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How to Export Your Passwords and Login Data From Google Chrome

In Chrome 66, rolling out now for Mac and iOS, Google has added a password export option to the web browser so that you can easily migrate your login details to another browser via a third-party password manager app. In this article, we'll show you how to export your passwords from Chrome on Mac and iOS. At the end of the process, you'll be left with a CSV file containing all your login credentials. Popular password managers like Enpass and 1Password accept CSV files for importing login data. Just be aware that the CSV file you export from Chrome is in plain text. That means your credentials could be read by anyone with access to it, so make sure you securely delete the file once you've imported the data into your password manager of choice.

'Google' Articles

Google Discontinuing 'Inbox by Gmail' in March 2019, Points Users Toward Gmail

Just over two months after Google updated the "Inbox by Gmail" app for iOS to support iPhone X, the company this week announced that it will discontinue the service at the end of March 2019. Inbox by Gmail was an experimental email app, offering users features like snoozing emails to check later, Smart Reply, high-priority notifications, and more. The company says that in the four years of the app's life it has "learned a lot about how to make email better," adding some of the most popular Inbox features directly into its main Gmail client. Because of this, and to maintain a "more focused approach," Google will shutter Inbox by Gmail and focus entirely on Gmail. Four years after launching Inbox in 2014, we've learned a lot about how to make email better—and we’ve taken popular Inbox experiences and added them into Gmail to help more than a billion people get more done with their emails everyday. As we look to the future, we want to take a more focused approach that will help us bring the best email experience to everyone. As a result, we’re planning to focus solely on Gmail and say goodbye to Inbox by Gmail at the end of March 2019. In an effort to help users transition from Inbox to Gmail, the company has set up a new guide on its support website. Google says that the new Gmail, which launched in April, will be a nice home for former Inbox users since it incorporates many of the same features as Inbox, as well as some new

Google's New Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL Smartphones Likely to Debut at Upcoming October 9 Event

Google today sent out invitations to members of the media for a "Made by Google" event that's set to be held in New York City on Tuesday, October 9. At the event, Google is likely to unveil its Google Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL smartphones, which will be competing with the trio of new iPhones that Apple is set to unveil next week. It's official, Google sends out invites for its annual event https://t.co/3YOk9wsQnq pic.twitter.com/1L5wzy7YEU— CNET (@CNET) September 6, 2018 Details about the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL have already leaked thanks to multiple hardware units and images that have surfaced from Russian bloggers and a device that was left in a Lyft. Image via Mobile-review.com The 6.2-inch Pixel 3 XL will feature a deep iPhone X-style notch that's been the subject of jokes on the internet since early images leaked, while it looks like the smaller 5.5-inch Pixel 3 will be notchless. Wireless charging will be available on both devices through glass rear shells, and the two smartphones will feature single-lens rear cameras and dual front-facing cameras. A fingerprint sensor is located at the back of each device, and given the inclusion of USB-C headphones and a USB-C to audio jack device, it looks like the Pixel 3 will not feature a headphone jack. Image via Mobile-review.com In past years, Google has unveiled multiple other products at fall events, so there are likely other devices Google is set to debut aside from the Pixel 3 and Pixel 3 XL. Apple is unveiling its own new 2018 smartphone lineup a month ahead of Google on Wednesday, September 12.

Idle Android Devices Send Data to Google Nearly 10 Times More Often Than iOS Devices do to Apple, Research Finds

Idle Android devices typically send data ten times more often to Google than iOS devices do to Apple's servers, according to new research shared by trade association Digital Content Next. In a paper titled "Google Data Collection," Douglas C. Schmidt, a computer science professor at Vanderbilt University, arrives at some stark conclusions regarding how much Google is collecting about consumers who use the company's products, even when they aren't interacting with their smartphones and tablets. Among several findings, Schmidt's experiments found that an idle Android phone with Chrome web browser active in the background communicated location information to Google 340 times during a 24-hour period. An equivalent experiment found that on an iOS device with Safari open but not Chrome, Google could not collect any appreciable data unless a user was interacting with the device. In addition, he found that an idle Android phone running Chrome sends back to Google nearly fifty times as many data requests per hour as an idle iPhone running Safari. Overall, an idle Android device was found to communicate with Google nearly 10 times more often than an Apple device communicates with Apple servers. As well as data transmission frequencies, Schmidt's research also turned up some of the ways that Google can potentially tie together anonymous data collected through passive means with the personal information of its users. For example, on an Android device, so-called "anonymous" advertising identifiers that collect activity data on apps and third-party web page visits

Google Fit Updates With Apple Watch-Like Rings That Track 'Move Minutes' and 'Heart Points'

Google today updated its Wear OS iPhone app [Direct Link] and Google Fit Android app with a new redesign that emphasizes closing a set of rings, similar to Apple's Activity app. Every day, Google Fit will task users to close one ring based on "move minutes" and another ring based on "heart points" (via The Verge). "Move minutes" is a metric that is intended to be better than measuring daily steps because it can capture multiple activities, and walking "might not be a great option" for some users, Google Fit senior product manager Margaret Hollendoner explains. "Heart points" differs from "move minutes" by requiring users to engage in activities that will get their heart rate up but not require heavy physical activity (although it will reward more points for intense workouts). Hollendoner says that it can be "as simple as picking up the pace when you're walking." Both of these metrics are measured when wearing one of Google's Wear OS watches, but there are other options available as well. You can import health data from other devices compatible with Google Fit, although the company points out that the metrics might not be as accurate. Similar to the Apple Watch, once personal data is input in Wear OS and Google Fit, the apps can offer up goals that it believes are appropriate for each individual user. The apps can also suggest that you might need another 20 minutes of exercise to hit a weekly goal, even if you slacked off earlier in the week. Google collaborated with the American Heart Association and the World Health Organization to build the new rings and

Google Planning to Launch Echo Show-Like Smart Speaker With Touch Screen Later This Year

Google entered the smart speaker market in 2016 with the introduction of Google Home, allowing users to speak to Google Assistant and control various smart home products, listen to music, get the news, and more. Eventually, Google added the Home Mini and Home Max to the lineup, introducing products that were direct competitors to the Amazon Echo Dot and Apple HomePod, respectively. Looking forward, the next Google Home will be a smart speaker equipped with a touch display that should arrive in time for the holiday shopping season, according to sources speaking to Nikkei Asian Review. This means that the new device "is likely to be similar to the Amazon Echo Show," which includes a display so users can do things like watch videos, view photos, and hold video calls. The Lenovo Smart Display with Google Assistant (left) and Amazon Echo Show (right) Google's plan for the upcoming device is described as "aggressive": "Google targets to ship some 3 million units for the first batch of the new model of smart speaker that comes with a screen," an industry source said. "It's an aggressive plan." Earlier in 2018, Google announced a new "Smart Display" platform with partners like Lenovo, JBL, and Sony. Through these partnerships, the Google Assistant can be placed in devices not directly built by Google, like the Lenovo Smart Display and upcoming JBL Link View and ThinQ View. The new product described in today's report would represent Google's own first-party entry into this market. Google and Amazon butted heads following the launch of the Echo Show last year, when Google

Google's New Cloud Storage Plans Launch in the U.S.

Google today launched its new cloud storage pricing scheme under the moniker Google One, which replaces all paid storage plans under the Google Drive brand. The new plans include 100GB storage for $1.99 a month, 200GB for $2.99 a month, and 2TB for $9.99 a month (down from $19.99). The free 15GB for non-paying users remains. There's also a new family option for divvying up a single storage plan amongst up to five members. As a result of the changes, Google is removing its 1TB/$9.99 plan, but existing 1TB Drive plans will be upgraded to 2TB at no extra cost. Pricing for plans larger than 2TB will remain the same. The new storage plans provide users with space for Google Drive, Gmail, and original quality photos and videos (including 4K) in Google Photos. The paid plans also come with live chat support, something that was previously limited to G Suite business account holders. Apple's iCloud monthly storage plans aren't so different: they start with 5GB free storage for non-paying users, then offer 50GB for $0.99, 200GB for $2.99, and 2TB for $9.99. On the face of it, Google One's new 100GB/$1.99 plan offers something of a middle ground between iCloud's 50GB and 200GB tiers, but that doesn't account for the practicalities of switching ecosystems that you'd need to factor in, not to mention differing privacy policies. As of today, the new Google One plans are available to users in the United States, with existing Drive subscribers there having already been moved to the new plans. Google is promising availability for other regions

Google's iOS and Android Apps Track and Store Location Data With Location History Disabled

Some Google apps on iOS and Android devices continue to store location history even with the setting disabled, according to a new AP report citing data collected by computer science researchers at Princeton. Location History, a feature available in Google apps like Google Maps, is an option that allows the app to display the locations that you've visited in a timeline. Princeton researcher Gunnar Acar turned off the Location History option in his Google account, but his devices continued to record the locations he had visited. Data collected from a Princeton researcher on an Android phone with Location History disabled It appears that even with Location History paused, some Google apps are ignoring the setting and continue to store time-stamped location data, due to confusing data collection policies that allow other app features to also store location information.For example, Google stores a snapshot of where you are when you merely open its Maps app. Automatic daily weather updates on Android phones pinpoint roughly where you are. And some searches that have nothing to do with location, like "chocolate chip cookies," or "kids science kits," pinpoint your precise latitude and longitude -- accurate to the square foot -- and save it to your Google account.While Princeton's research focused on Android devices, independent AP testing confirmed that iPhones are exhibiting the same behavior when used with Google apps. In response to a query about the Location History tracking, Google said that it is clear about its location policies. As it turns out though, the way

Google's New iOS App 'Cameos' Lets Celebrities Respond to Popular Questions in Search Results

Google this week debuted a new app called "Cameos," which lets celebrities record video answers to "the most asked questions on Google," and then post the recordings directly to Google's search results (via TechCrunch). The company says that this will let users "get answers directly" from the source when searching for facts and trivia about certain people in the spotlight. Although anyone can download the app [Direct Link], Cameos requires access to be granted once it's downloaded. Celebrities who gain access can browse the Internet's "top questions" asked about them, choose which ones they want to answer, and record a video of their response. Cameos will push celebrities with new questions and searches to ensure that their Google-related content "stays recent and timely." With the app, high-profile users can respond directly to their fans' biggest questions and leave out any potential misinformation provided from other websites sourced from a Google search. Once a question is answered, Google says that the response videos get posted "right to Google" so that users can see the videos when they search for the celebrity, or similar questions about the person. The videos will also appear on each celebrity's feed in the main Google

Google Pixel 3 XL Production Unit Leak Reveals Taller iPhone X-Like Notch

Although Google's major fall event is still about two months away, typically occurring in October and ushering in a new generation of Pixel smartphones and other products, today leaked pictures have been shared online highlighting the upcoming Google Pixel 3 XL. Images from Telegram user @LuchkovCh via Android Police The images depict an alleged "pre-release" final production unit of the Pixel 3 XL smartphone, sourced from a Russian tech blogger (via Android Police). Images showcase the rear and front of the device, with an iPhone X-like notch at the top of the Pixel 3 XL's display that's not as wide as Apple's, but is noticeably taller. Previous CAD leaks suggest that a smaller 5.4-inch Pixel 3 will not have a notch, while the larger 6.2-inch Pixel 3 XL is what appears in the images today, notch included. It's believed that Google is using the notch to house improved cameras, including two camera lenses. Per Bloomberg, from a report in May: The bigger Pixel will include two camera lenses on the front of the phone inside of the notch, one of the people said. The notch, or cutout, at the top of the new larger Pixel’s screen won’t be as wide as a similar feature on the iPhone X, but is noticeably taller, according to the people. Google aims to eventually remove the bezels completely in a future Pixel, but is retaining the notch and chin this year to keep stereo speakers on the front of the phone, the people said Additionally, the images suggest that customers will get "Pixel Bud-esque" wired USB-C earphones with the Pixel 3 XL. There also appears to be a

Gmail App for iOS Now Includes Option to Disable Conversation View

The Gmail app for iOS was today updated with an option to turn off the threaded conversation view that some users have been unhappy with. Toggling off "Conversation View" in the Settings menu in the Gmail app will now let users see each of their emails listed individually in their inbox rather than grouped up in an "easier to digest and follow" format, as Google puts it. Gmail on the desktop has long allowed users to turn off Conversation View, and today's update introduces feature parity on mobile devices. Your Conversation View settings are synced across devices, so if Conversation View is disabled on desktop, it will be disabled on mobile and vice versa. Google says the toggle for disabling Conversation View is rolling out to all iOS and Android users, but it could take up to 15 days for the feature to be visible to

Google Releases Android 9 Pie as Previous Oreo Release is Installed on Just 12% of Devices

Google's latest Android operating system update, Android 9 Pie, was officially released to customers today following a beta testing period that started earlier this year. Android Pie introduces a new gesture-based system interface that's similar to the interface of the iPhone X, with iPhone-like swipes for navigating through the operating system. We went hands-on with Android Pie earlier this year when it was in a beta testing phase. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. The new update also introduces the Android Dashboard, designed to tell you how much time you're spending on your device, which is similar to Apple's own Screen Time feature. A new Do Not Disturb option called "Shush" silences Android devices when placed facedown, and a Wind Down option lets Android users select a specific bedtime to turn the interface gray to discourage smartphone usage at night. Android Pie also includes an Adaptive Battery feature that maximizes battery power by prioritizing the apps you're most likely to use next, App Actions for predicting what you'll want to do next (much like Siri Suggestions), and Slices, a feature that brings up information from your favorite apps right in search, is coming in the future. Like all new versions of Android, Android Pie is available for a limited number of smartphones at its launch because Android-based smartphones use customized versions of the Android operating system, and each smartphone manufacturer needs to make the new software available to its customers. Android Pie is available to Pixel phones today,

Google Maps for iOS Updated With 'Match' Customized Restaurant Recommendations

Google Maps was today updated with a new "Match" feature that's designed to offer up personalized restaurant recommendations based on a user's customized tastes. The Match option allows users to tap on a food or drink spot to see if they're likely to enjoy a new spot based on past restaurant visiting history. The update also includes a list of how many restaurants have been visited in the Explore tabs trending feature. Thanks for using Google Maps! - Our new "match" feature will help you find your one true love. And by love, we mean your next favorite cheeseburger. Tap on a food or drink spot to see how likely you are to enjoy it based on your unique preferences - so you can spend more time eating and less time searching for places to go. - When viewing trending lists in the Explore tab, you can now see how many restaurants you've been to. Keep discovering and going to new places to complete a list!Google's Match feature was first outlined in May at Google I/O, and it rolled out for Android users in June before expanding to iOS users today. Recommendations will take into account food and drink preferences selected in Google Maps, places you've been to, and places you've rated or added to a list. Scores for restaurants will get smarter over time with usage. Google Maps can be downloaded from the iOS App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Google's Street View App for iOS Gets iPhone X Update

Google today updated its Street View app for iOS, finally adding support for the iPhone X's display eight months after the device's launch. Google Street View is designed to allow users to explore different locations and landmarks around the world using the Street View feature. The app also allows users to create photo spheres with the iPhone's camera, and today's update also improves support for rendering 360 degree panos. What's New - Support for iPhone X - Improvements for rendering 360 panosGoogle had been slow to update some of its apps for the iPhone X, but made progress this month first with Inbox by Gmail and now Street View. Many of Google's most popular apps now work properly with the iPhone X, two months ahead of when Apple is expected to release new iPhone models that will use the same notched design and taller

European Commission Fines Google $5.1B for Favoring and Pre-Installing Own Services on Android

The European Commission hit Google with a $5.1 billion fine today, stating that the tech company broke EU antitrust laws by striking deals with Android phone manufacturers to favor Google's services over rival services (via The New York Times). Android P is the newest version of the software, set to launch this fall Specifically, the European Commission pointed towards the Google search bar and Chrome web browser coming pre-installed on Android smartphones like those made by HTC, Huawei, and Samsung. With these options already in smartphones when users purchase them, other services are "unfairly boxed out." “Google has used Android as a vehicle to cement the dominance of its search engine,” said Margrethe Vestager, Europe’s antitrust chief. “These practices have denied rivals the chance to innovate and compete on the merits. They have denied European consumers the benefits of effective competition in the important mobile sphere. This is illegal under E.U. antitrust rules.” Now, Google has 90 days to ends these practices or face penalties of up to 5 percent of the worldwide average daily revenues of parent company Alphabet. In response, Google's European Twitter account confirmed that the company will appeal the Commission's decision. .@Android provides choice. With Android, you have a choice of 24,000 devices, at every price point, from more than 1,300 different brands & with over 1 million apps available in the Google Play Store. #AndroidWorks More on our blog: https://t.co/dOXaQ6ZPT3 pic.twitter.com/kK8EHiAVqb— Google Europe (@googleeurope) July 18, 2018

Google Adds Morse Code Accessibility Feature to Gboard on iOS

Google has added support for Morse code typing to its Gboard app for iOS, providing an accessible method of digital communication for people with disabilities. The customizable feature replaces the letters of the keyboard with large dot and dash keys to enter text, and offers text-to-Morse sequences to the auto-suggestion strip above the keyboard. Google has also launched a Morse Typing Trainer web game that teachers users how to communicate in Morse code using Gboard. Tania Finlayson, an assistive tech developer with cerebral palsy who works on the Gboard project, explained in a Google blog post how Morse code has helped her communicate more effectively: "At first I thought learning Morse code would be a waste of time, but soon learned that it gave me total freedom with my words, and for the first time, I could talk with ease, without breaking my neck. School became fun, instead of exhausting. I could focus on my studies, and have real conversations with my friends for the first time. Also, I did not need an adult figure with me every moment at school, and that was awesome."For existing Gboard users, the Morse code feature is delivered in an update (version 1.29). Gboard is a free download for iPhone available on the App Store. [Direct Link]

Inbox by Gmail Finally Gains Support for iPhone X

The Inbox by Gmail app for iOS devices was today updated with support for the iPhone X, a full eight months after the larger-screened iPhone launched. Since November 2017, Inbox by Gmail has received 13 updates, none of which included iPhone X support until today. Inbox is one of Google's last apps to get iPhone X support, with most other apps updated earlier in the year. Before update on left, after update on right Following today's update, the Inbox by Gmail app will no longer display black bars at the top and the bottom of the app, with your list of emails taking up the full length of the screen. According to Google's release notes, no other new features were included in today's update. Google today also updated its standard Gmail app for iOS, introducing support for high-priority notifications for important messages. Inbox by Gmail can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link] Gmail can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Google Assistant's 'Continued Conversations' Rolling Out to Reduce Need for 'OK Google' Commands

Siri rival Google Assistant received a major update today across the Google Home speaker ecosystem with a feature Google revealed at I/O in May, called "Continued Conversation." Now, when you speak to Google Assistant and wake it up with a "Hey Google" or "OK Google" phrase, you don't need to repeat the phrase again for a follow-up request. For example, you can ask "Hey Google, what's the weather today?", and then follow up with "And what about tomorrow?" or "Can you remind me to bring an umbrella tomorrow morning?" When your thread of requests is finished, Google explains that you can say "thank you" or "stop" to end the conversation, but Google Assistant will also do this automatically if it detects you're no longer talking to it. Continued Conversations will need to be turned on in the Google Assistant app's Settings > Preferences > Continued Conversation. When starting up a new conversation you'll still need to say "OK Google" or activate a physical trigger every time, but the company hopes that reducing the instances you need to speak a wake-up phrase will result in more fluid and natural interactions with Google Assistant. In comparison, Apple's Siri still requires you to say "Hey Siri" every time a command is given, or by activating the AI assistant manually on iPhone or HomePod. Later this year, Apple will debut improvements to Siri in iOS 12 in the form of a new "Siri Shortcuts" feature, allowing iPhone owners to build customizable workflows and connect a variety of third-party apps and services under one voice command. Siri remains one of the

Google Photos Gains 'Favorite' Feature and Shared Album 'Hearts'

Google Photos is set to plug a couple of holes in its basic feature set over the next few days, bringing it in line with similar functions available in Apple Photos. Up until now, the cloud-based photo service has lacked the ability to favorite photos, but that's about to change. Google says it's rolling out an option for users to tap a star in the upper right of any photo in their library, and the photos will be automatically added to a new Favorites album. Google Photos will also soon let users "heart" photos that have been shared with them, which essentially functions the same way the "Like" button does in Apple's Shared Photo Albums, adding a touch of social interaction to the service. It’s OK to play favorites. Rolling out this week, tap the ⭐️ button to mark a photo as a favorite. Head to the Albums tab and view all your favorites in one place. pic.twitter.com/eWnSMDKQ72— Google Photos (@googlephotos) May 21, 2018 Google has promised additional Photos features powered by some AI innovations the company showcased at its I/O event earlier this month. They include suggested quick edits to improve images, color pop, and the ability to colorize old photos. Google Photos is a free download for iPhone and iPad available on the App Store. [Direct Link

Google News vs. Apple News on iOS

Google recently introduced a new Google News app with an entirely updated interface and a range of new features that put it on par with Apple's own News app, including a "For You" recommendation section and "Full Coverage" headlines that present a story from multiple angles. We went hands-on with Google News to check out the new features and to see how it compares to Apple News, the built-in news app that's available on the iPhone and the iPad. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. The Google News app is a reimagining and revamp to the existing Google Newsstand Play app that was previously available via the iOS App Store. It's been entirely overhauled though, with a simple, clean interface that's fairly similar to the look of Apple News with a dedicated navigation bar at the bottom. Google News does, however, have an additional section for quickly selecting news categories like U.S., World, Business, and Technology. Both apps feature a "For You" section based on personalized recommendations. Apple's draws in information from the categories and news sites you choose to follow, while Google presents a selection of stories that become more tailored over time based on what you choose to read and what you favorite. In each app, you can search for different news sites, blogs, and topics and add them to your coverage lists to impact "For You." Google's For You section highlights a list of five top stories and then provides supplemental stories at the bottom of the list, while Apple organizes For You into top stories, trending stories, top

New $10 YouTube Music Service to Launch Next Week, Replacing Google Play Music

Google is launching YouTube Music next week, shortly followed by YouTube Premium – a revamped version of its ad-free YouTube Red subscription service with a renewed focus on original programming. Announced on Wednesday in a blog post, the shake-up in services represents a splitting of the original YouTube Red subscription model, which gave users both ad-free music streaming and access to original video content for $10 a month. The new YouTube Music-only service will also cost $10 a month and replaces Google Play Music – existing subscribers will be migrated automatically (that includes non-paying users who have purchased music via Google Play or used the service to upload tracks and playlists). The rebranded service includes personalized playlists, intelligent search, support for background playback and music downloads for offline listening. The streaming service will also remove ads from music videos, but not the rest of YouTube. An ad-supported version of YouTube Music will be available for free. As part of the launch, Google is promising a "reimagined" mobile app and desktop player that's "designed for music". YouTube Music is a new music streaming service made for music: official songs, albums, thousands of playlists and artist radio plus YouTube’s tremendous catalog of remixes, live performances, covers and music videos that you can’t find anywhere else - all simply organized and personalized. For the first time, all the ways music moves you can be found in one place. YouTube Premium, meanwhile, will cost $12 a month, and includes all the benefits of