Steve Jobs


'Steve Jobs' Articles

Apple: Steve Jobs' Healthcare Prompted Apple Watch Development

TIME published an article yesterday that offers an interesting take on Apple's long-term plans for the Apple Watch, noting that Steve Jobs' desire to improve the healthcare system indirectly inspired its development. The article is written by technology consultant Tim Bajarin, who recently spent time at the company's headquarters and met with Apple executives involved with the Apple Watch. He asked them to explain their motivation for creating the wearable device, which was released just over a year ago. According to Bajarin, the late Apple CEO Steve Jobs tasked his R&D teams with developing technology that would create a bridge between patients and healthcare providers, after his own experiences within the healthcare system in his battle with pancreatic cancer, which began in 2004. Jobs died from the disease in 2011. During the intervening years, Jobs had become concerned with what he saw as a lack of connection between patients, their data, and healthcare providers, and sought to bring greater order to the system by developing a mobile platform and an ecosystem of devices that would make patient-doctor relationships more efficient and less frustrating. During Bajarin's time at Cupertino, he was invited into Apple's dedicated health labs, where Apple has seven full-time nurses monitoring employee volunteers using advanced medical equipment as they perform various exercises in controlled conditions. Bajarin came away from his visit with the take-home message that while Apple has marketed the Watch as a fashionable timepiece, the company is committed to Jobs'

Apple Turns 40: Reflecting on Four Decades of History

Apple, co-founded by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne on April 1, 1976, celebrates its 40th anniversary today. Last night, the company hung up a pirate flag at its One Infinite Loop campus to pay homage to the Jobs-led team that worked on the original Macintosh, which was viewed as rebellious at a time when Apple was focusing on the Lisa. (Image: Michael Jurewitz) From near-bankruptcy to becoming the world's most valuable public company, Apple has been through a series of highs and lows over the past four decades. Apple's history is vast, but the timeline below provides a basic overview of some of the company's important moments over the years. Apple Timeline 1976 - Apple's history begins in the garage of Steve Jobs' childhood home in Los Altos, California, where Steve Wozniak and Jobs tested -- but designed elsewhere -- the first Apple I computers, which they later introduced at the Homebrew Computer Club. The Byte Shop places 50 orders. The computer later sells for $666.66.

Trappist Monk Who Inspired Apple's Fonts Passes Away

The man who inspired Steve Jobs to bring multiple typographic styles to the Mac, the Trappist monk and calligrapher Rev. Robert Palladino, died late last month at the age of 83. Palladino taught calligraphy classes at Portland's Reed College, which Jobs attended during his dropout year. Yesterday The Washington Post published a retrospective highlighting the development of Palladino's art, the encounter between the two men, and the continuing influence Palladino's calligraphy had on Jobs' aesthetic vision. Robert Palladino teaching in 1978 (Image: Reed College) Palladino's creative journey began in 1950 when he joined a New Mexico monastery at the age of 17. A scribe monk in the Trappist order noticed Palladino's elegant handwriting, and tutored him in the art of decorative lettering over the course of five years. Eventually, Palladino left New Mexico and moved to Lafayette, Oregon, where his art caught the attention of Lloyd Reynolds, an expert calligraphist and the creator of the calligraphy program at Portland's Reed College. After striking up a friendship with Reynolds through written correspondence, Palladino left the silent monastic life in 1968 to study under his new mentor full-time, before Reynolds retired a year later and left Reed College's program in Palladino's hands. Steve Jobs enrolled in the college in 1972, but dropped out after his first semester. However, the future Apple co-founder continued to frequent the campus and Palladino's work soon caught his eye. Jobs recounted his appreciation for the handwritten art in his 2005 commencement

'Nerds' Musical About Steve Jobs and Bill Gates' Rivalry Cancels Broadway Run

In January it was announced that Nerds, a musical about the rivalry between Apple co-founder Steve Jobs and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates, would begin its Broadway run on March 31, 2016. Today, producer Carl Levin announced that the production would have to cancel its Broadway run, reports Variety. “On behalf of my fellow producers and investors, it is with great disappointment that we will be postponing the Broadway opening of ‘Nerds’ due to the loss of a major investor,” said producer Carl Levin (“Rock of Ages”) in a statement. Levin led a team of producers that included Elizabeth Williams, Greenleaf Productions and Clear Channel Spectacolor.The musical, which featured lyrics by Robot Chicken's Jordan Allen-Dutton and Erik Weiner and music by Hal Goldberg, was set to feature "an array of tech" that included holograms and a companion app that allowed the audience to choose the show's ending. The musical comedy would chronicle the rise of Jobs and Gates and the competition between their companies. An early version of Nerds debuted in 2005 at the New York Musical Theater Festival before going on two runs at the Philadelphia Theater Company. In 2013, it had a run at the North Carolina Theater. The latest iteration was in rehearsals with a cast that included The Book of Mormon's Rory O'Malley as Steve Jobs and Memphis' Bryan Fenkart as Bill Gates. While the show will not play Broadway in 2016, producers say a national touring version of the show is in the

Original Musical 'The Crazy Ones' Will Depict Steve Jobs' 'Powerful Demons'

A new musical centering around the founding of Apple Computers by Steve Jobs is debuting this month in New York. Developed at the New York Musical Festival, the Musical Theatre Factory, and the New York Theatre Barn, "The Crazy Ones" is billed as "a thrilling new original pop-rock musical" that aims to depict Jobs' genius as well as his "very powerful demons." In 1982, Steve Jobs was in control. His company, Apple Computer, was on top of the world: his products were changing the work and home life of hundreds of thousands of users every day, and he was exorbitantly, extravagantly rich. But something sinister was brewing underneath the surface - both at Apple, and in Steve's own mind. The Crazy Ones tells the story of the man behind the genius and how he strove to leave behind a legacy, despite some very powerful demons. The music and lyrics were written by award-winning composer Zack Zadek with a book by Alexander Pototsky, who've been working together on the idea for The Crazy Ones for over two years. Their creation will finally see its debut on March 15 at Feinstein’s/54 Below in New York City. Those interested in attending can check out ticket pricing here. This isn't the first time Steve Jobs' life has been the subject of dramatization outside of film -- last year it was announced that an opera depicting the Apple co-founder's life will debut in

Steve Jobs Refused to Bring iPod & iTunes to PC Without Walt Mossberg's Blessing

Tony Fadell, known as the godfather of the iPod for his role in its design, recently sat down Appvance CEO Kevin Surace at the SV Forum Visionary Salon Dinner to reminisce about Steve Jobs and his time at Apple. VentureBeat attended the event and has shared a transcript of the discussion. Fadell has discussed his role at Apple and his relationship with Jobs many times over the years, but new details, additional color, and lesser-known tidbits tend to surface with each new interview, making them worth a read. This most recent interview covers an interesting look at the decision to bring iTunes to the PC. Image via VentureBeat Jobs was initially against introducing PC support for the iPod because he viewed the device as a way to attract people to the Mac. Fadell had a team of people working on porting iTunes to PC to give people who didn't own a Mac a taste of Apple products. Fadell describes his effort to get iTunes on the PC as a "knock down, drag out battle." After being pressured by much of the iPod team to get iTunes to the biggest market, Jobs relented, but he insisted that journalist Walt Mossberg, who wrote for The Wall Street Journal at the time, sign off on the design.He [Steve] finally said, "Okay. But under one condition. We're going to build these and run it by Mossberg. And if Mossberg says it's good enough to ship, then we'll ship it." He wanted to divorce himself from having to make the decision. But Walt said, "Not bad. I'd ship it." That's how we actually shipped on the PC.Following iTunes' PC launch, Fadell says Mac sales accelerated. The iPod

Today Marks Steve Jobs' 61st Birthday as MacRumors Turns 16

Today marks what would have been Steve Jobs' 61st birthday, and Apple fans around the world are once again remembering the late Apple co-founder and former CEO on Twitter and in our discussion forums. Coincidentally, today also marks the 16th birthday of MacRumors, launched by Arnold Kim on February 24, 2000 -- before OS X, iPods, iPhones, iPads, and more. As always, we express our gratitude to the readers, contributors, volunteers, sponsors, and all those who allow us to continue sharing the latest Apple news and rumors. Remembering Steve on his 61st birthday. "Let's go invent tomorrow." pic.twitter.com/UGYMcohsf0— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) February 24, 2016 Jobs co-founded Apple with Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne in 1976, and the roots of the company were based in the garage of his childhood home in Los Altos, California. He worked at Apple for 25 years, over two separate stints between 1976 and 2011, in addition to founding NeXT in 1985 and funding Pixar in 1986. Jobs passed away on October 5, 2011 following a lengthy

Upcoming 'Nerds' Broadway Musical Chronicles Rivalry Between Steve Jobs and Bill Gates

An upcoming musical comedy that highlights the rivalry between Apple co-founder Steve Jobs and Microsoft co-founder Bill Gates is set to debut on Broadway on March 31, 2016. Called Nerds, the musical will chronicle the rise of Jobs and Gates and the competition between their two companies. According to Variety, the musical will feature "an array of tech" like onstage holograms, projection mapping, and an interactive in-show app that lets audience members interact with one another and help choose the show's ending each night. "We're thrilled to add a jolt of comedy to this already astounding theater season, with this hilarious tale of the Founding Fathers of Tech, from a creative team stacked with new voices," said producer Carl Levin. "While fine-tuning and re-coding the show for this exciting launch, we've also been exploring innovative ways to enhance the 'user experience' inside the theater, for a uniquely entertaining event - compatible for Broadway audiences of all generations."The cast for Nerds has not yet been announced, but the play was written by Jordan Allen-Dutton and Erik Weiner, both of whom previously wrote for cartoon series Robot Chicken. Casey Hushion directs, while music was written by Hal Goldberg. Previews for the show start on March 31, 2016, and its official opening date is April 21, 2016. Tickets are available from the Nerds website with prices that start at

Steve Jobs Passed on Building Apple Car in 2008 to Focus on iPhone

Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who passed away in October 2011 following a lengthy battle with a rare illness, contemplated building a so-called "Apple Car" as recently as 2008, according to his former advisor Tony Fadell. Tony Fadell discussed an Apple Car with Steve Jobs in 2008 (Image: Bloomberg) In an interview with Bloomberg, Fadell, who led Apple's iPod division between 2001 and 2010, said he had discussions with Jobs on multiple occasions to hypothesize about what features an Apple-branded vehicle could have."We had a couple of walks," Fadell said in an interview with Bloomberg's Emily Chang. The pair posed hypothetical questions to each other, such as: "If we were to build a car, what would we build? What would a dashboard be? And what would this be? What would seats be? How would you fuel it or power it?"Jobs, who drove a Mercedes, decided not to move forward with the idea at the time, said Fadell, instead focusing Apple's efforts on the iPhone, which accounted for about two-thirds of the company's net revenue last year according to SEC filings. Fadell, who now serves as Nest Labs CEO at Google parent company Alphabet, said he does not have firsthand knowledge about Apple's car plans, but he did reflect on the similarities between smartphones and modern vehicles."A car has batteries; it has a computer; it has a motor; and it has mechanical structure. If you look at an iPhone, it has all the same things. It even has a motor in it," said Fadell, who's now the chief executive officer of Alphabet's Nest home appliances company. "But the hard stuff is really on

Video Shared With Apple Employees Shows 'Softer Side' of Steve Jobs

A video obtained exclusively by ABC News today aims to showcase the "softer side" of Steve Jobs, with the former Apple CEO addressing an assembly of Apple employees the day before the release of the original iPhone in 2007. During the brief clips shared by ABC News, Jobs urges the company's employees to go in to an Apple Store and "just give one of the Apple retail store employees a hug," discusses his theory of corporate management, and debunks the history to his famous ripped jeans. The footage was shared with Apple's employees yesterday to mark the fourth anniversary of Jobs' death on October 5, 2011. A handful of well-known Apple executives put together some personal essays in memory of the Apple co-founder, including current Apple CEO Tim Cook, calling him "brilliant" and with "a great sense of humor." A lot of Jobs' past has been resurfacing recently alongside the release of a handful of films chronicling his life, including Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine and the upcoming Aaron Sorkin-penned Steve Jobs movie. A few of Jobs' supporters aren't backing many of these interpretations of him, including his widow Laurene Powell Jobs, who tried to cease production on the Sorkin script multiple

Tim Cook Commemorates Steve Jobs on Fourth Anniversary of His Death

Apple CEO Tim Cook has sent an internal email to employees (via The Telegraph) to commemorate the fourth anniversary since the death of late Apple co-founder and CEO Steve Jobs, who passed away October 5, 2011 following a lengthy illness. Cook described Steve as a "brilliant person," encouraging Apple employees to ask their co-workers about "what he was really like," and reminded his staff about the "privilege and responsibility" of continuing the work that he "loved so much."Team, Today marks four years since Steve passed away. On that day, the world lost a visionary. We at Apple lost a leader, a mentor, and many of us lost a dear friend. Steve was a brilliant person, and his priorities were very simple. He loved his family above all, he loved Apple, and he loved the people with whom he worked so closely and achieved so much. Each year since his passing, I have reminded everyone in the Apple community that we share the privilege and responsibility of continuing the work Steve loved so much. What is his legacy? I see it all around us: An incredible team that embodies his spirit of innovation and creativity. The greatest products on earth, beloved by customers and empowering hundreds of millions of people around the world. Soaring achievements in technology and architecture. Experiences of surprise and delight. A company that only he could have built. A company with an intense determination to change the world for the better. And, of course, the joy he brought his loved ones. He told me several times in his final years that he hoped to live long

First Trailer for 'Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine' Documentary Released

Magnolia Pictures has shared the first trailer and movie poster for Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine with Mashable, just over four months after the film premiered at SXSW 2015 in Austin, Texas. The upcoming documentary, directed by Oscar-winning filmmaker Alex Gibney, portrays Jobs as both a tech visionary and unapologetic leader throughout his career at Apple. Apple senior executive Eddy Cue expressed disappointment in the documentary following its debut, describing the film on Twitter as "an inaccurate and mean-spirited view of my friend" and "not a reflection of the Steve I knew." Cue added that the best portrayal of Jobs is in the book Becoming Steve Jobs by Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli, which he describes as "well done and first to get it right." Very disappointed in SJ:Man in the Machine. An inaccurate and mean-spirited view of my friend. It's not a reflection of the Steve I knew.— Eddy Cue (@cue) March 16, 2015 Universal previously released the full-length trailer for its aptly named Steve Jobs movie, starring Michael Fassbender, Seth Rogen, Kate Winslet and Jeff Daniels, earlier this month. The trailer mainly consists of a single shot of Fassbender as Jobs, with cast voiceovers providing snippets and teases of conversations regarding Jobs' true legacy at Apple, which he co-founded with Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne in 1974. Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine opens in select theaters on September

Universal Releases First Trailer for 'Steve Jobs' Movie

After filming began earlier in January, and a few photo leaks soon thereafter, not much had been heard surrounding Universal Picture's Steve Jobs movie. Today, however, the studio released the first official trailer for the new movie. The trailer is mostly a single shot of Michael Fassbender as Jobs, with cast voice overs providing snippets and teases of conversations regarding Jobs' true legacy at Apple. While it doesn't reveal much that wasn't already known, the one minute teaser provides a handful of closer looks as Michael Fassbender, Seth Rogen, Kate Winslet, and Jeff Daniels as Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, Joanna Hoffman, and John Sculley, respectively. The movie has faced turmoil over the years as it began development, with multiple actors up for the titular role and even a change of studios due to scheduling conflicts between Danny Boyle, the film's director, and Sony. This year, as the film's October 9 release date grew nearer, casting calls and set photos began popping up online, even going so far as to offer fans the first glimpse of Fassbender in full costume as

'Becoming Steve Jobs': Rare Insights into Steve Jobs' Evolution and Personality

After an initial teaser post from John Gruber earlier this month and several leaks and excerpts, the new Steve Jobs biography Becoming Steve Jobs debuted yesterday, and we've had a chance to read through the book that offers a new look into the life of the Apple co-founder. While Walter Isaacson's best-selling 2011 biography of Jobs was undertaken with Jobs' authorization and participation, many close to him felt it didn't offer an accurate reflection of his personality. In the wake of that book's debut, former Fortune and Wall Street Journal reporter Brent Schlender, who interviewed Jobs numerous times over the final 25 years of Jobs' life, teamed up with former Fortune colleague and current Fast Company executive editor Rick Tetzeli for an alternative take on Jobs' life. Notably, Schlender and Tetzeli were eventually able to obtain the cooperation of a number of key figures, including Tim Cook, Eddy Cue, Jony Ive, and Laurene Powell Jobs, to share their perspectives on Jobs. The new book takes a mostly linear approach to telling the story of Jobs' life, beginning with Apple's early days. Much of that early content has been shared in previously published books and articles, but the story becomes more interesting once it reaches 1986, the year Schlender and Jobs first met for an interview when Jobs was in the early stages of building NeXT after having been ousted from Apple the year before. Schlender's many interviews and discussions with Jobs over the years give him a fairly rare perspective, and Schlender uses that perspective to argue the Jobs of his later

'Becoming Steve Jobs' Excerpts: Friendship With Tim Cook, Campus 2 and Succession at Apple

The upcoming book Becoming Steve Jobs, written by Brent Schlender, a reporter who interviewed Jobs several times throughout his life and became close to him, and Rick Tetzeli, executive editor at Fast Company, is set to be released on March 24. Ahead of time, the authors have shared a number of excerpts from the book that provide untold details about his life. Apple CEO Tim Cook claims that Walter Isaacson's autobiography of Steve Jobs "did him a tremendous disservice," depicting the late Apple co-founder as "a greedy, selfish egomaniac." Cook added that Jobs certainly "wasn't a saint," but that "it's emphatically untrue that he wasn't a great human being." He believes that Jobs truly cared about things, but his passion was sometimes mistaken for arrogance."Steve cared," Cook continues. "He cared deeply about things. Yes, he was very passionate about things, and he wanted things to be perfect. And that was what was great about him. A lot of people mistook that passion for arrogance. He wasn’t a saint. I’m not saying that. None of us are. But it’s emphatically untrue that he wasn’t a great human being, and that is totally not understood."Even as his sickness progressed, Jobs continued working at Apple until his final days, and wanted others to treat him as if he were not sick. Cook claims that Jobs began thinking about a succession plan and life after Apple in 2004, and spent time working with Joel Podolny, a professor he hired from the Yale School of Management, on Apple University to pass on his methodologies to Apple’s next generation of leaders."But as the days went

'Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine' Film Debuts at SXSW, Eddy Cue Calls It 'Inaccurate' and 'Mean-Spirited'

Following the premiere of Steve Jobs: The Man in the Machine this weekend at SXSW in Austin, Texas, reviews of the film have begun circulating in the media. The Guardian notes that the documentary portrays Jobs as "a man with dazzling talent and monomaniacal focus, but utterly lacking in empathy," with director Alex Gibney showing several examples of the late Apple co-founder's less-desirable behaviour that are typically overshadowed by his successes. "Yet this man, whose belief in his own righteousness was unshakeable, also terminated Apple’s philanthropic programmes, presided over huge corporate tax evasion, paid Chinese workers making iPhones a pittance, and only stumped up maintenance for his first daughter after dragging his ex-girlfriend through the courts, claiming that she was promiscuous and he was infertile, until a DNA test proved otherwise. Finally, he agreed to pay $500 a month – he was worth $200m at the time."Apple senior executive Eddy Cue was quick to express his disappointment in the documentary, describing the film on Twitter as "an inaccurate and mean-spirited view of my friend" and "not a reflection of the Steve I knew." Cue added that the best portrayal of Jobs is in the upcoming book "24">Becoming Steve Jobs," which he describes as "well done and first to get it right." Very disappointed in SJ:Man in the Machine. An inaccurate and mean-spirited view of my friend. It's not a reflection of the Steve I knew.— Eddy Cue (@cue) March 16, 2015 The Hollywood Reporter has a nearly equal assessment of The Man in the Machine, describing the film as a "two

'Becoming Steve Jobs' Leaks: Tim Cook Offered Jobs a Liver, Jobs Wasn't Interested in TV

There's a new Steve Jobs book coming out later this month, written by Brent Schlender, a reporter who interviewed Jobs several times throughout his life, and Rick Tetzeli, editor at Fast Company. The book, Becoming Steve Jobs, isn't set to be released until March 24, but Cult of Mac discovered some of the contents could be read using Amazon's "Look Inside the Book" feature and shared a few interesting tidbits that we haven't heard before. One of the best parts is a story about Steve Jobs and Tim Cook, which took place when Steve Jobs first got sick. When Jobs was ill and needed a new liver, Tim Cook offered to donate a portion of his own liver because the two shared a blood type. Jobs turned down Cook's offer and later received a full liver transplant in 2009.After discovering that he shared a rare blood type with his sick colleague, and undergoing a battery of tests at a hospital "far from the Bay Area, since he didn't want to be recognized," Cook offered his liver to Jobs -- only for Steve to turn it down. "Somebody that's selfish doesn't reply like that," Cook says.The book also reveals that Steve Jobs and Disney CEO Bob Iger contemplated buying Yahoo! as a way for Apple to get into the search business, and it unveils some details that contrast information that Walter Isaacson shared in his Steve Jobs biography. Walter Isaacson's biography was largely responsible for igniting rumors about Apple creating a literal television, but according to Becoming Steve Jobs, Jobs was not particularly interested in television, telling Jony Ive at one point "I just don't

Upcoming Steve Jobs Book Promises 'Sensational' New Stories, Launches March 24

There's a new Steve Jobs book set to be published later this month, penned by Brent Schlender, a reporter who interviewed Jobs several times throughout his life and became close to him, and Rick Tetzeli, Executive Editor at Fast Company. Called Becoming Steve Jobs, the book aims to go beyond existing myths and stereotypes about Jobs, giving a look at a man who was only human, who "wrestled with his failings and learned to maximize his strength over time." The book explores the story of how Steve Jobs made the transformation from an arrogant young man exiled from Apple to the visionary leader that skyrocketed Apple to fame. Schlender and Tetzeli interviewed many of Steve Jobs' friends, family, and inner circle, to get access to never-before-told stories. Tim Cook, Jony Ive, Eddy Cue, Ed Catmull, John Lasseter, and Robert Iger all contributed to the book. It also draws on the experiences Schlender had with Jobs in interviews across many years.Schlender and Tetzeli make clear that Jobs's astounding success at Apple was far more complicated than simply picking the right products: he became more patient, he learned to trust his inner circle, and discovered the importance of growing the company incrementally rather than only shooting for dazzling game-changing products. .Daring Fireball's John Gruber received an advanced copy of Becoming Steve Jobs and called it "the book about Steve Jobs that the world deserves." According to Gruber, it's an accurate retelling of the life of Jobs, with a "significant amount of new reporting. Some stories, he writes, "are going to be

Tim Cook Commemorates Steve Jobs' 60th Birthday: 'Love What You Do'

Tim Cook tweeted this morning to honor what would be the 60th birthday of late Apple co-founder Steve Jobs, who passed away in October 2011 following a lengthy battle with a rare form of pancreatic cancer. Cook shared a quote from Jobs' heartfelt commencement address at Stanford University in 2005, in which he said "the only way to do great work is to love what you do." Jobs co-founded Apple alongside Steve Wozniak and Ronald Wayne in 1976, with the roots of the company based in the garage of his childhood home in Los Altos, California. After turning the Macintosh into a commercial success in the decade following, Jobs was essentially ousted from Apple in 1985 following a power struggle and went on to found NeXT Computer the same year. Apple went on to acquire NeXT in 1997, bringing Jobs back as CEO, at which point he led the company to become one of the most valuable in the world on the strength of products such as the iPod, iPhone and iPad. Apple has continued to be successful under the leadership of CEO Tim Cook, reporting the most profitable quarter in the history of any company to close out 2014. The Apple Watch, set to launch in April, will mark the first major new product since the passing of Jobs. Remembering Steve, who would have turned 60 today. "The only way to do great work is to love what you do." pic.twitter.com/0YD0gZ7jvm— Tim Cook (@tim_cook) February 24, 2015 Today also marks the 15th anniversary of MacRumors, launched in February 2000 by Arnold Kim. MacRumors was a relatively early entrant in the Apple online community, arriving before the