photography


'photography' Articles

'infltr' Photo App Gains GIF Shooting Mode, New Editing Tools, and New Toolkit Manager

Award-winning photo editing app infltr received an update on Thursday that adds a number of notable features, including new editing tools and the ability to shoot animated GIFs. The new GIF shooting mode appears beside the regular camera shutter button within the app, and joins infltr's existing support for capturing Live Photos, depth photos, and raw photos. After selecting GIF shooting mode, users can select the speed and duration of the GIF, and also choose whether it should loop forever or ping-pong back and forth. Over on the editing front, the developers have added new tools including fade, save highlights, save shadows, highlights tint, and exposure. The new selections join infltr's more than 20 editing options, which include the ability to edit Live Photos and images with depth information. And on the same note, it's now possible to manage, order and hide them, thanks to the new toolkit ordering screen introduced in version 2.13. Also fresh in this update is a new button in Camera mode that sits next to the undo option and lets users quickly reset all applied adjustments. Additionally, the app now saves in HEIC format instead of JPEG, and uses the H.265 video codec instead of H.264 whenever possible, bringing a 50 percent reduction in file size without a concomitant reduction in quality. infltr costs $1.99 and can be downloaded for iPad and iPhone (with Apple Watch support) from the App Store. [Direct Link]

Portrait Camera App 'Focos' Gains Real Lens Optical Effects and Improved Shooting Mode

Portrait Mode photo editor Focos received an update today that should pique the interest of dual-lens camera iPhone owners. The app recently made our end-of-year best iOS app list for its impressive granular aperture and bokeh adjustment tools, but version 1.2 builds on the existing feature set by adding the ability to apply real lens optical effects to depth images. The update introduces a redesigned interface layout to accommodate the new preset lenses, which include Olympus Zuiko, Helios 44, CarlZeiss Jena, CarlZeiss Otus, Leica Noctilux, Minolta STF, Minolta RF250, A1, A2, A3, and A4. In addition to the above lenses, users can create custom presets for images with depth information by combining multiple lens settings and saving them under a recognizable name. Fotos' library of presets can also be re-organized for easy access from the editing menu. Elsewhere in this update, a tilt-shift effect has been added to the app's range of filters, offering users another level of control over the plane of focus when widening aperture, while a new ratio of 2.25:1 can be found in the cropping menu. A torchlight has also been added to Focus' built-in camera mode, which should help when taking Portrait Mode photos in low light, and the app now supports Bluetooth for taking photos remotely. Lastly, a look at the general settings screen reveals an added ability to choose between JPEG, HEIC, and TIFF export formats, as well as a simple language selector, which now includes Persian. Focos supports iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X, and is a free download

Camera+ App Update Adds Ability to Transfer Applied Edits Between Images

Camera+ received an update on Friday that brings a handful of welcome UI and workflow improvements, while fixing a number of issues reported by users of the popular long-running photo app for iPhone and iPad. Although the latest v10.10.12 update of Camera+ focuses on enhancing reliability, there are a couple of notable additions to its feature set that are worth highlighting, the ability to copy and paste edits between images on the Lightbox being one of them. To transfer complex applied edits to another photo, select the image on the Lightbox, long-tap the edit button, and then select Copy Edits. With your adjustments in the memory, simply select your target photo, long-tap Edit, and then select Paste Edits to apply them. Compatible edits will be automatically applied to images with no issues, but it's worth noting that things like Portrait mode will only make the jump if the destination photo was originally captured with depth information, which Camera+ has supported since October. Meanwhile, long-time users of Camera+ may have noticed that the badge indicating the color space of a photo on the Info summary screen was missing for HEIF and TIFF formats. That's no longer the case, with wider color space tags like DCI/P3 now displaying on the relevant images. Additionally, users who like to shoot in RAW will be happy to learn that Camera+ now correctly honors the preference for saving the DNG representation independently of the JPEG/HEIF asset when exporting to Camera Roll, although bear in mind that the in-app Lightbox always uses the combined

iPhone X Low Light Photography Test Demonstrates Improved Telephoto Lens

The 2016 iPhone 7 Plus was the first Apple smartphone to feature a dual lens camera, and this year's iPhone 8 Plus and iPhone X followed suit, improving upon last year's design with larger sensors and better signal image processing. The iPhone X also benefits from added optical image stabilization and larger aperture on the telephoto lens. In what may come as a surprise to most casual snappers, the telephoto lens in Apple's dual camera isn't always activated when the 2x zoom is selected in the native Camera app. In some low light scenes, iOS opts to crop a wide angle image instead in an effort to obtain a better image with less noise and a lower likelihood of blurring. With this in mind, Studio Neat designer Dan Provost recently conducted an experiment to see how much the telephoto lens in the iPhone X improves upon the one in the iPhone 7 Plus. To do this, he looked at how much light is required before an iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone X switches to the telephoto lens when the 2x zoom mode is selected. This would show Provost if the frequency of cropping an image is at all reduced in Apple's latest smartphone. I placed an object (in this case, an old Rolleiflex camera) on a white backdrop, and flanked it on both sides with two LED studio lights. I set up the iPhone 7 Plus and iPhone X on tripods (using the Glif, natch) and positioned them to keep the framing as similar as possible. Then, starting from a completely dark room, I slowly raised the light levels and observed when the lens switched on each camera. The results are in the video below. As the embedded video

Apple Shares Two New Tutorials for Memories Feature in Photos App

Since May, Apple has been sharing a series of iPhone 7 photography tutorial videos both on a dedicated photography how-to website and its YouTube channel, and today, there are two new tutorial videos, this time featuring the Memories function in Photos. The two new videos walk users through customizing Memories in the Photos app and then sharing Memories on social networks. Each video is 40 seconds in length and includes quick step-by-step visual instructions. Apple first started highlighting the Memories feature in both a full-length iPhone 7 ad and its first Memories tutorial video, both of which were released yesterday. Many of Apple's photography tutorials are simple and are aimed at users who are not familiar with the photo taking capabilities of their iPhones. Topics covered include how to shoot a close-up, how to shoot a vertical panorama, how to shoot a selfie with a timer, and how to shoot without a flash. Some also include general photography tips and cover topics like portraits, unique angles, street light, action, and

May Cover of Food Magazine 'Bon Appétit' Shot on an iPhone 7

Food magazine Bon Appétit has used an iPhone to shoot the cover photography for its latest travel issue. The Condé Nast-owned publication follows in the footsteps of magazines like Billboard and Condé Nast Traveler, both of which have recently run covers shot on iPhones. Bon Appètit has used iPhone-shot photos in the past – including in last year's Culture issue – but this is the first time photography shot using Apple's smartphone camera has graced the cover. The image, taken by Peden + Munk on an iPhone 7 Plus, shows a woman holding a strawberry Paleta, on location in the Tlacoula Market of Oaxaca, Mexico. Peden told TechCrunch that the iPhone's portability and the "comfortability [of] not having some humungous lens in your face" allowed them to work with a tiny crew, so it felt like a "throwback to the early days" of their career. "It didn't feel like a big magazine cover shoot where there were a bunch of assistants and light reflectors," Peden said. "It felt very comfortable and natural."The photographers also said the VSCO app allowed them to edit photos while at their favorite bar or brunch spot, rather than having to drag out their laptop. Creative director Alex Grossman said it made sense to lead with an iPhone picture for the May travel issue, given the close connection between photography and travel. The iPhone 7 "works really well picking up people and places", said Grossman, and while it's not completely comparable to "a $25,000 DSLR", when shot in the right conditions, "99.9 percent of people out there" are unlikely to notice the difference.