Sonnet Echo 15 Docking Stations Delayed for Thunderbolt 2 Upgrade

In an email to customers, hardware upgrade company Sonnet has announced yet another shipment delay for its Echo 15 and Echo 15 Pro+ Thunderbolt docking stations. Unveiled in April 2013, the hardware is still in the pre-order stage. The latest delay is the result of a company decision to upgrade the device to support Thunderbolt 2.0. sonnet-dock-2
Following our last Echo 15 and Echo 15 Pro+ Thunderbolt Dock status update, we received very positive feedback and valuable input that confirms these products were designed with the right feature sets. However, there has been an increasingly louder chorus of requests for them to be based on Thunderbolt 2 technology. We carefully considered this input, and, combined with recent clarification of requirements for Windows Thunderbolt compatibility, we have decided to upgrade these products to use Thunderbolt 2 chipsets.
The Thunderbolt dock features a DVD or Blu-ray reader/burner, a 2.5" or 3.5" SATA drive bay (6 Gb/s) as well as a variety of ports for USB 3.0, SATA, eSATA, FireWire 800, audio input and output, and Gigabit Ethernet connections.

The Sonnet Echo 15 dock can be pre-ordered for $400 with a DVD drive and $450 with a Blu-ray drive. Different capacity hard drives are available as an optional add-on. The Echo 15 Pro+ starts at $550 while upgrading to a Blu-ray burner and adding space for a second solid-state drive.

(Thanks, Dan!)

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12 months ago
If they announce Thunderbolt 3 soon, we can delay it again and keep the cycle going. Sometimes you just have to ship a product, there will always be something better coming along...
Rating: 5 Votes
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12 months ago
I wish the darn thing looked nicer. It looks too "PC" like for my taste.
Rating: 4 Votes
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12 months ago
Waaay too much for what basically is a hub.
Rating: 3 Votes
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12 months ago
I ordered one the beginning of April 2013.. and have suffered through number of delays, getting by with a USB3 hub. The last one almost guaranteed a Nov-December delivery. Now delivery over a year after the announcement... kinda typical for Sonnet? Next they will cancel. I suspect they could not get it to work right and they are hoping that TB 2 will either solve their issue or perhaps is just a good excuse. So instead of delivering a poorly performing product, they will just stop development. Too bad, as it has (or had) the right feature set for me.

By the way, I did not get an email with this announcement.
Rating: 3 Votes
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12 months ago

Waaay too much for what basically is a hub.


it's all a matter of what value you get out of it. my first CD-burner was $1200, by NEC.

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didnt even know theres a tb 2. dead technology for the mass imo


completely wrong. it's just not designed for you, as your ignorance to its existence details.
Rating: 3 Votes
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12 months ago

Why not leave out the DVD drive and let users add an external (if they ever need one) via USB or whatever?


Hell, that's the main reason I was looking at this. Nice to have it internal instead of having another external case.
Rating: 3 Votes
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12 months ago
I like it. It's an ideal solution for Mac Pro.
Rating: 2 Votes
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12 months ago

Waaay too much for what basically is a hub.


If you have a Mac that cost a couple of thousand $ and some gear that cost a couple of thousand, this is a cost-effective solution.

If you think it's too expensive, then you don't really need it. I have no need for this but I also don't really need it.
Rating: 2 Votes
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12 months ago
Nice product. Worth the wait for the upgrade. Will look great next to my nMP.:D
Rating: 1 Votes
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12 months ago

If you have a Mac that cost a couple of thousand $ and some gear that cost a couple of thousand, this is a cost-effective solution.

If you think it's too expensive, then you don't really need it. I have no need for this but I also don't really need it.


I don't know if I can agree with the message implied here that just because you spent a couple thousand on your Mac, you must therefore have several thousand more to spend on peripherals and must be willing to spend and pay whatever amount it takes for something which may give you more utility or convenience without concern for cost. Even somebody with thousands more to spend after spending "a couple of thousand" for the Mac would want to draw the line somewhere on what is and is not worth the money vs. worth the convenience (cost/benefit factor). At least, the cost involved here would have to make them think twice about it.

The corollary here seems to be if you want or need "it", you should not be concerned about the price, just perceived satisfaction. So, don't moan or complain about cost, pay whatever it takes, or just step aside for those that will pay it without concern. That is what people used to say about the Rolls-Royce, and look what happened to that firm (almost went bankrupt and had to be bought out)!

This seems a bit elitist, as many "little" people who use Mac hardware and software don't necessarily spend thousands on a computer with a built-in limited useful lifespan with careless abandon, or spent what limited funds they had just to get "into the game" with a computer and system they feel can provide a more enjoyable experience than alternatives like Windows. Not everybody is a "pro" who can write off any costs on taxes or justify an addition that can be written off without concern for costs as a business expense. Actually, I don't know of any business that can survive with that "spend with no limit or concern" policy without spending themselves into a very nicely equipped bankruptcy. Real business needs to contain costs and invest profits back into growing the business, not increased spending for tech toys. (Don't give me that "if I save 10 seconds a day, I will save 300 seconds a month-that's real money!" stuff. The time saved will be wasted waiting by the coffee machine anyway:) )

This device is not strictly for a high end new Mac Pro, is it? Isn't it for Thunderbolt equipped computers in general? For instance, if you have a Mac Mini with Thunderbolt port, and want to add a SSD without removing or rebuilding the case, or, a student with a MacBook Air who wants to doc the computer after a day of classes, or an office worker with a MacBook Pro used in a home office, or any other ordinary day-to-day Mac user...are they not intended targeted customers for this product? Or, is it strictly for the person who spends thousands on a computer and then wants to spend thousands more without concerns for what it costs.

My point is, this docking port is very expensive. Now the company making it has the right to charge whatever they want, or whatever the market will bear (that's business!), and decide to withhold it for as long as they want until every possible enhancement can be accounted for disregarding revenue stream (because as they say, there is a ground swell of public reaction demanding Thunderbolt 2 capability, who would rather wait then settle, and they apparently care so deeply for their potential client's wants they are willing to delay release until the lily is guilded), and that's fine. That still does not change the fact this costs alot. So much so that many won't even consider it regardless of benefit becasue their limited budget needs to be spent (or saved) for something else, like the next Apple hardware version release, or some useful software, or a digital camera, or whatever, and reject this item regardless of how useful it might have been to them because it ties up too much saved/reserved cash. Or, it just hurts to have to spend this much for so little. These are customers this company is snubbing by setting the price at such a high level. Businesses in general don't normally want to do that, unless they intentionally want to limit the potential market for the product because of a high break even point in manufacturing costs pays them to limit production (and they are really seeming to be limiting production by sliding that release date further and further from the original target, aren't they!).

You may not care if you have no intention of buying this in the first place, but if you did have a use for this dock, and you are otherwise interested, or just plain don't care to be ripped off by Sonnet just because they can, then you may just want to express that the cost for this peripheral is just not worth it. You may also come to the conclusion that Thunderbolt, although a promising technology, is just too expensive to be practical for any peripheral to sell at volumes permitting reduced unit costs, there are less expensive alternatives (like USB 3.0 and others to yet come) that will set the standards because they can gain market traction in numbers large enough to establish a standard, and Thunderbolt (1 or 2) is destined to be doomed to an early death because it can only be afforded and used by the elite who need not concern themselves about costs, only wants.
Rating: 1 Votes
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