t.co/bGD39kLCCRWith

Google Assistant Coming to Google Maps for iOS Today

Google is adding its Google Assistant feature to the Google Maps apps for iOS and Android, Google announced today. The feature will be available on iPhones starting this afternoon, with Google planning to enable Assistant for Google Maps via an update that's rolling out "shortly." On iOS and Android devices, Google Assistant will allow Google Maps users to control their navigation, reply to texts, and control music. On Android, it is also able to send messages through various messaging apps, a feature not available on iOS. It can also do things like calculate your ETA so you can let friends and family know when you're set to arrive. Google Assistant is already available on iOS devices through the dedicated Google Assistant app, but adding it into Maps makes it more readily accessible for the millions of people who already use the Google Maps

Google Accelerating Closure of Google+ Due to API Bug, Will Now End in April 2019

Google today announced that it is expediting the closure of its Google+ social platform, which was previously set to end in August 2019 and will now be shut down in April 2019. The company explained that it's doing this because of a discovery that 52.5 million users were impacted by a software update in November that contained a bug affecting Google+ API. The bug appears to be connected to a certain Google+ API that let apps view information that users added to their profile, even if the user had set this data as private. This included their name, email address, occupation, age, and more, but not financial data, passwords, or national identification numbers. While Google discovered and addressed the bug within a week, and promises no third party compromised its systems, it has decided to hasten the closure of the consumer version of Google+ and all Google+ APIs. Ahead of the April 2019 sunsetting of the platform, the network's APIs will be shut down within 90 days from today. Google explained what it knows about the bug: - We have confirmed that the bug impacted approximately 52.5 million users in connection with a Google+ API. - With respect to this API, apps that requested permission to view profile information that a user had added to their Google+ profile—like their name, email address, occupation, age (full list here)—were granted permission to view profile information about that user even when set to not-public. - In addition, apps with access to a user's Google+ profile data also had access to the profile data that had been shared with the

Google Maps Expanding 'For You' Recommendations Tab to iOS in Over 40 Countries Today

Google today announced that its Google Maps app for iOS will be updated today with a new "For You" tab in over 40 countries. "For You" was first announced at Google I/O in May and was initially limited to Android. The feature is designed to "tell you what you need to know about the neighborhoods you care about," such as new restaurants opening nearby, trending spots, and more, based on places you've rated and places you've visited. The tab is accompanied by a new "Match Score" that predicts which restaurants you're most likely to prefer based on your personal preferences, which is designed to help you to choose between multiple restaurant suggestions. iPhone users can install the update from the App Store later today. "For You" is also expanding to over 130 countries on Android today.

Google Chrome Will Support Dark Mode in macOS Mojave by Early 2019

Google released Chrome 71 earlier this week, but the latest version of the web browser still lacks support for Dark Mode on macOS Mojave. Fortunately, it appears that will change by early next year. Dark Mode in Canary, a developer build of Chrome As mentioned on Reddit, a Google developer recently submitted a code change that implements system-level Dark Mode in Chromium, the open source web browser that serves as the foundation of Chrome. The code change passed the review process and will make its way into a future release of Chrome. For those unaware, there are several different builds of Chrome that Google uses to slowly test and roll out new features. All code changes begin in Chromium and then work their way from Canary to Chrome Dev to Chrome Beta to Chrome, the stable version released to all users roughly every six weeks. Dark Mode in Canary, a developer build of Chrome Dark Mode in Chromium remains hidden behind feature flags, which are essentially code-level toggle switches, but we were able to run a Terminal command to force the darker appearance into action and took screenshots. The system-level Dark Mode applies a dark appearance to much of the Chrome interface, including the omnibox, tabs, menus, bookmark bar, status bar, and dialog boxes. The startup page with Google search and shortcuts will also have a black background when the Dark appearance is enabled in System Preferences. Most of the current Dark Mode colors in Chromium are placeholders, according to one developer working on the project, so there may be slight changes to come. One

Google Allo Shutting Down Next Year in Favor of Google's Main Messages App

Google this week announced that it is shutting down its messaging app Google Allo [iOS Direct Link], and incorporating many of its features into the Messages app on Android smartphones. Google Allo is an expanded messaging app that lets users send GIFs, text from their desktops, and use Smart Reply. Now, Google says to continue Messages' momentum it has decided to "stop supporting Allo to focus on Messages." Many of Allo's features have already been integrated into Messages, and Allo will continue to work through March 2019. Until then, users will be able to export all existing conversations from the app. Because Google's main Messages app isn't available on iOS, Allo users on iPhone will have to migrate to an alternative texting platform when the service shutters. Google Allo first launched in September 2016, pitched as the company's "intelligent messaging app," thanks to the inclusion of Google Assistant. Allo is available on iOS and Android smartphones, and offers many features that are comparable to messaging apps like Apple's iMessage and Facebook's

Google's 'Project Fi' Cellular Service Now Supports iPhone

Google today announced a major expansion of its Project Fi smartphone plan, which has previously been available on select Android devices. As of today, iPhone and iPad users are also able to take advantage of Fi, with a new a new iOS app available with setup steps. Project Fi, which is being renamed "Google Fi" alongside the expansion of the service, is designed to provide hassle-free cellular service with perks like international data coverage at an affordable price. The Google Fi service is priced at $20 for unlimited talk and text, along with $10 for each GB of data used up to 6GB. At the 6GB cap, data becomes free, and at 15GB, data speeds slow down. The monthly fee caps out at $80, not including taxes and fees, and it costs an additional $15 per person. On the iPhone, LTE data speeds, unlimited texts, and unlimited calls are included, and there are no roaming fees in more than 170 countries. There are, however, some restrictions. While iMessage functions fine, sending texts to non-iPhones requires configuring some settings, and voicemails will not be able to take advantage of the visual voicemail feature in iOS. Voicemails will instead be available as text messages, and you'll need to call to check them. Google Fi's network switching feature and VPN do not work on iOS. Google Fi compatibility on an iPhone XS Max Google Fi operates as an MNVO, aka mobile virtual network operator, which means its coverage comes from other carriers like T-Mobile, US Cellular, and Sprint. Google devices are able to take advantage of network switching for better

Google Assistant iOS App Gains Support for Siri Shortcuts

Google has updated its Assistant app for iOS to support Siri Shortcuts, enabling users to invoke Google's virtual assistant using Apple's virtual assistant, without even having to launch the app. Once the update has been installed, Assistant users are presented with an "Add to Siri" button that lets them record a phrase of their choosing to be used after saying the "Hey, Siri" command. As long as the iOS device is unlocked, users will then be able to access Assistant by combining the two commands. The Siri Shortcuts feature also supports additional phrases that users often use with Google Assistant. As The Verge notes, this opens up possibilities for creating custom voice commands for Google actions, including smart home routines, from within Siri. This isn't the first incidence of virtual assistant crosstalk on Apple devices. Last year, Amazon and Microsoft announced a collaboration that would allow iOS users to access Alexa via the Cortana app, with a "Hey Cortana, open Alexa" voice command. However, in the latter case, iOS users still can't say "Hey Cortana, open Alexa" from the Home screen, or when the device is locked, because Apple only allows third-party virtual assistants to function within their apps. Google's Assistant app is a free download for iPhone and iPad, available on the App Store. [Direct Link]

Google Maps Gains Messaging Feature for Users to Chat With Local Businesses

A new feature rolling out for Google Maps will allow iOS and Android users to message local businesses with their queries without having to leave the GPS-based navigation app. The feature is an extension of Google's real-time business-to-customer messaging service that the company introduced in select countries last year. Businesses that signed up to the service include a Message button on their Business Profiles on Google Search allowing people to get in touch, and those same messages are set to appear in the side menu of Google Maps. This from the Google blog: Sending messages to businesses gives you the opportunity to ask questions without having to make a phone call so that you can order a cake for your mom's birthday while on the bus or find out if a shoe store has your size without having to wait on hold. Now you'll see your messages with the businesses you connect with via Business Profiles within the Google Maps app, where you're already looking for things to do and places to go or shop. As part of the rollout, Google is also releasing a revamped Google My Business mobile app for iOS and Android that lets businesses browse their followers, reviews and messages, as well as create content for their business profile on Google. The dual changes follow a recent update to Google Maps that introduced a new "Follow" button to let users track businesses and learn about promotions, events and, other news. The features are Google's attempt to rival Facebook Pages, which have been the more popular go-to for companies seeking to broadcast their outward-facing

Google's Upcoming 'Night Sight' Mode for Pixel Phones Captures Remarkable Low-Light Photos

At a media event in New York City earlier this month, Google previewed a new low-light camera feature called "Night Sight" that uses machine learning to choose the right colors based on the content of the image. The result is much brighter photos in low-light conditions, without having to use flash. Google showed a side-by-side comparison of two unedited photos shot in low light with an iPhone XS and its latest Pixel 3 smartphone with Night Sight, and the photo shot on the latter device is much brighter. Google said Night Sight will be available next month for its Pixel smartphones, but an XDA Developers forum member managed to get the feature to work ahead of time, and The Verge's Vlad Savov tested out the pre-release software on a Pixel 3 XL. The results, pictured below, are simply remarkable. Without Night Sight With Night Sight Without Night Sight With Night Sight Without Night Sight With Night Sight Google and Apple are both heavily invested in computational photography. On the latest iPhones, for example, Smart HDR results in photos with more highlight and shadow detail, while Depth Control significantly improves Portrait Mode. But, Night Sight takes low-light smartphone photography to a whole new

Google Follows in Apple's Footsteps With Free 4K Movie Upgrades and Cheaper Prices of $20 and Under

Google this week announced that it will now automatically upgrade all previously purchased films from participating Hollywood studios to 4K, even if those movies were originally bought in SD or HD. The company is also reducing the price of new 4K movies on its Google Play store to match SD/HD prices of $19.99 and below. Previously, 4K films on Google Play rose to as much as $30. These new updates match numerous practices that Apple has implemented on the iTunes Movies store starting with the launch of the Apple TV 4K in September 2017. With the rollout of 4K support in iTunes, customers' back catalog of HD movies were automatically upgraded to 4K where applicable, and Apple promised all new 4K releases would remain at a competitive price of $19.99. Apple never specified that SD movies were getting a boost to 4K, but some users have noted that select films upgraded from SD to HD to 4K over time. Still, other users have not seen any updates to their SD iTunes movies, perhaps due to missing rights from certain movie studios, so Google's promise of both SD and HD upgrades to 4K should be an easier transition for those with a bunch of old movies in the Google ecosystem. Google will also notify users when their movies are upgraded to 4K, and point out which ones were upgraded in the Play Movies and TV app, which is a feature that iTunes lacks at this point. For Apple users curious about this aspect of their film collections, the third-party Cheap Charts iOS app [Direct Link] has an "Upgraded to 4K" section with a reverse chronological list of films that recently

Chrome 70 Now Enables Picture-in-Picture by Default on macOS

Google Chrome now enables picture-in-picture as a default setting on Mac, Windows, and Linux computers as of Chrome 70. If you are up-to-date and watching a compatible video in the Chrome web browser, you can minimize it and continue browsing the web in other tabs, while the video keeps playing in a new miniature screen (via Android Police). The feature works similarly to Safari's implementation of PIP: on compatible websites you can two-finger click twice on a playing video to find "Picture in Picture." This will pause the video on the main tab, turn it black, and display the video in a new window that can be moved around anywhere on the screen. PIP was previously in the Chrome 69 beta but it had to be manually enabled, so it appears that Google is making it easier for users to gain access to the feature with Chrome 70. PIP still isn't available on every video-playing website since it will have to be adopted by each site, but you can enable PIP with YouTube in Chrome on macOS starting

Google Pixel 3 XL vs. iPhone XS Max: Which Camera Reigns Supreme?

Google's newest flagship smartphones, the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL, are officially launching later this week. With their high-quality cameras, fast processors, and other improvements, the new devices are direct competitors to Apple's newly released iPhone XS models. We were able to get our hands on the new Pixel 3 and Pixel 3XL ahead of their debut, and in our latest YouTube video, we compared the Google Pixel 3 XL camera to Apple's iPhone XS Max camera to see which one reigns supreme. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Both the Pixel 3 and the Pixel 3 XL are equipped with a single-lens 12-megapixel rear camera system, while the iPhone XS Max uses a dual-lens camera system that features a 12-megapixel wide-angle lens and a 12-megapixel telephoto lens. The two camera system allows the iPhone XS Max to do things like capture Portrait Mode images with an adjustable depth of field and a blurred background, but the Pixel 3 XL has much of the same functionality enabled through software. Like the iPhone XS Max, the Pixel 3 XL features a Portrait Mode. With its newest devices, Apple introduced some improvements to Portrait Mode with the A12 Bionic chip, and that gave it the edge over the Pixel 3 XL in our image tests. The Pixel 3 XL won out when it came to edge detection in most cases, with less blurring in areas we didn't want blurred, but iPhone XS Max Portrait Mode images were sharper. Google advertises a new "Super Res" zoom in the Pixel 3 XL, but the single-lens camera system can't compete with Apple's telephoto lens. With the

New Google Photos 'Live Albums' Share Pictures of People and Pets Automatically

Following yesterday's Google event, the company is rolling out an update for Google Photos that introduces a new feature called Live Albums. Powered by Google's facial recognition algorithms, Live Albums allow users to create albums that are automatically updated with pictures from their library of a specific person or pet. Once an album has been tagged as a Live Album, it can be shared with others and will still automatically update to include new shots when they become available. From Google's The Keyword blog: You can turn any album into a live album. Just choose the people (and pets) you want to see, and Google Photos will automatically add photos of them to your album as you take them. Then, you can share your album with family and friends so they can be a part of special moments as they happen—no manual updates needed.Live Albums in Google Photos are created in the same way as a normal album, by selecting the Album tab and tapping the New album icon – just be sure to tap the new setting "Automatically add photos of people and pets" on the next screen, and you'll then be able to select the ones you want to include. You can also opt to be notified when any new photos are added to the album. In addition, Google says that the 7-inch display on its just-announced Google Home Hub smart speaker will also display these Live Albums including recently added photos. Live albums are rolling out now in a number of countries on Android, iOS and the web. Google Photos is a free download for iPhone and iPad available on the App Store. [Direct Link

Google Announces Pixel 3 Smartphone, 'Home Hub' Smart Speaker, and Pixel Slate Tablet

Google today held its annual "Made by Google" fall event, unveiling a new line of products that included the all-new Google Pixel 3 smartphone, a screen-based smart speaker, and a new tablet. Notably, Google pointed out at the beginning of its presentation that 2018 marks the 20 year anniversary of the search giant. The central announcement at the event was the 5.5-inch Google Pixel 3 and 6.3-inch Pixel 3 XL. The Pixel 3 XL has an edge-to-edge display and a notch at the top of the smartphone that holds its front-facing camera system, akin to iPhone X onwards. Unlike Apple's smartphones, the Pixel 3 XL has a chin on the bottom of the device. The company focused on the Pixel 3's advanced camera, including an HDR+ mode and "Top Shot," which automatically captures multiple shots with HDR+ and recommends one that might be better than your photo. Night Sight will enhance photos captured in low-light scenarios, and Google compared nighttime images on the iPhone XS with those taken on Pixel 3. Users can also now edit the depth of field effect in portrait mode, like on iPhone XS and XS Max. The second camera on the front of the Pixel 3 smartphone allows for a group selfie feature, which captures 184 percent more of a scene than the iPhone XS, according to Google. The new smartphone also has a few AR features on the camera called Google Playground, including characters from The Avengers and an animated version of Childish Gambino created in partnership with Donald Glover. Outside of the camera, Google Pixel 3 has a Call Screen feature, where Google Assistant can

Google Shuttering Google+ for Consumers After Undisclosed Data Exposure

The Google+ social network that Google introduced back in 2011 suffered from a major bug that Google opted not to disclose to the public, reports The Wall Street Journal. A Google+ software glitch provided outside developers with the ability to access private Google+ profile data from 2015 to March 2018. In the spring of this year, internal investigators discovered the issue and fixed it. The problem was caused by a bug in a Google+ API designed to let app developers access profile and contact information about the people who signed up to use their apps. Google found that Google+ was also allowing developers to access the data of users who had their profiles set to private. Up to 438 apps had access to customer data.During a two-week period in late March, Google ran tests to determine the impact of the bug, one of the people said. It found 496,951 users who had shared private profile data with a friend could have had that data accessed by an outside developer, the person said. Some of the individuals whose data was exposed to potential misuse included paying users of G Suite, a set of productivity tools including Google Docs and Drive, the person said. G Suite customers include businesses, schools and governments.In an internal memo, Google's legal staff recommended against disclosing the bug because it would invite "immediate regulatory interest" and result in a comparison to Facebook's Cambridge Analytica scandal. Data from hundreds of thousands of users was potentially accessible, but Google did not discover misuse of the data by outside developers. Exposed

Google Maps Makes it Easier to Decide on a Restaurant With New Group Planning Feature

Google today announced a new group planning feature for Google Maps on iOS and Android, which aims to make it easier for a group of friends to decide on a place to eat. To use the feature, open Google Maps and tap "Restaurants" on the Explore tab. Then long press on any location to add it to a shortlist, shown in a small floating bubble on the lower right side of the screen. Once you add a few places you can share the shortlist with friends through any messaging app, like iMessages, which will then let them browse the list and link them back to Google Maps. Friends can then vote in Google Maps on their favorite restaurant in the shortlist, and every member in the group can add and delete places. Voting results are showed in Google Maps, and if a group member doesn't have the app they can also view it on the web. This may sound familiar: you and your friends are trying to pick a place for dinner, but no one wants to make the decision and you don't know where to go. How do you decide on a place that your BBQ aficionado bestie, quinoa-loving sister, and wannabe foodie friend can all enjoy without scrolling through a ton of links in group text messages? Starting today, you can use Google Maps to easily plan where to go as a group At Google I/O in May, Google outlined numerous features coming to Google Maps throughout the year, including AR Street View, a "For You" Tab, and this week's group planning feature. Recently, Google Maps on iOS also updated with an events section and elevation data, and introduced CarPlay support in iOS 12. Group planning will start

Chrome 70 Will Allow Users to Opt-Out of Controversial Automatic Sign-in Feature

Google says it is willing to make changes to its new Chrome auto-login feature, following heavy criticism from privacy-conscious users. In previous versions of the browser, it was left up to the user whether they wanted to log in to Chrome while they used the app. However in Chrome 69, released earlier this month, if you sign in to a Google site like Google Search, Gmail, or YouTube, you also get logged into Chrome automatically, and there's currently no way around it. Google originally claimed the feature was introduced to prevent data from leaking between accounts on shared computers, but the move has been criticized for its potential to make it theoretically easier for Google to upload users' browsing history. Google responded to the criticism in a blog post: "We want to be clear that this change to sign-in does not mean Chrome sync gets turned on," said Chrome product manager Zach Koch. "Users who want data like their browsing history, passwords, and bookmarks available on other devices must take additional action, such as turning on sync."Despite clearing that up, the blowback has apparently been vehement enough for Google to tweak Chrome 70, due in October, which will offer users a clear opt-out for the auto-login feature. While we think sign-in consistency will help many of our users, we're adding a control that allows users to turn off linking web-based sign-in with browser-based sign-in – that way users have more control over their experience. For users that disable this feature, signing into a Google website will not sign them into Chrome.In

Google Discontinuing 'Inbox by Gmail' in March 2019, Points Users Toward Gmail

Just over two months after Google updated the "Inbox by Gmail" app for iOS to support iPhone X, the company this week announced that it will discontinue the service at the end of March 2019. Inbox by Gmail was an experimental email app, offering users features like snoozing emails to check later, Smart Reply, high-priority notifications, and more. The company says that in the four years of the app's life it has "learned a lot about how to make email better," adding some of the most popular Inbox features directly into its main Gmail client. Because of this, and to maintain a "more focused approach," Google will shutter Inbox by Gmail and focus entirely on Gmail. Four years after launching Inbox in 2014, we've learned a lot about how to make email better—and we’ve taken popular Inbox experiences and added them into Gmail to help more than a billion people get more done with their emails everyday. As we look to the future, we want to take a more focused approach that will help us bring the best email experience to everyone. As a result, we’re planning to focus solely on Gmail and say goodbye to Inbox by Gmail at the end of March 2019. In an effort to help users transition from Inbox to Gmail, the company has set up a new guide on its support website. Google says that the new Gmail, which launched in April, will be a nice home for former Inbox users since it incorporates many of the same features as Inbox, as well as some new

Google's New Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL Smartphones Likely to Debut at Upcoming October 9 Event

Google today sent out invitations to members of the media for a "Made by Google" event that's set to be held in New York City on Tuesday, October 9. At the event, Google is likely to unveil its Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL smartphones, which will be competing with the trio of new iPhones that Apple is set to unveil next week. It's official, Google sends out invites for its annual event https://t.co/3YOk9wsQnq pic.twitter.com/1L5wzy7YEU— CNET (@CNET) September 6, 2018 Details about the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL have already leaked thanks to multiple hardware units and images that have surfaced from Russian bloggers and a device that was left in a Lyft. Image via Mobile-review.com The 6.2-inch Pixel 3 XL will feature a deep iPhone X-style notch that's been the subject of jokes on the internet since early images leaked, while it looks like the smaller 5.5-inch Pixel 3 will be notchless. Wireless charging will be available on both devices through glass rear shells, and the two smartphones will feature single-lens rear cameras and dual front-facing cameras. A fingerprint sensor is located at the back of each device, and given the inclusion of USB-C headphones and a USB-C to audio jack device, it looks like the Pixel 3 will not feature a headphone jack. Image via Mobile-review.com In past years, Google has unveiled multiple other products at fall events, so there are likely other devices Google is set to debut aside from the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL. Apple is unveiling its own new 2018 smartphone lineup a month ahead of Google on Wednesday, September 12.