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Tim Cook Visits Ireland as Apple Promotes Its Support of Over 1.7 Million Jobs in Europe

Apple CEO Tim Cook has arrived in Ireland, the latest destination on his European tour, which has included stops in Italy and the Netherlands.

Apple CEO Tim Cook and Ireland's Taoiseach Leo Varadkar

Leo Varadkar, the Taoiseach or Prime Minister of Ireland, tweeted that he had a "good meeting" with Cook in the capital of Dublin on Monday. It's unclear what was discussed, but it appears to have been a routine meeting.


Cook has since headed to Cork, where Apple's European headquarters are located. There, he will formally announce an expansion of its Hollyhill campus. Apple says a new building will provide space for an additional 1,400 employees. Since 2012, Apple says it has invested nearly €220 million to develop the facility.

Apple's campus in Cork

Apple, on its recently updated Job Creation page in Europe, says it is Cork's "largest private employer" and "proud" that many of its employees in the area have worked at the company for decades.

Apple's website notes that it "has been based in Cork for over 35 years and now directly employs 6,000 people throughout Ireland supporting all aspects of the business." The company also says its Irish team has "doubled in size over the last five years and includes over 80 different nationalities."

Apple says Cork is home to its "only wholly owned manufacturing facility in the world. It provides configure-to-order iMacs which are for customers across Europe, Middle East, and Africa." AppleCare support for those regions is also based in Cork.

Nicole, a Product Quality Engineer, at Apple's iMac facility in Cork

While in Cork, Cook also visited The English Market, according to photos shared on Twitter. Earlier, in Dublin, he met with developers from Hostelworld. The app, featured on Apple's website, allows travelers to search for and book thousands of hostels in more than 170 countries around the world.


All of this amounts to good PR for Apple in Ireland, just over a month after it abandoned its plans to build a $1 billion data center in the country due to "delays in the approval process," primarily due to concerns from some local residents. Apple and Ireland are also in a major tax dispute with the European Commission.

Apple's updated Job Creation page also reveals that it now supports 1.7 million jobs across Europe, including around 1.5 million jobs attributable to the App Store ecosystem, some 170,000 jobs supported by Apple's supply chain in Europe, and some 22,000 direct Apple employees in 19 countries across the continent.

Since the App Store was created, Apple says it has now paid €20 billion to European app developers. The company says the United Kingdom leads Europe in terms of jobs linked to App Store development, at 291,000.



Top Rated Comments

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16 months ago
They're based in Ireland because of the unparalleled innovation ecosystem and greatly qualified human resources there.

Not because of tax deals.

/s
Rating: 24 Votes
16 months ago

They're based in Ireland because of the unparalleled innovation ecosystem and greatly qualified human resources there.

Not because of tax deals.

/s


Yep. Who are Apple trying to kid here? They have some staff in Ireland, but not that many, and the massive tax dodge the Irish government gave them effectively made those employees free.

And all the decision making staff were placed in London...
Rating: 13 Votes
16 months ago

('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/06/19/tim-cook-visits-ireland/')


Apple CEO Tim Cook has arrived in Ireland, the latest destination on his European tour, which has included stops in Italy ('https://twitter.com/setteBIT/status/1006196865451380736') and the Netherlands ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/06/18/apple-ceo-tim-cook-in-amsterdam-iphone/').


Apple CEO Tim Cook and Ireland's Taoiseach Leo Varadkar

Leo Varadkar, the Taoiseach or Prime Minister of Ireland, tweeted that he had a "good meeting" with Cook ('https://twitter.com/campaignforleo/status/1008773520602599424') in the capital of Dublin on Monday. It's unclear what was discussed, but it appears to have been a routine meeting.



Cook has since headed to Cork, where Apple's European headquarters are located. There, he will formally announce an expansion of its Hollyhill campus. Apple says a new building will provide space for an additional 1,400 employees. Since 2012, Apple says it has invested nearly EUR220 million to develop the facility.


Apple's campus in Cork

Apple, on its recently updated Job Creation page ('https://www.apple.com/uk/job-creation/') in Europe, says it is Cork's "largest private employer" and "proud" that many of its employees in the area have worked at the company for decades.

Apple's website notes that it "has been based in Cork for over 35 years and now directly employs 6,000 people throughout Ireland supporting all aspects of the business." The company also says its Irish team has "doubled in size over the last five years and includes over 80 different nationalities."

Apple says Cork is home to its "only wholly owned manufacturing facility in the world. It provides configure-to-order iMacs which are for customers across Europe, Middle East, and Africa." AppleCare support for those regions is also based in Cork.


Nicole, a Product Quality Engineer, at Apple's iMac facility in Cork

While in Cork, Cook also visited The English Market, according to photos shared on Twitter. Earlier, in Dublin, he met with developers from Hostelworld ('https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/app/hostelworld-hostels-hotels/id348890820?mt=8'). The app, featured on Apple's website, allows travelers to search for and book thousands of hostels in more than 170 countries around the world.



All of this amounts to good PR for Apple in Ireland, just over a month after it abandoned its plans to build a $1 billion data center in the country ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/05/10/apple-ditches-plans-for-irish-data-center/') due to "delays in the approval process," primarily due to concerns from some local residents ('https://www.macrumors.com/2017/10/19/apples-irish-data-center-challenge/'). Apple and Ireland are also in a major tax dispute with the European Commission ('https://www.macrumors.com/2016/08/29/eu-rules-apple-received-illegal-state-aid-ireland/').

Apple's updated Job Creation page also reveals that it now supports 1.7 million jobs across Europe, including around 1.5 million jobs attributable to the App Store ecosystem, some 170,000 jobs supported by Apple's supply chain in Europe, and some 22,000 direct Apple employees in 19 countries across the continent.

Since the App Store was created, Apple says it has now paid EUR20 billion to European app developers. The company says the United Kingdom leads Europe in terms of jobs linked to App Store development, at 291,000.

Article Link: Tim Cook Visits Ireland as Apple Promotes Its Job Creation in Europe ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/06/19/tim-cook-visits-ireland/')

[doublepost=1529416667][/doublepost]And not a single Apple Store in the Republic of Ireland.
Rating: 13 Votes
16 months ago

Apple runs a business that is owned by shareholders. Do you think it’s wrong for any company to maximize tax advantages while also following every US and foreign tax law to the letter?

Why should they pay more tax than they have to? Apple is already the largest taxpayer in he world.

Welcome to business.

Hm, this might be true in absolute sense but as a percentage of total income they are one of the smallest taxpayers in the world. Heck, every broke ass freelancer is a bigger tax payer than them as a percentage of income.
Rating: 10 Votes
16 months ago

[doublepost=1529416667][/doublepost]And not a single Apple Store in the Republic of Ireland.

Yes, it's absolutely ridiculous they don't have any retail stores in EIRE. It's like they are taking the p*ss..... they launder their money through Ireland, but any customers over there that have a problem with their iphones/ipads can have the hassle of 3rd party repair shops.
Rating: 10 Votes
16 months ago

If she gonna bother wearing gloves at least tie that hair up too

That explains why there is a hair behind my I pad pro screen.
Rating: 6 Votes
16 months ago
I'm so sick of Tim Cook's management style. Is this guy "ever" at the Apple Campus in Cupertino?


www.youtube.com/watch?v=f60dheI4ARg&feature=youtu.be&t=1m29s ('//www.youtube.com/watch?v=f60dheI4ARg&feature=youtu.be&t=1m29s')
Rating: 5 Votes
16 months ago
One interesting observation:

Cook visits a cherry-picked iOS dev team that makes ZERO money selling software. Nothing against hostelworld - I'm sure they do a fine job booking hostel stays, which is their business. But their development and support of an iOS app is purely overhead for this company. If this is the best Cook can do in the land of Ire, it surely speaks to the problem Apple is facing - a slow down in platform innovation. Apple's "DEVELOPERS DEVELOPERS DEVELOPERS" moments at WWDC '18 (cloaked in the form of stupid patronizing videos) is a sign that they know something is wrong, but have no clue how to fix it.

Software development teams that exist as "overhead" generally never generate platform innovations. This is because their main focus is lowering their cost of (overhead) existence.
Rating: 5 Votes
16 months ago

Apple runs a business that is owned by shareholders. Do you think it’s wrong for any company to maximize tax advantages while also following every US and foreign tax law to the letter?

Why should they pay more tax than they have to? Apple is already the largest taxpayer in he world.

Welcome to business.

Is that the only job it has to do? Just make profits and take care of the investors? It's one of the largest company. It should use it's power to do something good for humanity, civilization. You can always make money, the right way or the wrong way. I would rather prefer Apple to to make 10B every year in the right way to making 200B using all wrong ways.
Rating: 4 Votes
16 months ago

Launder? 6000 employees in Ireland are more than they have in most European, African and MiddleEastern countries (if not all of those countries, except perhaps UK).

How is it laundering if the Ireland operation is the wholesaler for the whole region? For Apple's own retail stores and third-party suppliers like the Media Mart chain?

Furthermore, the online store for the region is based there, too -- When I order online here in Netherlands, there is no Dutch Online Store; it is a localized language version of Apple's online store. Where do my goods get dispatched from for delivery to my home in the Netherlands? .....Ireland.

If the wholesale cost of every Apple product purchased in physical stores throughout Europe, Africa and MiddleEast, PLUS the retail cost of every product purchased online in the same region, is booked in Ireland as Apple's distribution center, how is that laundering? It's called single market.

You do realise that not all the employees that work in Cork are from the area originally? The reason it's based there in the first place, was because of the tax deal the Irish government and Apple agreed on.

The EU doesn't agree this is a valid legal tax strategy, and this is why there is a few billion euros held in an escrow account until Ireland/Apple/the EU all agree (or be told) what to do. Since the EU doesn't agree that this deal was 'valid', i think i'm perfectly right on describing it as 'laundering'. It doesn't matter if other companies do this too, as they will eventually get fined for back taxes too.

Just because i own and like Apple products doesn't mean i'm going to blindly agree on everything they do.

ps. Oh yeah, and not having any retail stores in the Republic of Ireland but have their distribution warehouses/offices/online stores based there, just seems a bit 'unusual'. There's 4 in Scotland (similar population size to EIRE) and even 1 in Northern Ireland.
Rating: 4 Votes

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