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'OLED' Articles

Samsung Expected to Begin iPhone X Plus Display Production in May

Samsung will begin manufacturing OLED displays for a new iPhone X and iPhone X Plus next month, according to Taiwan's Economic Daily News. Mockup of iPhone X and iPhone X Plus alongside iPhone 7 Plus via Reddit user SpaceKonk The report claims Samsung will restart its production line in May, with plans to double its production capacity in June. The timeline appears to be slightly ahead of schedule, as it was supposedly believed that Samsung would not begin production until the end of June, or the beginning of the third quarter. The report is a good sign that Apple's widely rumored trio of 2018 smartphones will be released simultaneously, including a new iPhone X, a larger iPhone X Plus, and a mid-range LCD model with Face ID. The new smartphone lineup will likely be announced in early September and available to order later in the month. This would contrast with Apple's staggered release of the iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X last year. While all three models were unveiled in September, iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus pre-orders began September 15, while iPhone X pre-orders didn't begin until October 27, nearly a month and a half later. The delayed launch of the iPhone X was attributed to reported production challenges with the TrueDepth camera system powering Face ID. Those issues have since been resolved, and shouldn't have any effect on the 2018 launch. All in all, getting your hands on Apple's flagship new smartphone may be quicker and easier this fall. But, as with any iPhone launch, pre-order availability will likely be limited, so early adopters will

Second-Generation iPhone X Estimated to Cost Apple Up to 10% Less to Manufacture

Apple has managed to reduce the manufacturing cost of its iPhone X successor to a level much lower than the current flagship model, according to DigiTimes' research analyst Luke Lin. Lin cited information from Apple's upstream supply chain as indicating that the new device's MBOM [manufacturing bill of materials] will be more than 10% lower than that for iPhone X. He added that the MBOM of the iPhone X was more than US$400 in 2017.Apple is rumored to be introducing three iPhones in 2018: The first is said to be a second-generation version of the iPhone X, with the same 5.8-inch OLED display, while the second can be thought of as an "iPhone X Plus" with a larger 6.5-inch OLED display. Apple is also reportedly planning to introduce a new, more affordable 6.1-inch iPhone with an LCD display. However, recent engineering samples from the 5.8-inch device are said to show components with lower-level specifications or lower capacities than those of the 6.1-inch LCD iPhone, with LPDDR memory being one of the major differences. According to Lin, the cost reduction could see Apple position the new 5.8-inch device as the cheapest model of all three next-generation iPhone models. The analyst also believes a project to develop a 5.8-inch LCD iPhone has been suspended since the end of the Lunar New Year holidays in mid-February and may be eventually terminated. Lin reckons weak demand for iPhone X meant Apple needed a lot less OLED panels from Samsung than it said it would, which gave the Korean firm more bargaining power with regards to panel quotes for the next generation of

Apple Likely to Buy 270 Million Display Panels for 2018 iPhone Lineup

Apple plans to order between 250 and 270 million display panels for its iPhone lineup this year, according to sources within Taiwan's panel industry. Around half that number will consist of OLED panels, to be shared among current-model iPhone X orders, a second-generation model, and a larger 6.5-inch iPhone, according to DigiTimes. Apple's purchases of OLED panels in 2018 will reach 110-130 million units, including 70-80 million 5.9-inch units for the current iPhone X and an upgraded version of the same size. The remaining will be 40-50 million 6.5-inch OLED panels for the production of a less expensive model, said the sources.Given the wording in the above quote from today's DigiTimes article, the "5.9-inch" reference could be overlooked as a typo, but claiming the 6.5-inch OLED panels are for a "less expensive model" seems off the mark. Several reliable sources claim Apple is readying a second-generation version of the iPhone X with the same 5.8-inch OLED display, along with a larger "Plus" size with a 6.5-inch display. Design wise, both the 5.8-inch iPhone and 6.5-inch iPhone coming in 2018 are expected to look similar to the current iPhone X, with an edge-to-edge display and notch for the TrueDepth camera, glass bodies for wireless charging support, and dual-lens rear cameras. Along with these two OLED iPhones, which will likely be just as expensive as the current iPhone X, Apple is however said to be planning to introduce a new, more affordable 6.1-inch iPhone with an LCD display, according to reports. DigiTimes claims 60 to 70 million Low-Temperature

Chinese Smartphone Makers Plan for Mini LED Supply as Apple Expected to Control Majority of OLED Production This Year

Apple's domination of the OLED supply chain is one of the reasons why three Chinese smartphone makers are seeking out alternative display technology in future handsets, according to a report today by DigiTimes. Huawei, Oppo, and Xiaomi are planning to adopt mini LED-backlit panels in smartphones launched later in 2018. The three companies believe that Apple "may extend use of AMOLED panels" to iPhones coming in 2018 and occupy even more of Samsung Display's production of the OLED displays. Apple's entry in smartphone OLED displays began with the manufacturing of the iPhone X last year and is expected to increase in 2018 with the second-generation iPhone X and 6.5-inch "iPhone X Plus," which should lead Apple to significantly increase OLED display orders thanks to the larger size. The company has also implemented OLED displays into the Apple Watch. Instead of attempting to fight for OLED display supply against Apple, the China-based smartphone makers are turning towards mini LED this year. The companies have reportedly asked Taiwan-based suppliers to begin producing mini LED backlighting in June 2018 in anticipation of products that would debut in the second half of 2018. Industry sources noted that technological advances in mini LED product designs have the potential to cut production costs, further boosting the smartphone makers' readiness to adopt the technology. Besides Samsung Display, a report earlier in the month suggested that Apple will add LG Display to its OLED supply chain to help build 6.5-inch panels for the iPhone X Plus. Samsung was the sole

iPhone X Plus Should Lead Apple to Significantly Increase OLED Display Orders Next Year

Samsung Display will supply Apple with between 180 and 200 million flexible OLED displays for the iPhone in 2018, up from an estimated 50 million this year, according to The Korea Herald's sister publication The Investor. While the report focuses on the iPhone X, it's likely that a portion of the OLED displays will go towards the "iPhone X Plus" rumored to launch alongside the second-generation iPhone X in the second half of 2018. iPhone X Plus mockup by Benjamin Geskin via iDrop News Like the Galaxy Note 8, the iPhone X Plus is expected to have a 6.4-inch display, but its overall physical size will likely be closer to an iPhone 8 Plus. Meanwhile, the next iPhone X will likely retain its 5.8-inch display. With both a full year of iPhone X sales and the addition of the iPhone X Plus to the lineup in 2018, Apple will undoubtedly need many more OLED displays, so today's report about Samsung quadrupling its production next year makes sense. Samsung could reportedly gain an extra $22 billion in revenue from the orders. The report also claims Samsung has achieved around a 90 percent yield rate, compared to around 60 percent earlier this year, meaning it is getting more efficient at making OLED displays that live up to Apple's strict quality standards. This could lead to improved shipping estimates for next year's launch. The new iPhone X and iPhone X Plus will likely launch around the usual timeframe of September to October, potentially alongside a new 6.1-inch mid-range model with an LCD display that is predicted to start at around $649 to $749. There's no

More Smartphone Vendors Likely to Adopt OLED Panels if Burn-in Issue Can Be Solved

OLED panels are expected to penetrate up to 30 percent of the smartphone display market by 2018 through increasing adoption by smartphone vendors, according to industry sources (via DigiTimes). The supply of OLED panels will remain constrained in the first half of 2018 as Samsung Display will continue to be the sole supplier that can mass-produce the panels, while rivals including LG Display, Japan Display (JDI) and Sharp may start volume production of OLED panels in the second half of 2018 at the earliest, indicated the sources.Tellingly, that penetration rate could climb higher if the burn-in issue related to OLED panels could be solved, according to cited sources. Multiple reports surfaced in October about potential screen burn-in or image retention issues with Google's new Pixel 2 XL smartphone. For its part, Apple says the iPhone X has been engineered to be the "best in industry" at reducing burn-in effects, but a support document published by Apple suggests burn-in is still a problem that some users could potentially see over time. Apple will launch a trio of new iPhone models in 2018, including 5.8-inch and 6.5-inch models with OLED displays and a 6.1-inch model with an LCD display, according to respected KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo. Apple has reportedly also expressed interest in buying advanced LCD panels from Japan Display for use in some of its iPhones next year. OLED displays offer sharper contrast and brighter colors than traditional LCD panels, but cost and supply issues are an ongoing concern for Apple, and are likely to slow down any

Samsung Expected to Earn $4B More Making iPhone X Parts Than Galaxy S8 Parts

Samsung looks on course to earn around $4 billion more in revenue making parts for the iPhone X than from the parts it makes for its own flagship Galaxy S8 handset, according to new research revealed on Monday. An analysis conducted by Counterpoint Technology for The Wall Street Journal based its prediction on projected sales in the 20 months after the new iPhones go on sale November 3. According to CounterPoint, the reason for the chosen time window is that the majority of sales for a new smartphone typically occur in the first 20 months after its debut. Counterpoint expects Apple will sell 130 million iPhone X units, earning Samsung $110 on each through the summer of 2019, while Galaxy S8's global sales are expected to be 50 million, earning Samsung $202 each from components such as displays and chips in its first 20 months of sales, according to estimates based on a projected bill of materials. The Counterpoint analysis includes parts sales from Samsung Electronics plus two Samsung affiliates that make batteries and capacitors.Apple and Samsung are expected to be the world's two most profitable companies in 2017, excluding Chinese banks, according to S&P Global Market Intelligence. Samsung's components operation stands to make billions of dollars supplying the OLED screens and NAND flash memory chips for the new iPhone. Meanwhile, Apple hopes its new iPhone 8 and iPhone X range will boost its smartphone sales, which accounted for two-thirds of the company's $215.64 billion revenue in fiscal 2016, according to investment bank CLSA. WSJ reports that Apple and

Apple Reportedly Investing Billions in LG to Make OLED Displays for Future iPhones

Apple is widely expected to introduce its first iPhone with an OLED display later this year, after a decade of using solely LCD technology. Earlier reports peg Samsung as the exclusive supplier of OLED displays for the high-end smartphone, as the only company that can reliably produce both the quantity and quality of panels that Apple demands. That could change within a few years, however, as Apple has decided to invest 3 trillion won/$2.67 billion in LG's OLED production for smartphones, according to The Investor, citing a Korea Economic Daily newspaper report. Apple will reportedly make the investment as advance payment for the planned OLED display supplies from the Korean display maker. The iPhone maker is said to secure 45,000 panels per month for future iPhones from 2019. Apple always aims to diversify its supply chain in order to secure lower prices and reduce the risk of relying on one supplier, so it's easy to see why the iPhone maker appears to be willing to help LG ramp up OLED display production. Reports about Apple's potential investment first surfaced earlier this month, after the companies allegedly tentatively agreed upon the investment plans, and it now appears that a deal has been or is nearly finalized. LG is likely to build a production line dedicated to iPhone orders only, as part of its agreement with Apple, according to The Investor. It is frequently rumored that Apple will introduce a trio of new iPhone models later this year, including iterative iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus models with LCDs and the so-called "iPhone 8" or

LG Display Plans $13 Billion OLED Investment Over Next Three Years

Earlier in July, a report by The Korea Herald suggested that Apple and supplier LG Display were working on a deal that would see Apple investing $1.75-2.62 billion into LG Display's OLED manufacturing, specifically a plant that would be exclusively devoted to Apple orders. Today, Reuters has provided a few more details on LG Display's plans to enter the OLED display market for smartphones, which rival Samsung Display currently dominates. In total, LG Display plans to invest $13.5 billion into boosting its output of OLED screens over the next three years, covering TV screens and specifically hoping to "make inroads against rival Samsung in smartphone displays." LG Display is already the OLED leader in large-screen television displays, but now the supplier is said to be seeking a strong foothold in the OLED screen market for smartphones, coming in the wake of OLED-backed iPhone 8 rumors and Apple's reported plans to go OLED-only on iPhones beginning in 2019, and perhaps even 2018. LG Display will invest around $4.5 billion for a new production line that will create flexible OLED panels to help bolster its position in the auto display and smartphone market, and another $2.5 billion will be saved for another line of "large-size OLED screens." In regards to lines dedicated to small and mid-sized OLED displays, it's said that Apple will help out with getting the lines up and running, continuing the investment rumors began earlier this month. Around 5 trillion won is earmarked for a new line for flexible OLED aimed at bolstering its position in auto displays and

Apple Buys Specialist Machinery to Set Up OLED Panel R&D Line in Taiwan

Apple has acquired specialist machinery from Sunic System to build its own OLED panel research and development line in Taiwan, according to a report on Monday. Korea-based Sunic manufactures systems for OLED display production and supply for both pilot and mass production lines. According to ET News, Apple has purchased chemical vapor deposition (CVD) machines from the company to reduce its reliance on Chinese suppliers as it ramps up its R&D into OLED panel and related technology. CVD is a technique for the fabrication and synthesis of thin films of polymeric materials, which have a broad range of application, including the production of OLED panel coatings with barrier properties. Japanese Canon Tokki is currently the primary supplier of CVD machines and is said to ship the bulk of its output to Samsung, the biggest producer of OLED panels, but Apple's acquisition of the machines from Sunic could undermine Canon Tokki's dominant position in the CVD market going forward. Samsung has bought five sets of OLED manufacturing equipment from Canon Tokki so far in 2017 and has signed contracts to buy five out of 10 such machines to be rolled out by the Japan-based machinery company in 2018, said the Commercial Times.Samsung's own CVD purchases likely feed into its plan to construct the world's biggest OLED display manufacturing plant, which could begin mass production in 2019. Apple has reportedly signed a two-year contract with the Korean company for the supply of up to 92 million curved OLED panels, at least some of which are expected to be used in this year's

Apple Reportedly Investing in LG Display's New OLED Plant, Will Be Solely Devoted to iPhones

While Samsung remains the world's the dominant supplier of OLED panels and will supply Apple with up to 92 million OLED screens over the next two years, a new report today suggests that Apple is looking to diversify its supply chain by investing $1.75-2.62 billion into LG Display's OLED manufacturing. Specifically, Apple and LG Display are said to be considering a deal that would funnel Apple's investment into LG Display's new "E6" OLED plant, which would be "exclusively dedicated to Apple orders" (via The Korea Herald). LG Display's production on OLED screens is still far off, with its output for Apple predicted to start sometime in early 2019, which still places Samsung as the reigning supplier of OLED components for Apple over the next few years. No deal between Apple and LG Display is confirmed yet, with the companies having "tentatively" agreed upon the investment plans and more finalized details expected to come later in the month. Apple is reportedly in talks with LG Display to invest about 2 to 3 trillion won (US$1.75-2.62 billion) into the Korean display maker’s new OLED production lines exclusively dedicated to Apple orders. “Samsung Display is the only display maker that meets Apple’s strict quality criteria for now,” said an industry source on condition of anonymity. “LG Display is said to be meeting about 70 percent level of the requirements, while Chinese display makers are still struggling to catch up with that of LG.” For the 2017 line of iPhones, rumors have been pointing towards the "iPhone 8" as having an OLED screen, while the iPhone 7s and

Samsung Planning to Build World's Largest OLED Display Factory

Samsung Display is planning to construct the world's biggest OLED display manufacturing plant, with more than 30 percent higher production capacity than the company's current biggest factory, according to Korean website ETNews. "iPhone 8" mockup designed by Benjamin Geskin for iDrop News The report, citing unnamed industry sources, suggests the tentatively named A5 factory could begin mass production in 2019, with a peak yield of between 180,000 and 270,000 display panels per month. Samsung Display has reportedly also been expanding its existing A3 plant since the second half of 2015 in order to fulfill demand for OLED displays from both its sister company Samsung Electronics and Apple. Apple is widely rumored to release its first iPhone with an OLED display, known as the "iPhone 8" for now, later this year. Reports claim Apple has ordered between 70 and 92 million OLED panels from Samsung for the device. An earlier report out of Korea claimed Apple aims to switch its entire iPhone lineup to OLED displays by

Ming-Chi Kuo Agrees iPhone 8 Will Launch in September With 'Severe' Shortages Due to Delayed Production

As more alleged design schematics and dummy models of the "iPhone 8" leak online, one of the biggest questions remains the smartphone's actual launch date. Although some industry sources believe the tenth-anniversary iPhone will still launch in September -- perhaps in very short supply -- Japanese site Mac Otakara earlier this year suggested the OLED iPhone 8 would launch "very much" behind the the LCD models. Today, KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo has published a report supporting the theory that Apple will debut the OLED iPhone in September, but the device will face "severe supply shortages" for some time. Kuo believes that production ramp-up on the OLED iPhone model won't begin until as late as October-November, two months later than previous ramp-ups in August-September. Similar delayed production rumors have been circulated by Bloomberg, analysts from Barclays, and Brian White. Kuo believes that this delay "won't undermine actual demand," as long as the iPhone 8 lives up to the hype, but the heaviest demand might be pushed back until as far as the first quarter of 2018, when the bulk of users could get their hands on the device according to Kuo. Production ramp up of OLED iPhone could be delayed to October-November (previously estimated to be August-September, as in previous years). That said, if new features, such as 3D sensing, can provide good user experience, a temporary supply shortfall won’t undermine actual demand, which may be deferred to 1H18. In that case, potential contribution starting late-2Q17 from OLED iPhone could be partially delayed by

Apple Signs Two-Year Deal With Samsung For 92 Million OLED iPhone Panels

Apple has reportedly signed a two-year contract with Samsung for the supply up to 92 million curved OLED panels, as it attempts to ramp up capacity for this year's release of its high-end "iPhone 8". Earlier this week supply chain sources claimed Apple had ordered 70 million units of panels from Samsung, its sole OLED supplier for the upcoming phone, which is expected to feature a major design overhaul. However, according to reports on Thursday in Korea-based ET News, Chosun Biz, and other media outlets, Apple has upped its OLED demands in an effort to cater for higher demand later this year and beyond 2017. "iPhone X" concept via Gabor Balogh Based on the contract, Samsung Display will ship 70-92 million small-size OLED panels to Apple in 2017, said the reports. This means that about 30% of iPhone devices shipped in 2017 will come with curved OLED panels, given that Apple currently ships about 200 million iPhone devices a year.Rumors have consistently suggested Apple will offer the OLED iPhone alongside more typical iPhone 7S and 7S Plus models with standard LCD panels when it announces the devices in September. Apart from a 5.2-inch edge-to-edge display, the redesigned "10th anniversary" iPhone is thought to feature a glass body, some form of wireless charging, no Home button, and a premium price tag. Meanwhile, Taiwan-based Yuanta Securities Investment Consulting has estimated that shipments of Apple's forthcoming iPhones are likely to reach 100 million units in 2017. At least 55 million of the units are expected to feature OLED panels. Samsung has

5.8-Inch iPhone Affirmed to Have Mostly Flat Display With Slightly Curved Edges

Apple's widely rumored 5.8-inch iPhone with an edge-to-edge OLED display will be flat across the front of the smartphone, and slightly curved along the left and right edges to conform with the layer of 2.5D glass that covers the display, according to multiple people familiar with the matter. "iPhone X" concept with 2.5D display by designer Gabor Balogh Yesterday, a report claimed the high-end iPhone will have a curved display, but with gentler curves than Samsung's Galaxy S7 edge. MacRumors has confirmed the report refers to a display that is slightly curved at the edges below 2.5D cover glass, meaning the display itself cannot be dramatically curved. This means the report essentially mirrors comments from IHS Markit, which last week told us that Apple will likely "adopt a flat implementation of OLED design on their special iPhone model, which is analogous to the current 2.5D glass design," but "mostly flat" is perhaps a better descriptor. Yesterday's report said the slightly curved edges will make the iPhone sleeker, but it claimed the new design will not offer significant new functions. But a slightly expanded Multi-Touch area could result in improved gesture recognition along the edges, such as pulling up Control Center in landscape mode. KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo and Chinese research firm TrendForce have also said they expect Apple's special edition iPhone to have 2.5D cover glass, which refers to the slightly curved glass that sits above the actual display. Apple has used 2.5D cover glass since the iPhone 6 lineup in 2014. Kuo said Apple is

Apple Aims to Make Every iPhone With an OLED Display by 2019

A new supply chain report claims that Apple is planning to use OLED for every iPhone model by 2019, with the company expected to adopt OLED panels for 60 million units of the iPhone 8 later in 2017, equating to around 40 percent of its total manufacturing run (via The Bell) [Google Translate]. Apple will double the adoption of OLED panels for the 2018 iPhone before completely migrating over to OLED-only models for 2019. The same report claimed that both Samsung and Inteflex are currently gearing up production for flexible printed circuit boards (FPCB) for this year's iPhone 8, with Samsung specifically beginning an expansion of its Electro-Mechanics plant in Vietnam to account for the increased Apple supply quota this year. Apple plans to introduce OLED panels to all iPhone models by 2019. This year's introduction accounted for only 40%, but next year it is expected to double to 80% and 100% next year. For the 2017 iPhone line, Apple is expected to stick with LCD panels for two of the iPhones -- currently referred to as the "iPhone 7s" and "iPhone 7s Plus" -- while making the "iPhone 8" its first-ever mobile device to include an OLED screen. Today's supply chain report said that Apple will use three suppliers to produce OLED panels, and orders for each will be decided and placed when production is started around April or May. The iPhone 8 is currently rumored to include an edge-to-edge OLED display with an integrated Touch ID fingerprint sensor embedded within the screen. The OLED display is widely agreed to measure 5.8 inches, while the primary area of user

Nikkei Now Agrees 'iPhone 8' Will Have Larger 5.8-Inch OLED Display

Apple will launch three new iPhone models in the fall, including one with a 5.8-inch OLED display and two with LCD displays, according to Nikkei Asian Review. While this is a rumor we have heard several times already, the Japanese website previously said Apple would launch a 5-inch iPhone—not 5.8 inches—in 2017. The relevant bit from today's report:The upcoming iPhone, to be launched this fall, will come in three configurations -- two with liquid crystal displays and one with a 5.8-inch organic light-emitting diode display.Here's what it reported last October:"Apple has tentatively decided that all the 5.5-inch, 5-inch and 4.7-inch models will have glass backs, departing from metal casings adopted by current iPhones, and Biel and Lens are likely to be providing all the glass backs for the new iPhones next year," the source said.5.8 inches is now the widely agreed upon screen size for Apple's first iPhone with an OLED display, but there is likely a reasonable explanation as to why Nikkei and two other reports suggested the model would have a 5-inch display. Namely, KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo said while the so-called "iPhone 8" will indeed have a 5.8-inch display, the primary area will actually be 5.15 inches, while the rest of the space will be reserved for a wide row of virtual buttons. Kuo also said the device's physical dimensions will likely be similar to a 4.7-inch iPhone. Given the size variation between the OLED panel, display area, and physical dimensions rumored, it remains unclear if Apple will officially categorize the "iPhone 8" as 5.1

Apple Considering Adding China's BOE as OLED Supplier for 2018 iPhone

Apple is in discussions with China's BOE Technology Group to supply OLED screens for the 2018 iPhone, reports Bloomberg. The Cupertino company is looking for ways to shore up its OLED supplies as the iPhone transitions from LCD to OLED displays. Apple has been testing BOE's OLED displays for months, according to Bloomberg, but it isn't yet sure whether to add the company as a supplier. BOE is one of China's largest display makers, recently spending about $14.5 billion on two AMOLED factories. Talks are too early to allow BOE to contribute displays for Apple's 2017 OLED-based iPhone, known as the iPhone 8, but BOE is hoping to contribute to the 2018 iPhone supply. If Apple and BOE agree to a deal, the Chinese manufacturer will become Apple's first OLED supplier outside of South Korea and Japan. In November, it was reported that Apple's OLED suppliers, which include Samsung, LG, Sharp and Japan Display, would not be able to meet demand for the 2017 iPhone. The worldwide shortage of OLED displays is thought to be one of the reasons why Apple is limiting the feature to the high-end device, while the regular iPhone 7s and 7s Plus are said to feature LCD displays. One of BOE's new factories will open this summer while another will open a couple years later. When they're up to full capacity, BOE says they'll be able to produce 1.6 million square-meters of flexible glass substrates (surfaces that displays are carved out of) a month. Samsung will exclusively produce OLED displays for iPhones in 2017, with Apple opening up to LG, Sharp and Japan Display in

OLED iPhone 8 to Feature Curved Display and New Touch-Sensitive Technology

Apple's high-end OLED iPhone 8 will use a curved display rather than a flat panel and could potentially feature new touch-sensitive technology, according to a report published on Sunday. Multiple sources have claimed Apple is planning a 5.5-inch "premium" version of its 2017 iPhone with an OLED screen alongside new models with traditional LCD displays, but today's report underlines Apple's intention to use a curved screen similar to that found in Samsung's Galaxy S7, which has been described as having the best smartphone display on the market. "The OLED version of the new iPhone will all be curved as Apple ordered all plastic OLED -- not glass -- from Samsung Display. Samsung is capable of supplying a little less than 100 million units of curved OLED displays to Apple," a source familiar with the matter told The Korea Herald.Previous rumors outlining Apple's intention to launch multiple iPhone models have been dogged by suggestions that it could delay adoption of OLED technology entirely due to supply constraints. Samsung is Apple's sole supplier of OLED displays in 2017, with LG and Sharp among the companies tapped to ramp up production for 2018, but the latest report indicates that limited supply may indeed shape differentiation in next year's 10th anniversary iPhone line-up. According to the Herald, Samsung's curved OLED capacity for Apple is estimated at around 70 million to 100 million units. That's in line with previous estimates, but it's less than half of Apple's annual sales of the iPhone series, which stand at around 200 million units a year. The

Apple Testing More Than 10 Prototype iPhone Models, Including One With Curved OLED Display

Multiple sources have claimed Apple will launch its first iPhone with a curved OLED display next year, and now The Wall Street Journal has thrown its weight behind those rumors. The report claims an OLED version could be introduced as one of several new iPhone models unveiled next year, but it would have a higher price tag than current iPhone models. OLED displays are thinner, lighter, and allow for flexible designs, but they are up to $50 more expensive to produce than traditional LCD displays, according to analysts cited. OLED displays can also be more energy efficient, as unlike LCD displays, they do not require a backlight to illuminate the screen. When displaying black pixels, OLED displays are completely off, which could preserve battery life. Apple is said to have more than 10 different iPhone prototypes under development, so it may decide not to launch a version with an OLED display next year, according to the report. Previous reports said Apple will also launch new 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch models with traditional LCD displays next year. Apple will likely tap Samsung as its primary OLED display supplier, but it wants LG Display, Japan Display, and Sharp to ramp up production for 2018, the report added, corroborating information heard previously. Sharp President and CEO Tai Jeng-wu confirmed Apple's plans to switch to OLED technology last