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Quick Takes: Apple's Ecosystem Explained, Crumb-Resistant MacBook Keyboards, and More

In addition to our standalone articles covering the latest Apple news and rumors at MacRumors, this Quick Takes column provides a bite-sized recap of other headlines about Apple and its competitors on weekdays.

Friday, March 9


Apple's ecosystem explained: YouTube tech reviewer Marques Brownlee explains why Apple's ecosystem of products and services is so strong. He also advises against becoming too locked into just one ecosystem.


Commentary: A good example of the strength of Apple's ecosystem is iMessage and its coveted blue message bubbles, which have essentially become a status symbol. As silly as it may sound, there are a countless number of tweets that mock green bubbles, which is the color Apple uses to display standard text messages.

AAPL sets all-time high closing price of $179.98: The previous record was $179.26, set on January 18, 2018. Apple's overall all-time high remains $180.62, set during intraday trading on February 28, 2018. AAPL has been on the rise since bottoming out at $150.24 on February 9 amid a wider stock market selloff.

Commentary: Apple shares have technically traded for higher prices, but today's record high factors in multiple stock splits, including a 7-for-1 split in 2014. Apple's market cap now hovers around the $915 billion mark.


Timing of Apple's rumored March event: Apple typically invites the media to its special events roughly 10 to 12 days beforehand, so if there is a March event on its agenda, then we'll likely hear about it soon.
Commentary: The big question is whether Apple will hold a media event or make its announcements via press releases as it did last year. Rumored products that could debut this month include a new iPhone SE, lower-priced 9.7-inch iPad and MacBook Air models, and the AirPower charging mat, along with iOS 11.3.

Other Reading:
For more Apple news and rumors coverage, visit our Front Page, Mac Blog, and iOS Blog. Also visit our forums to join in the discussion.



Top Rated Comments

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15 weeks ago
Here's a wild idea Apple - Why don't you admit to your mistake and realize that the butterfly keyboards were an indulgence in Ive's ego (much like the Trash Can Mac was) and go back to the scissor keyswitches?
Rating: 25 Votes
15 weeks ago
I won't watch the YouTube video, but in general I think the benefits of using an integrated set of tools outweigh the fear of "lock in". You either take the pain all at once when you change from one ecosystem to another, or continuously over time in trying to make tools work together when they weren't meant to. I'll choose the former.
Rating: 17 Votes
15 weeks ago
Interesting. Don’t get locked into one ecosystem. Does that include google?
Rating: 17 Votes
15 weeks ago
Marques Brownlee is a decent enough guy, and his general theory here seems alright, though it’s nothing we haven’t heard before. But I think some of the motivations that he attributes to a few things in this video are a little off.

First of all, he suggests that one of the goals Apple has every time they invent a new product is to gather more of your data, which is a bit specious. Apple sells products, not advertising, so a user’s data does not have the same sinister value for Apple that it does to Google and Amazon.

Secondly, the idea that Apple’s primary motivation is lock-in, rather than giving the user the best possible experience is a projection or speculation, not a fact. Apple didn’t invent the W1 chip to lock people into the ecosystem, they did it to make the wireless experience better and smoother because the existing Bluetooth and chip technologies in the marketplace couldn’t do what they wanted. This is true a lot of the time—Apple gets into businesses or areas where the current technology isn’t good enough. Texting sucked so they fixed it and made it better. But the reason they didn’t make Messages or FaceTime available for other formats first and foremost is that they don’t control the hardware and software of Android and other phone makers, (and there’s a lot of cheap hardware out there) so they cannot assure a high level customer experience the way they traditionally like to.

It all goes back to the early days when a lot of third party companies didn’t make hardware/software that was Mac compatible, so Jobs and Apple often had to roll up their sleeves and make some of their own hardware and software out of necessity, lest Mac buyers might be so underserved that they leave the platform.

Thirdly, and this cannot be emphasized enough, every other manufacturer out there would love to keep you in their ecosystem—they just aren’t as good at it!
Rating: 16 Votes
15 weeks ago

Crumb-resistant keyboard. I like the idea. :)
[doublepost=1520638561][/doublepost]Describing integrated features across different products as being "hooks," shows how ignorant or biased Marques Brownlee is.

He’s actually a terrible tech reviewer. I have no clue how he got so popular. He’s generic and super biased.
Rating: 13 Votes
15 weeks ago
For all my needling of Apple, they deserve all the financial success they get. Apple sells useful products to people who want to buy them and bring more beauty/art/functionality to people's lives. Contrast this with a lot of companies that make money deceiving and outright shagging people (e.g. big banks and Google (YouTube censorship)). They remain the best at providing an integrated ecosystem...in spite of Siri.
Rating: 13 Votes
15 weeks ago
The iPad Pro keyboard (Smart Keyboard) is crumb resistant because it’s covered in fabric.

Apple desperately needs some solution for the new MBPs since the keyboard failure rate is astounding.
Rating: 10 Votes
15 weeks ago
We used to have those. They called them "removable keyboards". You just slid a couple of sliders, popped the keyboard up, hit it with a little compressed air, and you were back in business. Just saying.
Rating: 10 Votes
15 weeks ago
Crumb-resistant keyboard. I like the idea. :)
[doublepost=1520638561][/doublepost]Describing integrated features across different products as being "hooks," shows how ignorant or biased Marques Brownlee is.
Rating: 10 Votes
15 weeks ago
Steve was quoted for the strategy of trapping young customers with iTunes, iPod, and "the cool factor."
I was firmly in the Apple ecosystem, but I am branching out now and seeing how limited Apple products really are. For instance, the Mac Mini/Pro haven't been updated in years and I don't want an iMac. Linux Mint is a breath of fresh air.
Rating: 8 Votes

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