Apple Health Records


'Apple Health Records' Articles

Health Records Firm Epic and About 60 Client Hospitals Object to Data Sharing Rules Supported by Apple

Health records firm Epic Systems and some 60 client hospitals are objecting to a proposed U.S. government policy that would make it easier for patients to share medical records data with apps, an initiative supported by Apple and other tech companies (via CNBC). Proposed by the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) in 2019, the modified data sharing rules would allow patients to share private clinical data from their healthcare providers and make it more accessible to health apps via APIs. Currently, patients often have difficulty trying to obtain their information, with clinical data stored on physical media and processed through medical record software marketed to hospitals by the likes of Epic. According to one report, an Epic installation can cost upwards of $1 billion for a major health system to implement. Yet in a letter to the HHS Secretary Alex Azar, Epic and signatories argue that the pending initiative on interoperability will be "overly burdensome on our health system and will endanger patient privacy." Instead, Epic's letter recommends changes to the proposed rules, including extra clarity around health information related to family members and a longer timeline for the "development of new technology required by the rule," up from 1 year to 3 years. "While we support HHS' goal of empowering patients with their health data and reducing costs through the 21st Century Cures Act, we are concerned that ONC's Proposed Rule on interoperability will be overly burdensome on our health system and will endanger patient privacy. Specifically, the

U.S. Veterans Can Now Use Apple's Health Records Feature

Apple today announced that its partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to roll out access to the Health Records feature for iPhone has launched, with veterans who receive care through the VA now able to access their information right in the Health app on iOS. “Helping veterans gain a better understanding of their health is our chance to show our gratitude for their service,” said Jeff Williams, Apple’s chief operating officer. “By working with the VA to offer Health Records on ‌iPhone‌, we hope to help those who served have greater peace of mind that their health care is in good hands.”Apple announced the initiative back in February, but it's taken a number of months to get everything in place to launch it to country's largest medical system covering over 9 million veterans at over 1,200 medical

Apple's Health Records Feature Will Be Available Soon to U.S. Veterans

Apple today announced that its Health Records feature on iPhone will be available soon to military veterans across the United States. In partnership with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs, American veterans receiving care through the Veterans Health Administration will be able to view their aggregated health records directly in the Health app on their ‌iPhone‌. Apple CEO Tim Cook:We have great admiration for veterans, and we're proud to bring a solution like Health Records on ‌iPhone‌ to the veteran community. It's truly an honor to contribute to the improved healthcare of America's heroes.Apple introduced the Health Records feature in iOS 11.3 in March 2018, allowing patients to view their medical records from multiple participating hospitals and clinics directly in the Health app on the ‌iPhone‌, including allergies, vital signs, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, and procedures. More than 100 institutions in the U.S. support Apple Health Records, including Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles and Johns Hopkins in Baltimore. UC San Diego Health recently conducted a survey about Apple Health Records and found that 78 percent of patients were "satisfied with using the feature", according to the Journal of the American Medical

One Drop Glucose Monitor Gains Personal Diabetes Assistant and Health Records Integration

One Drop, a company known for its iPhone-connected One Drop Blood Glucose Monitor, today announced the launch of a new Personal Diabetes Assistant and integration with the Health Records feature on iPhone. The One Drop Personal Diabetes Assistant is designed to encourage One Drop users to better adhere to medication times, eating plans, and blood glucose monitoring. Users can get regular reminders for blood glucose checks, medication doses, meals, physical activities, weigh-ins, and blood pressure measurements, with the app providing a daily personalized schedule based on each person's needs and a progress chart towards health goals. With the Health Records integration, One Drop users at participating healthcare institutions are able to access medical records in the Health app alongside their One Drop info for a better overview of total health. One Drop users who are subscribed to the company's One Drop Experts service can share electronic medical records with their personal diabetes coach, giving coaches access to vitals, labs, and medication history for better diabetes management recommendations. For those unfamiliar with One Drop, the company makes an affordable Bluetooth-connected blood glucose monitoring device, a lancing device, and a subscription service for lancets and glucose strips. Apple offers the One Drop Blood Glucose Monitoring Kit online for

Survey Finds 78% of Patients Satisfied With Apple Health Records at UC San Diego Hospital

UC San Diego Health recently sent an online survey to its first 425 patients who activated Apple Health Records in 2018, and among 132 respondents, 78 percent indicated that they were "satisfied with using the feature." 96 percent of respondents said they could "easily connect their mobile devices to the platform," and 90 percent said the "smartphone solution improved their understanding of their own health, facilitated conversations with their clinicians, or improved sharing of personal health information with friends and family." The survey results were published in the Journal of the American Medical Association this week by doctors at UC San Diego Health, one of the first hospitals and clinics to make Apple Health Records available to its patients. Apple introduced the Health Records feature in iOS 11.3 in March 2018, allowing patients to view their medical records from multiple participating hospitals and clinics directly in the Health app on the iPhone, including allergies, vital signs, conditions, immunizations, lab results, medications, and procedures. The journal submission cautions that, as with many new products and solutions, such enthusiasm is common from early adopters. The platform will need to "prove that it is useful, sustainable, scalable, and actually improves health outcomes," according to Christian Dameff, MD, UC San Diego Health. As noted by CNBC's Christina Farr, hospitals have historically faced "major challenges" with getting patients to use electronic medical records because the technology "tends to be poorly designed and hard to