Control Center

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'Control Center' How Tos

How to Use and Customize Control Center in iOS 11

One of iOS 11's key new features is a redesigned Control Center that is highly customizable thanks to 3D Touch integration. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. When you deep press on the system toggles pane, for example, a larger pane pops open with previously hidden AirDrop and Personal Hotspot controls. On iOS 11, users can add, remove, and organize controls in Control Center through the Settings app. Simply follow these steps. How to Add Controls to Control Center on iOS 11Tap on the Settings app. Tap on Control Center. Tap on Customize Controls. Scroll down to More Controls. Tap on the "+" sign to the left of a control to add it to Control Center.How to Remove Controls From Control Center on iOS 11Tap on the Settings app. Tap on Control Center. Tap on Customize Controls. Scroll down to Include section. Tap on the "-" sign to the left of a control to remove it from Control Center.How to Organize Controls in Control Center on iOS 11Tap on the Settings app. Tap on Control Center. Tap on Customize Controls. Tap on the three lines to the right of a control and drag its position up or down.The default controls in the top portion of Control Center, such as the brightness and volume sliders, cannot be removed or reorganized. List of Default ControlsAirDrop Airplane Mode Bluetooth Cellular Data Personal Hotspot Wi-Fi Music Orientation Lock Do Not Disturb Brightness Night Shift Volume AirPlay MirroringList of Customizable ControlsAccessibility Shortcuts Alarm Apple TV Remote Calculator Camera Do Not

'Control Center' Articles

Apple Community Envisions Better Ways to Activate Control Center on iPhone X

One of the biggest software changes on Apple's new iPhone X is the location of Control Center, the useful user interface that provides you with quick access to music playback controls, Bluetooth and Wi-Fi toggles, the flashlight, calculator, and much more thanks to iOS 11's customizable layout. On pre-iPhone X devices, the Control Center is awoken by swiping up from the bottom edge of the device. Because that action is now the default "go home" gesture on iPhone X, Apple has moved Control Center to the top right edge of the smartphone. This location change has removed the simplicity and ease-of-access to Control Center for many iPhone X users -- particularly those who are left handed -- who have been posting about the iPhone X-specific issue in the MacRumors forums, Twitter, and on Reddit. Some of these users have also provided interesting alternative locations and invoking gestures that Apple could potentially implement in future iOS updates, but it should be reiterated that these are simply community ideas and not in any way an indication that we'll see them added to the iPhone X. How to activate Control Center on iPhone X Reddit has been the source of multiple ideas for new Control Center gestures on the iPhone X, with a few that replace existing gestures (so you'd have to choose between two options in Settings) and some that are new. One user theorized that the iPhone X's new Reachability gesture (swiping down on the Home indicator, which must be activated in Settings) could have an alternate option for invoking Control Center. Further threads provided

EFF Says iOS 11's Wi-Fi and Bluetooth Toggles in Control Center Are Misleading and Compromise Security

Apple recently confirmed that Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are not fully disabled when toggled off in Control Center on iOS 11, and the change has generated some fresh criticism from a prominent non-profit digital rights group. For background, when Wi-Fi and Bluetooth are toggled off, an iPhone or iPad on iOS 11 merely disconnects from a Wi-Fi network and Bluetooth accessories. The actual Wi-Fi and Bluetooth radios in the device remain activated. Moreover, Wi-Fi and Bluetooth automatically reenable at 5:00 a.m. local time each day, or if the device is restarted. iOS 11 works this way so that Wi-Fi and Bluetooth continue to be available for AirDrop, AirPlay, Apple Pencil, Apple Watch, Location Services, and Continuity features like Handoff and Instant Hotspot. As a result of the change, the Electronic Frontier Foundation believes that iOS 11 compromises users' security. In a critical article, the EFF said the toggles are "misleading" and "bad for user security."When a phone is designed to behave in a way other than what the UI suggests, it results in both security and privacy problems. A user has no visual or textual clues to understand the device's behavior, which can result in a loss of trust in operating system designers to faithfully communicate what’s going on. Since users rely on the operating system as the bedrock for most security and privacy decisions, no matter what app or connected device they may be using, this trust is fundamental.The EFF said the "loophole in connectivity" can potentially leave users open to new attacks, and it linked to a white paper

Bluetooth and Wi-Fi Aren't Fully Disabled When Toggled Off in Control Center on iOS 11

Apple has confirmed that Bluetooth and Wi-Fi are not fully disabled when toggled off in Control Center on iOS 11. Even when toggled off in Control Center on an iPhone, iPad, or iPod touch running iOS 11 and later, a new support document says Bluetooth and Wi-Fi will continue to be available for AirDrop, AirPlay, Apple Pencil, Apple Watch, Location Services, and Continuity features like Handoff and Instant Hotspot. Toggling off Bluetooth or Wi-Fi in Control Center only disconnects accessories now, rather than disabling connectivity entirely. If Bluetooth is turned off, the iOS device can't be connected to any Bluetooth accessories until one of these conditions is met: You turn on Bluetooth in Control Center. You connect to a Bluetooth accessory in Settings > Bluetooth. It's 5 a.m. local time. You restart your device. While Wi-Fi is disabled, auto-join for any nearby Wi-Fi networks will also be disabled until one of these conditions is met: You turn on Wi-Fi in Control Center. You connect to a Wi-Fi network in Settings > Wi-Fi. You walk or drive to a new location. It's 5 a.m. local time. You restart your device. Apple made this change in the iOS 11 beta, and it gained more attention after the software was publicly released yesterday. iOS 11 users can still completely disable Wi-Fi and Bluetooth for all networks and devices by toggling them off in the Settings app. Apple says users should try to keep Wi-Fi and Bluetooth turned on for the best experience on an iOS device. (Thanks, FlunkedFlank!)

iOS 11 Preview: Control Center Gets Customizable With 3D Touch

Apple on Monday introduced iOS 11, the next major version of its mobile operating system for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch. The software update, available this fall, includes a completely redesigned Control Center that fits on one page and is much more customizable thanks to 3D Touch. Control Center's default appearance (left) and with additional controls (right) When you deep press on the Music pane, for example, a larger pane with volume, playback, and other controls pops open. Likewise, when you deep press on the pane with Airplane Mode, Wi-Fi, Bluetooth, and Cellular Data toggles, a larger pane pops open with AirDrop and Personal Hotspot toggles. More granular controls appear by deep pressing with 3D Touch On iOS 11, users can add and organize additional controls and toggles to appear in Control Center through the Settings app. However, the following controls are default and cannot be hidden: the system toggles pane, music, orientation lock, brightness, volume, Do Not Disturb, and AirPlay Mirroring. In Settings, users can add and organize additional controls to appear in Control Center The following controls can be added and organized in Settings: • Accessibility Shortcuts • Alarm • Apple TV Remote • Calculator • Camera • Do Not Disturb While Driving • Flashlight • Guided Access • Home• Low Power Mode • Magnifier • Notes • Screen Recording • Stopwatch • Text Size • Timer • Voice Memos • Wallet Control Center still lacks a truly customizable drag-and-drop layout, but the return to a single-page design and some customizability are welcomed

Night Shift Beta Tidbits: Disabled in Low Power Mode, Control Center Changes

Apple has made some changes to Night Shift in iOS 9.3 betas 4 and 5. The most notable change is the disabling of the feature when in Low Power Mode. The toggle switch in both the Night Shift settings and Control Center are now grayed out in Low Power Mode. The new change has generated some complaints since it seems that users will want to use both features in the evening hours. Night Shift is now disabled in Low Power Mode on iOS 9.3 betas Meanwhile, tapping the Night Shift icon in Control Center no longer brings up a contextual menu with "Turn On For Now" and "Turn On Until Tomorrow" options. Instead, the toggle now manually activates Night Shift until the next trigger in your automatic schedule, such as sunset, sunrise, or a specific time. Night Shift no longer has a contextual menu in Control Center (right) Similarly, there is a new "Manually Enable Until Tomorrow" toggle in the Night Shift settings that keeps the feature turned on until the following morning's sunrise, or another specified time. This means the toggles in Settings and Control Center, which can also disable Night Shift, are essentially the same in this beta. Also in the settings, the color temperature slider has also been moved to the bottom of the menu. The "Cooler" and "Warmer" labels have been changed to "Less Warm" and "More Warm," while the small blue and orange circle markers have been removed. New fine print says "warmer temperatures can reduce eye strain." Night Shift is a major new feature in iOS 9.3 that, when enabled, automatically changes the color temperature of an iOS

OS X 10.11 Could Feature Control Center, 'Rootless' Security and More, iOS 9 to Support A5-Based Devices

While OS X Yosemite introduced several new high-profile features, such as Handoff, iCloud Drive and Instant Hotspot, the focus of OS X 10.11 will be on improved stability and performance, new security features and system-wide interface tweaks, according to a lengthy report by 9to5Mac. OS X 10.11 is still expected to gain a handful of noteworthy features, including a systemwide change to Apple Watch font San Francisco and a new Control Center menu similar to iPhone and iPad. Control Center was originally found in early betas of OS X Yosemite, but was not included in the final release."Control Center moves many of the controls from the Mac’s Menu Bar to a pane that slides out from the left side of the Mac’s display, adding on-screen music controls and other iOS-influenced features," the report claims. "However, Control Center reportedly has been in flux during development, and could be pushed back again." A possible first look at Control Center for Mac on OS X from 2014 Apple is also reportedly working on a major new kernel-level security system called "Rootless" for OS X and iOS that will help curb malware and protect sensitive data by prohibiting users from accessing certain protected files on Mac and iOS devices. "Rootless" appears to be a permanent feature of iOS, much to the chagrin of the jailbreaking community, but can likely be disabled on OS X. Apple plans to enhance security one step further by converting many of its core IMAP-based applications on OS X and iOS, such as Notes, Reminders, and Calendar, to have an iCloud Drive backend. Apple expects there to