Adobe Lightroom


'Adobe Lightroom' Articles

Adobe Lightroom Returns to the Mac App Store

At WWDC 2018, Apple introduced a redesigned Mac App Store alongside changes to sandboxing parameters on macOS Mojave. Since then, several well-known apps have launched on or returned to the ‌Mac App Store‌, including the Microsoft Office suite, Microsoft To-Do, BBEdit, Transmit, and others. Next up is Adobe Lightroom CC, which is available on the Mac App Store as of today. The professional photo editing software is free to download, but requires a $9.99 monthly subscription via Apple's in-app purchase system after a one-week trial. 1TB of cloud storage is included with a subscription. As noted by The Verge, Lightroom was previously available on the ‌Mac App Store‌ for a one-time purchase of $149.99 in 2012:This isn't the first time that you've been able to get Lightroom in the ‌Mac App Store‌. Back in 2012, when Adobe sold its apps as standalone purchases before starting to push Creative Cloud subscriptions, Lightroom 4 was available for $149.99. Lightroom 5 never came to Apple's store, however, and even Adobe itself doesn't sell standalone versions of Lightroom today.This news is a win-win for Apple and Adobe. Apple has landed another major app on the ‌Mac App Store‌, which faced years of criticism, and will generate revenue from its split of in-app purchases. Adobe, meanwhile, has made Lightroom available to a very broad audience of potential customers. Lightroom CC remains available outside of the Mac App Store as well, with subscription pricing starting at the same $9.99 per month. One benefit of switching to the ‌Mac App Store‌ version is a more streamlined

Adobe Lightroom CC v1.1 for Desktop Brings Enhanced Auto Mode, Split Tone Effect, and More

Adobe on Tuesday released Lightroom CC v1.1 for macOS, bringing some additional features and enhancements to the photo editing suite, including support for new cameras and lenses. Top of the new feature list is an enhanced Auto mode for automatically applying optimized edits to images. Located in the Light panel in the Detail view, the mode now uses Adobe's advanced Sensei machine learning to intelligently apply what it considers to be the best edits. By design, Auto adjusts a number of slider controls, including Exposure, Contrast, Highlights, Shadows, Whites, Blacks, Saturation, and Vibrance. According to Adobe, the neural nets underlying Auto mode have been trained with thousands of professionally shot and manually edited photos to evaluate and correct an image. In an additional tweak, the Auto feature now also includes the ability to optimize the adjustments of the photo even after cropping has been applied.   Elsewhere, it's now possible to use Tone Curve in the Light panel to fine-tune the tonal range and contrast in photos, while the Split Toning controls in the Effects panel have been enhanced to let users create a split tone effect in which a different color is applied to Shadows and Highlights. In addition, users can now adjust the date and time of an individual photo or a group of photos. The feature aims to be useful in scenarios where users need to change the capture time of photos after clicking them. Meanwhile, fullscreen mode can now be activated from within the Detail view by pressing the F key, and the lists of supported cameras and lens

Adobe Lightroom Mobile App Gets New Raw HDR Capture Mode

Adobe has announced that the latest update to its Lightroom mobile app now allows users to capture HDR images in RAW format. The upgrade means the app now automatically determines the ideal exposure range of the subject before capturing three photos as RAW DNG files, before applying align, merge, and tone mapping algorithms to generate the final 32-bit RAW image. We're excited to announce that Lightroom Mobile now has a new raw HDR capture mode that lets you achieve a dynamic range on your mobile device that was previously only possible shooting with an DSLR or mirrorless camera. [...] You get a 16-bit floating point DNG, with all of the benefits of both an HDR and a raw photo, which is processed by the same algorithms with the same quality as the HDR technology built into Adobe Camera Raw and Lightroom.In addition to the RAW mode, the update adds an Export Original option, enabling users to to export the original files, including DNGs captured in the camera as well as raw files imported through Lightroom Mobile and Lightroom web. Adobe has also added Gestures to the Rate & Review mode, to speed up the review process. Lastly, there's a new 3D Touch and Notification Center widget, to make it easier and faster to launch Lightroom's camera. Lightroom for iOS devices is a free download, but its sync and cloud features require a subscription to Adobe's Creative Cloud Photography plan, priced at $9.99 per month. A 30-day free trial is available. Adobe has separate Lightroom apps for the iPad [Direct Link] and the iPhone [Direct Link

Adobe Updates Lightroom for iPhone With One-Handed Editing Interface

Adobe today announced a new update out now for its Lightroom iOS and Android apps, bringing an all-new photo editing experience to mobile that improves the app's ease of use thanks to a new one-handed interface. To create an improved editing experience Adobe talked to professional and casual photographers, who helped hone Lightroom's new toolset. First, the company has organized similar tools into relevant categories so it's faster and easier to find tools that are normally used together. The company's biggest priority was to introduce a system that was functional to operate with just one hand. As such, users can now see the entire image while editing it and have access to "often used tools," such as viewing before and after iterations of a photo, without needing a second hand. Lightroom mobile 2.6 represents a significant evolution of editing on mobile devices. We wanted to improve the ability to quickly find and access tools and ensure the fastest way to enhance and edit images on a phone. Our design team reached out to photographers of all skill levels to help us figure out how people edit with Lightroom mobile, what’s missing, and how we could make it even better. This update represents our first release taking advantage of this research. Lightroom for iPhone is also gaining a new info section so users can add in titles, captions, and copyright onto an image. A "professional mode" within the app's capture interface will let users set more granular controls over an image's exposure and focus so it's easier "to capture the shot you want." Lightroom for iPad is

Adobe Adds iPhone 7 Camera Support to Lightroom for iOS

Adobe has updated its Lightroom app for iOS to take advantage of the enhanced cameras on the iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus. The latest version of Lightroom for iPhone, v2.5.2, brings specific lens and sensor profiles for both of Apple's new devices, featuring specific dual-lens optimizations for the 5.5-inch handset. The update also brings improved color, noise, and lens profiles for Adobe's digital negative (DNG) image format when used in conjunction with the iPhone 7 series, allowing photographers to edit images while avoiding the bugbear of visible distortions typically brought about by lossy data compression. In addition to support for Adobe's RAW file format, the new iteration of Lightroom supports the DCI-P3 wide color gamut display featured in iPhone 7 and 7 Plus, and first seen in the 9.7-inch iPad Pro. The improved standard offers 25 percent more color than sRGB. The latest update builds on Adobe's last, version 2.5, which brought RAW shooting capability to owners of Apple devices equipped with a 12-megapixel camera, including the iPhone 6s and 6s Plus, 9.7-inch iPad Pro, and iPhone SE. Adobe Photoshop Lightroom for iPhone is a free download for iPhone and iPad on the App Store. [Direct Link]

Adobe Lightroom Launches on Apple TV

Adobe today released a Lightroom app for Apple TV, enabling users to share their Creative Cloud photos in a slideshow on the big screen. The viewing-only app features the ability to browse through your synchronized photo collections, including photos uploaded via Lightroom CC on the desktop, Lightroom on mobile, or Lightroom on the web. When scrolling through all of the photos in your Creative Cloud account, users can stop and zoom in to highlight details within individual photos. However, photos cannot be edited within Lightroom for Apple TV. Lightroom requires a fourth-generation Apple TV as well as a Creative Cloud subscription to login. The app can be downloaded for free from the tvOS App Store on Apple TV, and is available right

Adobe Lightroom Updated With HDR and Panorama Merge, Facial Recognition and Filter Brushes

Adobe today announced a major update to Lightroom CC (and the launch of the standalone Lightroom 6), its professional photo editing software for Mac users. The new update brings significant performance improvements and several new features like HDR merge, Panorama merge, facial recognition, improved slideshows, a filter brush, and more. One of the most impressive new organizational features in the updated version of Lightroom is facial recognition, which lets Lightroom users organize their photos by subject for the first time, in addition to organizing with tags, flags, and star ratings. Once a face in a single photo is named, the software is able to find more images that feature that person for quick tagging by face. A new "People" view lets users sort photos by person. Panorama Merge, another new feature, lets photographers stitch together multiple images, including RAW and JPG files to create ultra high-quality panoramic shots. It has built in tools for automatically cropping non-matching edges and changing perspectives. With Lightroom's graphical performance improvements, even huge panorama files can be edited in real time with little lag. With HDR Merge, it's possible to combine several different photos with different exposure settings into a single HDR image. Unlike other photo editing apps, Adobe's HDR Merge works directly with both JPG and RAW images. Because it works with RAW files, a high-quality HDR image can be created from as few as two photos. Other HDR options typically require more photos at different exposure levels to create a suitable image.