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'Facebook' How Tos

How to Remove Third-Party Accounts Like Facebook From Your Mac

With the release of iOS 11, Apple nixed its built-in integration with Twitter, Facebook, Flickr, and Vimeo, a feature that allowed iPhone and iPad users to store their third-party account information and access it within apps that needed to use those services. The equivalent feature remains in macOS High Sierra, although Apple has removed it completely from macOS 10.14 Mojave, which many users are likely to welcome in light of the recent data scandal.. While we wait for macOS Mojave to be released in the fall, this article shows you how to manually remove third-party accounts like Facebook from Macs running macOS 10.13. Note that the following guide only deletes associated third-party accounts at the system level of your Mac – you'll still be able to access your Facebook account and related data by logging into Facebook.com (where you can delete your account permanently) or via the official iOS app, for example.

'Facebook' Articles

Hackers Accessed Data From 29 Million Facebook Users

Two weeks ago, Facebook announced that it discovered a security breach allowing hackers to steal Facebook data from millions of accounts, and today, Facebook shared further data on just what was accessed. To get the Facebook data, hackers took advantage of a security flaw in the social network's "View As" code, a feature designed to let people see what their profile looks like to someone else. The Facebook access tokens that hackers were able to obtain are basically digital keys that allow people to stay logged in to Facebook. According to Facebook, hackers used a set of accounts that they controlled that were connected to Facebook friends. An automated technique was used to move from account to account, allowing them to collect access tokens in September 2018. Hackers were able to obtain timeline posts, friend lists, groups, and the names of recent Messenger conversations from an initial 400,000 people. People in this group who were Page admins of a Page that had received a message from someone on Facebook had the content of their messages stolen. After stealing data from the 400,000 people attacked first, Facebook used their friends list to steal access tokens for approximately 30 million people. For 15 million people, attackers were able to access name and contact details that include phone number and email address. For 14 million people, hackers were able to access the same information as well as other data that includes username, gender, location, relationship status, religion, hometown, current city, birthdate, device types used to access

Facebook Launches 3D Photos Feature That Uses Portrait Mode Images From iPhone

Facebook today announced the launch of a new 3D photos feature that uses the Portrait Mode feature of the iPhone and other smartphones with dual lens cameras. Facebook manipulates the Portrait Mode photo to display the scene in 3D, using the depth information between the subject in the foreground and the background. Whether it's a shot of your pet, your friends, or a beautiful spot from your latest vacation, you just take a photo in Portrait mode using your compatible dual-lens smartphone, then share as a 3D photo on Facebook where you can scroll, pan and tilt to see the photo in realistic 3D--like you're looking through a window.According to Facebook, 3D photos can be uploaded by starting a new post, tapping on the three dots for more options, and choosing the 3D photo option. Facebook has several tips for creating ideal 3D photos using Portrait Mode, including choosing scenes with a clear difference in depth between the subject and the background, taking advantage of high contrast, and capturing images with some texture. All Facebook users can view 3D photos in the News Feed and via VR starting today, with the ability to create and share 3D photos rolling out to all users over the coming

Facebook Debuts Video Conferencing Device 'Portal' Starting at $200

Facebook today announced "Portal," a new communications device for the home aimed at connecting friends and family members through video chat. There are two models of Portal: the 10-inch base model and a 15-inch "Portal+" model with a display that pivots between portrait and landscape modes. Each device includes AI technology, a Smart Camera, and Smart Sound. The Smart Camera follows where you move around a room and automatically pans and zooms to keep everyone in view, while Smart Sound minimizes background noise and enhances the voice of who is talking. Portal connects to your friends list on Facebook Messenger, and you can call them even if they don't have a Portal. Calls made via Portal will also be sent to Messenger apps on iOS and Android smartphones, and Portal supports group calls of up to seven people at the same time. The video calling device supports hands-free voice control, so you can start a video call by saying "Hey Portal" and following up with who you want to call. Alexa is built into the device, so you can also ask about the weather, news, traffic, control smart home products, and more on Portal. With Portal, you can listen to music together with a friend or even watch a television show with another Portal user, through connected partnerships with Spotify Premium, Pandora, iHeartRadio, Facebook Watch, Food Network, and Newsy. Portal video calls also support AR effects, filters, and stickers. In terms of audio, Facebook says Portal has two full-range drivers, while Portal+ has two tweeters with high-range frequency and a single 4" bass

Instagram Testing Feature That Would Provide Location History to Facebook

Facebook-owned social network Instagram is testing a feature that would allow location data collected by Instagram to be shared with Facebook, reports TechCrunch. A prototype Location History feature being tested within Instagram suggests that Location History data collected when Location Services is turned on in the Instagram app will be used to bolster Facebook's ad targeting. From the setting:Allows Facebook Products, including Instagram and Messenger, to build and use a history of precise locations received through Location Services on your devices.The feature was discovered by a TechCrunch reader who often digs into new functionality that Instagram is testing. Instagram's Location History test option collects GPS coordinates even when the app is not in use and adds them to Facebook's Activity Log, which is explained in a "Learn More" button within the Instagram app: "Location History is a setting that allows Facebook to build a history of precise locations received through Location Services on your device. When Location History is on, Facebook will periodically add your current precise location to your Location History even if you leave the app. You can turn off Location History at any time in your Location Settings on the app. When Location History is turned off, Facebook will stop adding new information to your Location History which you can view in your Location Settings. Facebook may still receive your most recent precise location so that you can, for example, post content that's tagged with your location. Location History helps you explore what's around

Facebook Uncovers 'Security Issue' Affecting Nearly 50 Million Accounts

Facebook this morning announced that its engineering team on Tuesday discovered that hackers have exploited a vulnerability in its code, allowing hackers to steal Facebook access tokens for almost 50 million accounts. According to Facebook, hackers took advantage of security flaws in its "View As" code, which is a feature designed to let people see what their profile looks like to someone else. The Facebook access tokens that were stolen are digital keys that allow people to stay logged in to Facebook. This attack exploited the complex interaction of multiple issues in our code. It stemmed from a change we made to our video uploading feature in July 2017, which impacted "View As." The attackers not only needed to find this vulnerability and use it to get an access token, they then had to pivot from that account to others to steal more tokens.It is not clear whether the accounts affected were misused or have had information accessed at this time, and Facebook does not know who executed the attacks. Facebook says that the vulnerability has been patched at this time, and authorities have been informed. Facebook has reset the access tokens of the nearly 50 million accounts that were affected along with another 40 million accounts that have been subject to a "View As" lookup in the last year. Customers who have been logged out of their apps will receive a message about what happened once they log back in. While a security review is conducted, Facebook is turning off the "View As" feature that was used for the hack. Facebook says that it is "sorry this

Instagram Expected to Become 'More Tightly Integrated' With Facebook After Photo App's Founders Leave Company

Instagram co-founders Kevin Systrom and Mike Krieger have left Facebook, explaining in a statement this week that they are taking some time off to "explore our curiosity and creativity again." According to people familiar with the matter speaking to Bloomberg, Systrom and Krieger are leaving due to growing tensions with Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg. Mike Krieger and Kevin Systrom at Instagram In recent months, Zuckerberg is said to have become more involved in the day-to-day work going on at Instagram, and "more reliant on Instagram in planning for Facebook's future." Facebook acquired Instagram in 2012, and up until now Systrom and Krieger had been able to keep the photo-sharing app's brand independent from Facebook while using the larger social network's resources to expand. With this year's Cambridge Analytica scandal, it's believed that Zuckerberg and Facebook are now leaning into Instagram's success as Facebook faces ongoing struggles. Facebook has even started talking about Instagram more often in its earning calls, with Zuckerberg recently stating that Instagram grew twice as fast being in the Facebook family as it could have on its own. Internally, Instagram employees said this was "unnecessary and unprovable." Adam Mosseri, who came from Facebook's news feed team to be head of product for Instagram in early 2018, is the most likely successor for Systrom and Krieger. Through all of this, Facebook is predicted to "more tightly integrate" Instagram into the larger company, making Instagram less independent than it is now. Without the founders around,

Facebook Removing Onavo VPN From App Store After Apple Says It Violates Data Collection Policies

Facebook today removed VPN app Onavo Protect from the iOS App Store after Apple decided that it violates App Store data collection policies, reports The Wall Street Journal. Apple earlier this month told Facebook officials that the Onavo app, which serves as a virtual private network, violates June App Store rules that prevent apps from harvesting data to build advertising profiles or contact databases. Earlier this month, Apple officials informed Facebook that the app violated new rules outlined in June designed to limit data collection by app developers, the person familiar with the situation said. Apple informed Facebook that Onavo also violated a part of its developer agreement that prevents apps from using data in ways that go beyond what is directly relevant to the app or to provide advertising, the person added.Facebook and Apple met last week to discuss the Onavo app, and last Thursday, Apple suggested that Facebook voluntarily remove the Onavo app, which Facebook agreed to do. Onavo, a free VPN, promised to "keep you and your data safe when you browse and share information on the web," but the app's real purpose was tracking user activity across multiple different apps to learn insights about how Facebook customers use third-party apps. Whenever a person using Onavo opens up an app or website, traffic is redirected to Facebook's servers, which log the action in a database to allow Facebook to draw conclusions about app usage from aggregated data. As of earlier this year, Onavo for iOS and Android had been installed on more than 33 million devices,

Facebook Fights US Government Demand to Break Messenger Encryption in Criminal Case

Facebook is contesting a demand from the U.S. government that it break the encryption of its popular Messenger app so that law enforcement can listen in to a suspect's conversations as part of an ongoing investigation into the MS-13 gang. The U.S. Department of Justice's demand is in relation to a case proceeding in a federal court in California that is currently under seal, so public files are unavailable. However, Reuters' sources said the judge in the case heard arguments on Tuesday on a government motion to hold Facebook in contempt of court for refusing to carry out the surveillance request. Facebook says it can only comply with the government's request if it rewrites the code relied upon by all its users to remove encryption or else hacks the government's current target, according to Reuters. Legal experts differed over whether the government would likely be able to force Facebook to comply. However, if the government gets its way in the case, experts say the precedent could allow it to make similar arguments to force other tech companies to compromise their encrypted communications services. Messaging platforms like Signal, Telegram, Facebook's WhatsApp and Apple's iMessage all use end-to-end encryption that prevents communications between sender and recipient from being accessed by anyone else, including the service providers. Tech companies have pushed back against previous attempts by authorities to break encryption methods, such as the FBI's request that Apple help it hack into the iPhone owned by Syed Farook, one of the shooters in the December

Facebook and Instagram Reveal Tools for Managing Your Time, Setting Reminders, and Limiting Notifications

Earlier in the summer, Facebook and Instagram each promised that users would soon be able to access a suite of digital health tools to help them manage their time on the social networks and promote healthier habits. Today, the companies revealed these tools in a press release and confirmed they will be rolling out to all mobile app users "soon." The tools will be found within the settings page on both iOS apps -- on Instagram it'll be called "Your Activity" and on Facebook it'll be called "Your Time on Facebook." At the top of the page, the activity dashboard will highlight your daily average time for each app on the device you have it installed on, and below that will be a bar graph detailing exactly how long you spent per day in each app over the last week. We developed these tools based on collaboration and inspiration from leading mental health experts and organizations, academics, our own extensive research and feedback from our community. We want the time people spend on Facebook and Instagram to be intentional, positive and inspiring. Our hope is that these tools give people more control over the time they spend on our platforms and also foster conversations between parents and teens about the online habits that are right for them. Below that is "Manage Your Time" section with a few features that focus on customizing push notifications. One is a "set daily reminder" option, which is an alert that notifies you when you've reached the amount of time you want to spend on Facebook or Instagram for that day. The other is for "notification settings," where you can

Facebook Launches 'Watch Party' Allowing Friends to View and Comment on Videos Together in Real Time

Facebook today announced the global launch of "Watch Party," a desktop and mobile feature revealed in May that allows Facebook Groups to join in and watch videos on the platform together in real time. The videos themselves can be previously recorded or live videos, and members in the Watch Party can comment and send reactions as the video plays. To start a Watch Party, one member (the "host") navigates to a Group page, taps the new Watch Party icon, writes a message, and finds videos to add to the playlist. From there, hosts can invite friends in the Group who can join instantly and watch the videos together. Only hosts can scrub the video's playback and choose new videos to watch. Facebook says it is looking into starting Watch Parties outside of Groups as well. Other features include a "co-host" ability, so that hosts can designate other members to control the Watch Party, and a crowdsource ability that lets all Watch Party members suggest videos for the host to play next. Facebook says Watch Parties are great for both small groups of friends and family members, as well as large organizations hosting Q&A sessions and more. Today, we’re launching Watch Party to all Facebook Groups around the globe. Watch Party is a new way for people to watch videos on Facebook together in real time. Once a Watch Party is started, participants can watch videos, live or recorded, and interact with one another around them in the same moment. We’ve been focused on building new ways to bring people together around video, create connections, and ignite conversations; Watch Party

Facebook Shuts Down 'Moves' Fitness Tracker and Two Other Apps Due to Low Usage

Facebook has announced it is shutting down three apps that the company either launched itself or acquired from other companies over the last four years. "Moves", "tbh", and the Android-only "Hello" all face the chop as part of the company's latest app cull. Facebook says the apps are being shuttered because of low usage. Activity tracking app Moves was popular at the time of its acquisition Fitness tracking app Moves was bought in 2014 from Helsinki-based company ProtoGeo Oy for an undisclosed amount. The app records daily activity, including walking, cycling, and running. Moves will shut down on July 31. British-based Midnight Labs sold its anonymous teen social media app tbh to the social network in 2017 for an undisclosed sum, although TechCrunch reported that the price paid was likely less than $100 million. Facebook says all user data associated with the apps will be deleted within 90 days following shutdown. We regularly review our apps to assess which ones people value most. Sometimes this means closing an app and its accompanying APIs. We know some people are still using these apps and will be disappointed — and we'd like to take this opportunity to thank them for their support. But we need to prioritize our work so we don’t spread ourselves too thin. And it's only by trial and error that we'll create great social experiences for people.Facebook's last app cull came in August 2017, when it removed two standalone apps from the iOS App Store: the high school chat app "Lifestage" and community-focused gathering place "Groups".

Facebook Testing Ability to Snooze Keywords for 30 Days

Facebook has confirmed to TechCrunch that it's testing an ability for its users to "snooze" certain keywords in their News Feed and groups for 30 days. The text-based snooze follows an update from late last year that introduced a way for users to snooze people, pages, and groups for 30 days. In order to start snoozing keywords, users will first have to come across a post that includes the keyword they want to avoid, as there's no dedicated section to enter keywords into. Facebook has said that a "preemptive snooze option" is being looked into and could be added in the next few weeks. Image via TechCrunch For now, once a post is spotted users will find a new "Snooze keywords in this post" option in the ellipsis drop-down menu. From there, Facebook will generate a list of nouns gathered from the post that are available to snooze for one month. TechCrunch gave one example of how this might work for avoiding spoilers in the World Cup: Tapping that reveals a list of nouns from the post you might want to nix, without common words like “the” in the way. So if you used the feature on a post that said “England won its World Cup game against Tunisia! Yes!”, the feature would pull out “World Cup”, “England”, and “Tunisia”. Select all that you want to snooze, and posts containing them will be hidden for a month. Currently, the feature only works on text, not images, and won’t suggest synonyms you might want to snooze as well. Ads won't be affected by snoozed keywords, so if you snooze something related to a movie the feature will only hide posts by friends and groups, but not

Facebook Confirms Development of Digital Health Time Tool for Mobile Apps

Facebook is working on its own in-house time usage insight dashboard, following in the footsteps of Apple's iOS 12 keynote at WWDC, which included the announcement of a "Screen Time" digital health feature. Discovered by Jane Manchun Wong (via TechCrunch), "Your Time on Facebook" shows a list of of how long you've spent on the Facebook app over the last week. This includes the average time you spent in the app per day, as well as the ability to set a limit to the amount of time you want to spend in the app, and an accompanying reminder about that limit. Confirming the feature is in testing, Facebook said, "We're always working on new ways to help make sure people's time on Facebook is time well spent." Image via @wongmjane In the image shared by Wong on Twitter, the text in the dashboard reads, "Time spent is counted while you're viewing the Facebook app on this phone," so it appears this feature will not count Facebook web browsing. The dashboard also has a shortcut for users to jump to a page that allows them to change their notification settings and turn on do not disturb. Although discovered within the Android app for Facebook, once "Your Time on Facebook" rolls out to a wide audience it's expected to launch across iOS and Android devices. Facebook-owned Instagram is also developing a "Time Spent" usage insights feature so users can see how long they spend in the app. In May, Instagram CEO Kevin Systrom said, "Understanding how time online impacts people is important, and it's the responsibility of all companies to be honest about this. We want to be part of

Facebook Messenger Expanding Chat Translation to All Users in United States and Mexico

Facebook today announced it is expanding chat translation within Messenger to all users in the United States and Mexico. When you receive a message in a language that is different from your default language in Messenger, Facebook's artificial intelligence assistant M will automatically offer a suggestion to translate the message. When you tap on the suggestion, you will be asked to enable auto-translation. Upon doing so, all future messages received that are not in your default language will be automatically translated. "This is a meaningful milestone for M Suggestions and will enable people to connect with people they would not be able to communicate with otherwise in a way that is seamless and natural," a Messenger spokesperson said. Auto-translation is enabled on a per-conversation basis, and all messages are shown in both the original language and translated version. You can opt-out of the feature at any time via the M Settings menu in Messenger, accessible by tapping your profile picture in the top-left corner of the app. At launch, M can translate from English to Spanish, and vice versa. Facebook plans to add other languages and countries in the future. Facebook first launched chat translation via M for users of its Marketplace service in the United States in early May. M Suggestions as a whole launched in April 2017, and are now available in 11 countries and five languages. At its F8 developer conference last month, Facebook previewed an upcoming redesign of Messenger, including a simplified user interface, a dark mode, and customizable chat

Facebook Leads Industry Design Lab Creating Simple Privacy Controls, Including Snapchat-Like 'Data Stories'

In its ongoing efforts to recover from the Cambridge Analytica scandal this spring, Facebook has detailed its collaboration with a design lab focused entirely on privacy and located in Dublin, Ireland. News of the lab comes from Facebook's responses to questions from the United States Senate that were released this week by the Senate commerce committee, and follow CEO Mark Zuckerberg's congressional hearings in April (via Bloomberg). The lab is called TTC labs -- "Trust, Transparency, and Control" -- and is a cross-industry program that aims to improve privacy controls for services like Facebook and many others. Facebook said that the lab was started "in recognition of the need for improved approaches to data transparency across all digital services." According to the lab's website it's been around for a while, so Facebook likely chose to highlight its partnership with the initiative to earn some favor during the congressional hearings. TTC labs was "initiated and supported by Facebook," and has more than 60 other organizations involved, although names are not given. The ultimate goal is said to be the creation of "people-centric" privacy practices that are user friendly and "easy to understand and control." In the latest blog post on the lab's site the group discusses how design can educate users about how their data is used, using "clear illustrations" to "effectively educate people about data flow and data connections in a step-by-step way." Other articles talk about "Building people's trust over time" and "Making cookies transparent." In another article,

Facebook Launches New 'Memories' Section for Reflecting on Old Photos, Posts and Life Events

Facebook today announced the launch of a dedicated "Memories" section on its social network, which the company says is designed to be a single place on Facebook to reflect on "the moments you've shared with family and friends." Memories, which is an expanded version of the current "On This Day" feature, provides a look back at posts and photos, friends you've made, and major life events. Facebook says the Memories page will integrate several sections, including "On This Day," which will continue to show posts and photos and "Friends Made On This Day," highlighting when you added a person as a friend. Recaps of Memories will also be included, featuring monthly recaps of memories that have been bundled into a message or a short video, and finally, the section will house "Memories You May Have Missed," highlighting new content if you haven't checked your memories lately. Facebook says that Memories will be customizable using built-in controls to hide content if desired.We know that memories are deeply personal -- and they're not all positive. We try to listen to feedback and design these features so that they're thoughtful and offer people the right controls that are easy to access. We work hard to ensure that we treat the content as part of each individual's personal experience, and are thankful for the input people have shared with us over the past three years.The new Memories section, which is rolling out, can be accessed through a Memories link, to the left of the News Feed when on a computer, and in the "More" tab on mobile

New Report Claims Facebook Gave Apple, Samsung, and Other Device Makers Deep Access to Data on Users and Friends

Facebook forged an agreement with at least 60 device makers including Apple and Samsung to provide access to large swathes of user data without explicit consent, in a move that may have violated a 2011 Federal Trade Commission consent decree. According to a lengthy report in The New York Times, the social network made the deals so that device makers could use APIs to include Facebook messaging functions, "Like" buttons, address books, and other features without requiring users to install a separate app. The deals were reportedly made over the last decade, starting before Facebook apps were widely available on smartphones. Most of the partnerships remain in effect, though Facebook began winding them down in April. However, in a recent test conducted by NYT on a 2013 Blackberry device, using a reporter's Facebook account, an app called "The Hub" was still able to harvest details on 558 of his friends, including their political and religious views. Not only that, the app was also able to access "identifying information" on 294,258 friends of his friends. Facebook has hit back against the claims in the report. In a blog post titled "Why We Disagree with The New York Times", the company said it created the APIs for device makers so that they could provide Facebook features on operating systems before apps or app stores where available. Given that these APIs enabled other companies to recreate the Facebook experience, we controlled them tightly from the get-go. These partners signed agreements that prevented people’s Facebook information from being used for any

Facebook Removing 'Trending' News Section Because People Found it 'Less and Less Useful'

Facebook today announced that it will remove its "Trending" section from the web and all mobile devices starting next week, in an effort to "make way for future news experiences." Facebook says that its users have found Trending "less and less useful," leading to the closure of the section, which stacks the latest news articles from the day into various categories. On the web, Trending is found on the right toolbar, but in iOS it's a bit more buried in the More tab > Explore > Trending News. Facebook launched the section in 2014, but it's since only been available in five countries and accounts for "less than 1.5 percent of clicks to news publishers on average." The removal of Trending will also mark the elimination of products and third-party partner integrations that rely on Trends API. We’re removing Trending soon to make way for future news experiences on Facebook. We’ve seen that the way people consume news on Facebook is changing to be primarily on mobile and increasingly through news video. So we’re exploring new ways to help people stay informed about timely, breaking news that matters to them, while making sure the news they see on Facebook is from trustworthy and quality sources. In its place, the social media company outlined three ways it will keep users in the know about breaking news. One is a "Breaking News Label," which is a simple indicator publishers can place on their posts in a user's News Feed, as well as breaking news notifications. There is also a test for a new "Today In" section to connect users to important news from local publishers in

Snapchat CEO on Facebook Copying Stories: They Should 'Copy Our Data Protection Practices Also'

Recode's annual Code Conference is underway in Rancho Palos Verdes, California this week, and on Tuesday Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel took the stage to discuss the ephemeral app's controversial update, Facebook's copying, and the recent Cambridge Analytica scandal. Specifically, Spiegel is said to have "poured salt on the wound" during his 40-minute interview with Kara Swisher as he called out Facebook and its ongoing struggles with user privacy. Referencing Facebook's decision to copy Snapchat stories in the Facebook app, Instagram, Facebook Messenger, and WhatsApp, Spiegel said, "We would really appreciate it if they copied our data protection practices also." Photo taken by Asa Mathat via Recode Snapchat is built around the idea that messages and photos that users send on the platform all disappear after a pre-set amount of time, providing some sense of security within the iOS and Android app. Facebook, on the other hand, is "just a bunch of features" -- now including ephemeral stories -- placed within an app without an underlying philosophy of user privacy, Spiegel argued. Spiegel said Facebook — whose name he repeatedly declined to utter — has failed to sufficiently overhaul its user privacy protections after the Cambridge Analytica scandal exploded earlier this spring. “Fundamentally, I think the changes have to go beyond window dressing to real changes to the ways that these platforms work,” he said. Spiegel ultimately said that he thinks Snapchat will survive competitors copying the app, because while other platforms are forcing people to "compete with

Facebook Marketplace Now Lets You Hire Home Service Professionals

Facebook today updated its mobile Marketplace to include home service professionals, such as house cleaners, plumbers, and contractors. The company says that Marketplace will integrate with existing service professional marketplaces like Handy, HomeAdvisor, and Porch to provide users with an all-in-one location for finding help around the house. In total, there will be hundreds of thousands of top-rated professionals available across the United States to browse through. Similar to other Facebook pages, professionals will have ratings, reviews, credentials, and their location to ensure that they're nearby. When you find multiple people who might be a match for your project, you can describe the task and use Messenger to send it to multiple professionals at once and judge their responses. According to Facebook, there have been an increasing number of users asking for recommendations related to home services, totaling "millions of people" since the beginning of 2018, leading to the launch of the new feature. The updated Facebook Marketplace is starting to roll out today on iOS and Android, and the social network says that it will be available for all U.S. users in the coming