LG Display


'LG Display' Articles

LG Display Could Supply OLED Displays for This Year's 'iPhone X Plus'

LG Display saw its shares surge to a one-month high on Wednesday following a report that the company will begin supplying OLED panels to Apple's new range of iPhones this year (via Financial Times). LG's stock rallied on an Electronic Times report that the South Korean firm would make over 15 million OLED panels for Apple's 2018 range of iPhones. LG is already a supplier of LCD panels, currently used in the iPhone 8 and iPhone 8 Plus, but Samsung dominates supply of OLED displays for Apple's flagship iPhone X. Indeed, last week LG Display revealed in a regulatory filing that it didn't supply any of the OLED panels currently used in the iPhone X. iPhone X Plus mockup by Benjamin Geskin via iDrop News However, that could change this year, since Apple is expected to launch two new 5.8-inch and 6.5-inch iPhone models with OLED displays in 2018. According to today's report, LG Display will supply Apple with the 6.5-inch OLED panels, while Samsung will supply the 5.8-inch or 6-inch OLED panels. Reports have been trickling out since July 2017 that Apple has invested billions of dollars in LG's OLED production capability for smartphones, but the fruits of its investment were thought to be some ways off. LG was initially reported to have secured 45,000 panels per month for future iPhones from 2019, while as recently as September it was suggested that Apple would have to wait until at least next year before it could move beyond Samsung for significant supplies of OLED panels. However, Wednesday's report suggests LG could secure its position as the number two supplier of

Apple Reportedly Investing Billions in LG to Make OLED Displays for Future iPhones

Apple is widely expected to introduce its first iPhone with an OLED display later this year, after a decade of using solely LCD technology. Earlier reports peg Samsung as the exclusive supplier of OLED displays for the high-end smartphone, as the only company that can reliably produce both the quantity and quality of panels that Apple demands. That could change within a few years, however, as Apple has decided to invest 3 trillion won/$2.67 billion in LG's OLED production for smartphones, according to The Investor, citing a Korea Economic Daily newspaper report. Apple will reportedly make the investment as advance payment for the planned OLED display supplies from the Korean display maker. The iPhone maker is said to secure 45,000 panels per month for future iPhones from 2019. Apple always aims to diversify its supply chain in order to secure lower prices and reduce the risk of relying on one supplier, so it's easy to see why the iPhone maker appears to be willing to help LG ramp up OLED display production. Reports about Apple's potential investment first surfaced earlier this month, after the companies allegedly tentatively agreed upon the investment plans, and it now appears that a deal has been or is nearly finalized. LG is likely to build a production line dedicated to iPhone orders only, as part of its agreement with Apple, according to The Investor. It is frequently rumored that Apple will introduce a trio of new iPhone models later this year, including iterative iPhone 7s and iPhone 7s Plus models with LCDs and the so-called "iPhone 8" or

LG Display Plans $13 Billion OLED Investment Over Next Three Years

Earlier in July, a report by The Korea Herald suggested that Apple and supplier LG Display were working on a deal that would see Apple investing $1.75-2.62 billion into LG Display's OLED manufacturing, specifically a plant that would be exclusively devoted to Apple orders. Today, Reuters has provided a few more details on LG Display's plans to enter the OLED display market for smartphones, which rival Samsung Display currently dominates. In total, LG Display plans to invest $13.5 billion into boosting its output of OLED screens over the next three years, covering TV screens and specifically hoping to "make inroads against rival Samsung in smartphone displays." LG Display is already the OLED leader in large-screen television displays, but now the supplier is said to be seeking a strong foothold in the OLED screen market for smartphones, coming in the wake of OLED-backed iPhone 8 rumors and Apple's reported plans to go OLED-only on iPhones beginning in 2019, and perhaps even 2018. LG Display will invest around $4.5 billion for a new production line that will create flexible OLED panels to help bolster its position in the auto display and smartphone market, and another $2.5 billion will be saved for another line of "large-size OLED screens." In regards to lines dedicated to small and mid-sized OLED displays, it's said that Apple will help out with getting the lines up and running, continuing the investment rumors began earlier this month. Around 5 trillion won is earmarked for a new line for flexible OLED aimed at bolstering its position in auto displays and

Apple Reportedly Investing in LG Display's New OLED Plant, Will Be Solely Devoted to iPhones

While Samsung remains the world's the dominant supplier of OLED panels and will supply Apple with up to 92 million OLED screens over the next two years, a new report today suggests that Apple is looking to diversify its supply chain by investing $1.75-2.62 billion into LG Display's OLED manufacturing. Specifically, Apple and LG Display are said to be considering a deal that would funnel Apple's investment into LG Display's new "E6" OLED plant, which would be "exclusively dedicated to Apple orders" (via The Korea Herald). LG Display's production on OLED screens is still far off, with its output for Apple predicted to start sometime in early 2019, which still places Samsung as the reigning supplier of OLED components for Apple over the next few years. No deal between Apple and LG Display is confirmed yet, with the companies having "tentatively" agreed upon the investment plans and more finalized details expected to come later in the month. Apple is reportedly in talks with LG Display to invest about 2 to 3 trillion won (US$1.75-2.62 billion) into the Korean display maker’s new OLED production lines exclusively dedicated to Apple orders. “Samsung Display is the only display maker that meets Apple’s strict quality criteria for now,” said an industry source on condition of anonymity. “LG Display is said to be meeting about 70 percent level of the requirements, while Chinese display makers are still struggling to catch up with that of LG.” For the 2017 line of iPhones, rumors have been pointing towards the "iPhone 8" as having an OLED screen, while the iPhone 7s and

LG Said to Supply Apple With Foldable Displays for Future iPhones

LG's display division is developing and will start mass-producing foldable displays for smartphones in 2018, and supply them to Apple, Google, and Microsoft, according to South Korean website ETNews. LG has shown off various futuristic-looking curved and foldable display prototypes over the past three years, including one with a book-like design and another that can be rolled up like a newspaper. Both designs take advantage of the flexible property of OLED displays, compared to rigid LCD displays in current iPhones. LG foldable display prototype shown at CES 2013 Multiple rumors point towards Apple releasing a new iPhone with an OLED display and glass casing at the high end of its smartphone lineup next year, but the reports suggest the display will be curved rather than foldable. With more than ten iPhone prototypes in testing, however, the exact design remains to be seen. The all-new premium model is expected to have at least a 5-inch display, with early rumors claiming it could be up to a 5.8-inch device. Samsung is expected to be the primary—and possibly sole—supplier of OLED displays for Apple, at least until LG joins the mix in 2018 or later if today's report proves to be accurate. LG curved display prototype Next year's iPhones could have bezel-free designs and no physical Home buttons, as some reports claim Touch ID will be integrated directly into the display as now possible. Apple has filed patents for flexible OLED displays with both curved and foldable designs, confirming it has at least explored both sides of the coin. Apple's foldable display

Apple is 'Close' to OLED Screen Deal With LG and Samsung for Future iPhones

Apple is close to signing a final agreement with LG Display and Samsung to provide OLED screens for next-generation iPhones, according to a new report from ET News [Google Translate] (via Reuters). The OLED panels are rumored to be included with iPhones starting in 2018. The two Korean companies plan to spend around $12.8 billion (15 trillion won) combined to build up OLED production capacity over the next two to three years. ET News also adds that Apple is likely to provide some funding to both LG and Samsung to help with their investments. Additionally, LG plans on converting existing LCD production lines into OLED production lines to reduce costs. Samsung, on the other hand, will produce 30 percent fewer orders than LG. Last month, Nikkei reported that Apple plans to switch iPhones over to OLED displays starting in 2018, with both LG and Samsung sharing a large portion of OLED panel production. LG was already planning capacity upgrades for high-volume OLED screen production that would be required for iPhone demand. Earlier this month, it was reported that Japan Display was also planning mass production of OLED displays for iPhones starting in 2018. OLED displays can provide sharper images and brighter colors compared to LCD displays. However, OLED displays tend to have shorter lifespans and come with higher manufacturing costs. Apple has been reportedly "consulting with display makers" on how to minimize potential

iPhones Expected to Have OLED Displays Starting in 2018

Apple plans to switch to OLED displays for iPhones starting in 2018, according to Japanese website Nikkei. The report claims Apple has notified its suppliers about its future plans, with LG Display already planning capacity upgrades for high-volume OLED display production. LG Display and Samsung Electronics will likely share a large portion of the OLED panel production for future iPhones, according to the report. Apple's shift to OLED displays could have "major implications" for Apple's current LCD display suppliers Sharp and Japan Display, the latter of which relies on Apple for 30% of its business.Samsung Electronics is currently the only company that can reliably mass-produce OLED smartphone screens. LG Display has a track record for producing OLEDs for television screens. Given this, the two companies will likely supply a large portion of Apple's displays. […] Apple's shift to OLED displays will have major implications for two Japanese suppliers -- Sharp, which is scrambling to rebuild its faltering operations, and Japan Display, which relies on the computing giant for 30% of its business.Due to the high volume of iPhones that Apple ships, and the technical challenges of producing OLED displays, the report claims the company will likely continue to sell iPhones with LCD screens alongside models with new OLED displays. Samsung's popular Galaxy-branded smartphones are equipped with AMOLED displays, as is the Apple Watch, but iPhones have always had LCD displays since the original model launched over eight years ago. OLED displays can provide sharper images

Teardown of iPad Air Reveals A7 Chip, LG Display, Qualcomm LTE Modem

iFixit has performed another one of its traditional high-quality teardowns on the iPad Air. The new iPad is dramatically thinner and lighter compared to the previous models, and also sports a 64-bit A7 chip, an M7 motion compressor, and a Qualcomm MDM9615 LTE modem. Among the details revealed in the teardown: - The display appears to be manufactured by LG. The Korean company along with Sharp and Samsung are expected to be the primary manufacturers of displays for the iPad Air. But while supplies of the iPad Air are plentiful, LG and Sharp are said to be struggling with low yields of displays for the Retina iPad mini also due for launch this month, with Apple turning to Samsung for help. - The A7 chip found in the device has a part number of APL5698, which differs than the APL0698 chip found in the iPhone 5s. The processor in the iPad Air is likely the 1.4GHz variant which was discovered in benchmark results earlier this week, and is 100MHz faster when compared to the 1.3GHz variant found in the iPhone 5s. The Apple M7 "motion coprocessor" also makes an appearance in the logic board, with a part number of NXP LPC18A1. - 1GB of Elpida DDR3 SDRAM is found within the device but is now housed on one chip, compared to the two Elpida chips that housed the RAM on the fourth-generation iPad. - The iPad Air now sports a 32.9 Whr two-cell battery, which is smaller than the 43Whr three-cell battery found in the fourth-generation iPad. However, it appears that the same ten-hour battery life from the last generation has been preserved on the new device. - As

Teardown of Fourth-Generation iPad Reveals LG Display, A6X Chip, Lightning Connector

Close on the heels of its iPad mini teardown, iFixit has performed a similar procedure on the fourth-generation iPad. The new iPad is extremely similar to the previous model, with the main exceptions being the move to a more powerful A6X chip and a change to Apple's new Lightning connector. Of most significant interest is of course the A6X chip, which would be an enhanced version of the A6 chip that debuted in the iPhone 5, with improved graphics to help drive the iPad's large Retina display. A date code on the A6X reveals that it was manufactured in the 37th week of 2012, which corresponds to mid-September, but a more detailed analysis of the A6X will need to wait for chip teardown experts such as those at Chipworks to get their hands on the part. Other interesting discoveries include: - The display is manufactured by LG, as opposed to the Samsung display found in the third-generation iPad torn down by iFixit. Apple does, however, source many of its components from multiple vendors, so it is unclear whether Apple has excluded Samsung from display production on the fourth-generation iPad. - The logic board remains the same size as in the previous model, but Apple has tweaked the layout of some of the chips. - The new Lightning port is housed in a frame that is equal in size to that of the 30-pin dock connector in the previous generation, meaning that Apple has not saved any interior space with the move to the Lightning connector. Apple will, however, almost certainly take advantage of the reduction in space needed for the Lightning connector in a more

Claim of Samsung as Sole Display Supplier for New iPad Disputed, LG Reportedly On Board

Reuters specifically refutes a Bloomberg report from yesterday which claimed Samsung is the sole supplier for the new iPad's Retina display after LG and Sharp failed to meet Apple's quality requirement. According to a Reuters source, LG is indeed providing displays for the device.Flat screen maker LG Display Co Ltd is supplying touch-screen panels for Apple Inc's new iPad, a source close to the matter said on Wednesday. [...] "LG is also in a panel supply deal with Samsung for the new iPad," the source said. Bloomberg's claim had generated significant interest given the tenuous relationship between Apple and Samsung. Apple relies on Samsung for billions of dollars' worth of components for its products even as it fights a legal battle over Samsung's Android-based hardware. Update: Dow Jones Newswires offers more detail on the situation, describing Sharp's issues with display production and noting that LG did initially experience delays before meeting Apple's requirements.When Apple Inc.'s (AAPL) new iPad tablet computers go on sale Friday, they won't be equipped with Sharp Corp.'s (6753.TO) liquid crystal display panels because there has been a delay in the Japanese electronics maker's delivery due to some difficulties in customizing its panels based on Apple's strict requirements, according to a person familiar with the situation. Sharp, which makes screens for consumer electronics and its Aquos-based LCD TVs, hasn't yet started delivering the panels but it will likely do so as early as this month in an attempt to make the next batch of iPad shipments from

LG and Samsung Still Struggling with 'Retina' iPad 3 Display?

CNET reports that LG Display and Samsung are continuing to struggle with production of the display planned for the iPad 3 next year, with both companies trying to tackle the challenge of producing the display in volume. Sources have claimed that Apple is planning a 2048 x 1536 display for the device, double that of the current iPad in each dimension.But whether manufacturers can make them in volumes that Apple demands is the question. "They have production plans for 2,048x1,536 displays. Starting in November. But those are only plans at this point," said the source, referring to LG and Samsung. "It's not a question of making just one. That, of course, can be done. The challenge is making lots of them," the source said. "This is a quantum leap in pixel density. This hasn't been done before."Some reports had suggested that Apple was hoping to release the iPad 3 late this year, but by August reports were suggesting that the launch had been pushed back to 2012, if it had ever been targeted for 2011 in the first place. Display production was identified as the major stumbling block at the time, but The Wall Street Journal had noted that trial production of the display was planned for October. Curiously, CNET's report claims that Apple is also considering a 1600 x 1200 display as a fallback option for the iPad 3 if the higher-resolution display proves to not be ready in time. Such a move would seem to run counter to Apple's strategy for increasing display resolution, as it would not be a clean multiple of the current 1024 x 768 display and would thus cause issues for

LG Resolves Quality Issues with iPad 2 Display Production

Last month, word surfaced that Apple had shifted orders for iPad 2 displays away from LG Display after the company experienced quality issues with its production. The issues were said to be related to an unacceptably high number of panels failing drop testing. Digitimes now reports that those issues have been resolved, and iPad 2 display panel shipments have returned to normal at LG Display, which is reported to have produced 4 million panels in August.LG Display (LGD) has seen its LCD panel shipments for Apple's iPad 2 return to previous levels after solving quality issues, industry sources said. Its shipments of 9.7-inch iPad 2 panels went back up to four million units in August, and will stay at a similar level in September 2011, the sources added. LGD's shipments of iPad 2 panels declined siginificantly to 2.5-2.6 million unuits in July from the previous monthly volume of about four million units due to problems with the backlight units (BLUs), prompting Apple to source more from Samsung Electronics and Chimei Innnolux (CMI), the source said.The report notes that Apple is expected to see shipments of 12-15 million iPad 2 units this quarter, but just last week the site claimed that Foxconn would be producing up to 20 million units this

Apple Shifts iPad 2 Display Orders from LG to Samsung Due to Quality Issues

DigiTimes reports that Apple has been forced to shift some of its orders for iPad 2 display panels from LG Display to Samsung and Chimei Innolux after quality issues at LG resulted in unacceptable yields with the panels failing to pass drop tests. Apple has reportedly suspended new display orders with LG, which had been the largest panel supplier for the iPad 2, until the issues can be addressed.LGD's 9.7-inch panels for the iPad 2 reportedly failed to pass drop tests, during which their backlight units (BLUs) failed, the sources said, adding the panels' yield rates were unable to meet Apple's requirements. While LGD is working on solutions, the maker's monthly shipment goal of four million units has become unlikely. July shipments of the 9.7-inch panels reached only 2.5-2.6 million units, the sources said.Much of the slack appears to have been taken up by Samsung, which reportedly produced nearly two million iPad 2 display panels during the month of July, significantly higher than its usual monthly output of slightly over one million panels. Problems at LG and competitive issues with Samsung could serve to benefit Chimei Innolux, which is attempting to increase its share of display production for the iPad 2. The company's close relationship with iPad manufacturing firm Foxconn could also drive more production to Chimei Innolux going forward. Apple initially struggled to meet strong demand for the iPad 2, with production constraints resulting in lower than expected sales during the device's launch quarter. But shipments grew last quarter to over 9 million