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iPhone's Force Touch Tech May Track Contact Area Instead of Pressure, New 4" Model Unlikely in 2015

iphone6-stock-photoKGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who has a respectable track record at reporting on Apple's upcoming plans, issued a note to investors on Thursday that claims the next-generation iPhone will have a FPC-made capacitive Force Touch sensor under the backlight, laminated with metal shielding. Kuo adds that the change may be significant enough for Apple to call its next iPhone the "iPhone 7" instead of the so-called "iPhone 6s."

The analyst claims that the hardware design of Force Touch will be different than the technology used in the Apple Watch and 12-inch Retina MacBook. Instead of directly detecting the pressure applied by fingers, the new improved Force Touch hardware will monitor the contact area where a finger presses to determine how much pressure is being applied. The sensor will use capacitive technology and thin FPC material to save space.
"We believe that iPhone’s Force Touch sensor doesn’t directly detect the pressure applied by fingers. Instead, it monitors the contact area on which the finger touches the screen to decide how big the pressure is.

There are two possible structural designs for Force Touch from a technology viewpoint. The Force Touch sensor can either be placed between the cover lens and the In-cell touch panel or under the In-cell touch panel’s backlight. In the first position, the technological challenge lies with how to produce the transparent Force Touch sensor; in the second position, the challenge is how to reduce signal interference from in-cell touch panel. Our understanding of the technology is that producing a transparent Force Touch sensor is more difficult, so the chances are the new iPhone this year will opt for the second position."
Kuo adds that Apple is likely to change the hardware design of Force Touch again in 2016 by removing the metal shielding to achieve a thinner form factor. He notes that the changes should improve the iPhone user experience, but will likely create uncertainty for Force Touch module suppliers TPK and GIS, as well as metal shielding suppliers Minebea, Hi-P and Jabil.

Force Touch iPhone KGI copy
Kuo claims that Apple is still targeting 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch models for its next-generation iPhones, akin to the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, and notes that a 4-inch model is unlikely to be released this year. KGI Securities estimates iPhone shipments will total 25 to 30 million units in the third quarter, helping drive momentum for Force Touch components within the supply chain.



Top Rated Comments

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19 months ago
Is that possible without calibration? A small finger pushing hard would register the same area as a larger finger pressing soft. I can't imagine it working like that.
Rating: 20 Votes
19 months ago

4 inches is just too small for a smartphone. There is a reason why 4.7 and up is the standard now. Because it is more practical.


Disagree. 4.7 gives me a bit more usable screen in exchange for losing 1 handed use. Not a good trade off (for me).
Rating: 17 Votes
19 months ago
NOOO!!! I want a 4 inch phone :'(

My iPhone 5 better last a long time, because its looking more and more like my last.

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4 inches is just too small for a smartphone. There is a reason why 4.7 and up is the standard now. Because it is more practical.


Its a matter of how you use your phone. 80 percent of my phone usage would be 1 handed, which i can't do with the 6 making it useless and impractical for me. 4 inches is the perfect size.

They really should offer a 4,4.7 and 5.5 lnch range and that would satisfy everyone.
Rating: 13 Votes
19 months ago
No new 4" = no purchase. I never thought id sit a generation out. Much less two. But the iPhone 5S is still by far the most appealing iPhone to me.
Rating: 12 Votes
19 months ago

Is that possible without calibration? A small finger pushing hard would register the same area as a larger finger pressing soft. I can't imagine it working like that.


Exactly...I don't really believe this rumor because then even the original iPhone could have "Force Touch" - the capacitive screen already detects the entire contact area and the OS decides the center point to tell the app.
Rating: 9 Votes
19 months ago
4 inches is just too small for a smartphone. There is a reason why 4.7 and up is the standard now. Because it is more practical. I don't think Apple is going back to 4 inches. With the iPhone 6 and 6+ success, there is no going back to smaller phones.
Rating: 8 Votes
19 months ago

4 inches is just too small for a smartphone. There is a reason why 4.7 and up is the standard now. Because it is more practical.


human habits. I got used to it so quickly I wouldn't mind trying out a 5.5 plus right now even though I found 4.7 big enough months ago tbh. the 4.0 feels like a tiny toy in my hands now
Rating: 7 Votes
19 months ago

Is that possible without calibration? A small finger pushing hard would register the same area as a larger finger pressing soft. I can't imagine it working like that.


Yeah that didn't make sense to me either. I do hope they skip straight to 7 though. Or just stop numbering them.
Rating: 3 Votes
19 months ago

4 inches is just too small for a smartphone. There is a reason why 4.7 and up is the standard now. Because it is more practical. I don't Apple is going about 4 inches. With the iPhone 6 and 6+ success, there is no going back to smaller phones.


A 4" smartphone is the ideal size for me.

The 6 and 6+ are way too big for my needs.

If there is no 4" option somewhere in the lineup I'll just keep my 5S until the wheels fall off, then replace it with another 5S.
Rating: 3 Votes
19 months ago

Sorry 4"ers, the market has spoken.


Has it? I don't see how that's proved unless and until Apple offers a 4" with equivalent specs to the flagship devices and the 4" doesn't sell.
Rating: 2 Votes

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