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FBI Used Security Flaw Found by 'Professional Hackers' to Crack San Bernardino Shooter's iPhone

Rumors have suggested the FBI employed Israeli mobile forensics firm Cellebrite to hack into the iPhone 5c used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Farook, but new information from The Washington Post suggests it was instead done with the help of "professional hackers" at least one of which is a "gray hat" researcher that sells flaws to governments, black market groups, or companies that create surveillance tools.

According to sources who spoke to The Washington Post, the hackers told the FBI about a previously unknown software flaw, which was used to "create a piece of hardware" the FBI used to access the phone via its passcode. The hardware in question allowed the FBI to guess the passcode through multiple attempts without erasing the iPhone.

iphone5c
The new information was then used to create a piece of hardware that helped the FBI to crack the iPhone's four-digit personal identification number without triggering a security feature that would have erased all the data, the individuals said.

The researchers, who typically keep a low profile, specialize in hunting for vulnerabilities in software and then in some cases selling them to the U.S. government. They were paid a one-time flat fee for the solution.
The method the FBI allegedly used to break into the iPhone is similar in description to the tool that it had requested from Apple. Before finding an alternate way into the iPhone, the FBI had demanded Apple create a new version of iOS that would disable the passcode security features built into the operating system.

Apple was ordered to give the FBI software to disable the erase feature that would have wiped the iPhone after 10 incorrect guesses, eliminate the time added between entry attempts after the wrong passcode was entered, and create a way for the FBI to enter passcodes into the device electronically instead of manually.

The FBI did not need the services of Cellebrite "in this case," according to The Washington Post's sources, despite evidence the FBI signed a $15,000 contract with Cellebrite on March 21, the same day the Justice Department asked the court to postpone its imminent hearing with Apple. The tool acquired from the hackers did end up letting the FBI access the phone, leading the case against Apple to be dropped.

The U.S. government has not decided whether the method used to break into the iPhone will be shared with Apple, but FBI director James Comey has said the tool used to access the iPhone only works on a "narrow slice of phones" that does not include the iPhone 5s and later. Apple does not plan to sue to obtain the information.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.



Top Rated Comments

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38 months ago
FBI hacked the iPhone but they still can't decide what to do about Hillary's email server...
Rating: 63 Votes
38 months ago
Damage control story. FUD, psy-ops / counter ops misinformation.
Rating: 19 Votes
38 months ago

Exactly what Apple didn't want to happen happened.


Hardly. Apple can fix security flaws, they can't fix precedent. In court documents, Apple specifically stated that they didn't believe the FBI had exhausted all their efforts to hack the phone. This is proof Apple was right about that. Apple wanted the case to move forward (because they expected to win), but this is hardly the worst case scenario.
Rating: 14 Votes
38 months ago

Or they used PhoneView, an app for Mac that allows one to view contacts, messages, photos, call history, etc without typing in the passcode.

That's 100% untrue. I use PhoneView - it requires the phone to be unlocked just like iTunes in order to trust the computer it is attached to. You may not remember it, but when you first ran it, like iTunes, the phone prompted you, asking if you wish to trust the Mac/PC it is attached to.
Rating: 9 Votes
38 months ago

The U.S. government has not decided ('https://www.macrumors.com/2016/04/05/fbi-iphone-data-still-under-analysis/') whether the method used to break into the iPhone will be shared with Apple, but FBI director James Comey has said the tool used to access the iPhone only works ('https://www.macrumors.com/2016/04/07/fbi-director-unlocking-iphone/') on a "narrow slice of phones" that does not include the iPhone 5s and later.

No no, the FBI swore up and down that this whole deal to have Apple create a special one-off version of iOS for them was JUST FOR THIS ONE PHONE, so I'm sure they'll be handing the exploit they used over to Apple, so that Apple can fix it to protect their customers from hackers. After all, the FBI wouldn't want to contribute to evil hackers breaking into citizen's phones.
Rating: 8 Votes
38 months ago

Damage control story and FUD, psy-ops / counter ops misinformation.


And a way to make Apple look bad. "Yeah, we got into the phone that Apple said was so secure that they couldn't get into unless they wrote new software, and we did it by exploiting a security flaw."
Rating: 8 Votes
38 months ago
Exactly what Apple didn't want to happen happened.
Rating: 6 Votes
38 months ago

Exactly what Apple didn't want to happen happened.

LoL really? what makes you think this?
Nothing is 100% secure.... if it were we wouldn't have jailbreaking of iPhone/pad/ect.
Rating: 6 Votes
38 months ago

it was instead done with the help of "professional hackers" at least one of which is a "gray hat" researcher that sells flaws to governments, black market groups, or companies that create surveillance tools.


What's that old saying about lying down with dogs and getting fleas? Evidently crime can pay as long as it's the government is signing the cheque. Get your hack on folks, you never know when you might be called to serve your - or another - country.

Credibility is a little bird that flew out of the window.
Rating: 5 Votes
38 months ago
So...were they paid in bitcoin?
Rating: 5 Votes

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