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'Snap' Articles

Snap Launches Snap Camera App for Mac With Twitch, Skype, and YouTube Integration

Snap today announced the launch of Snap Camera for Mac, which brings Snapchat's well-known collection of lenses and filters to Macs and PCs. The Snap Camera app, which can be downloaded from Snapchat's website, offers up a simple interface with a camera field and access to hundreds of Snapchat lenses that add fun effects to your face using the Mac's camera. The different lenses available in new Snap Camera app for Mac can be used with Twitch when streaming video content, and it is compatible with YouTube, Skype, Google Hangouts, and Zoom as well. Using the lenses does not require a Snapchat account. Snap's new Snap Camera app features lenses created by Snap, lenses from third-party companies, and lenses created using the Lens Studio tool for Snapchat. Lenses are available in a list in the app that you can scroll through, but there are also options to search for lenses by keyword, mark favorites, or assign lenses to shortcuts. Snap Camera is a free download from the Snap website.

Snapchat Rolls Back Some Interface Changes to Appease Disgruntled Users

Snapchat has adjusted its iOS app interface to placate a large number of dedicated users who complained about the recent redesign, reports The Verge. Snap unveiled its radical redesign in November with the goal of creating a personalized user experience that's easier to navigate, especially for newcomers. But the change didn't go down well with many long-time users, so much so that 1.2 million of them signed a petition asking the company to walk back the UI changes. Snap initially responded to the outcry in February by acknowledging that "the new Snapchat has felt uncomfortable for many", but went no further than to reassure users that they would eventually adapt to the changes over time. However, it appears the company has now decided to roll back at least some of the adjustments it originally made as part of last year's redesign. For example, Snaps and Chats have gone back to appearing in chronological order, while Stories from friends have reverted to their original location at the right-hand side of the interface. Similarly, Snapchat now opens in camera mode, as it did prior to the redesign, and users can again swipe left to view the latest friend posts. Elsewhere, a separate subscriptions feed lets users search separately for stories by publishers and popular content creators. The changes come in an update to the iOS app that the company says is currently rolling out to users. Snap originally made the changes to appeal to a broader demographic and expand its user base, in the hope of fending off the threat of encroaching rivals like Facebook and

Snapchat Launches 'Snappables' Augmented Reality Games That Can Be Played With Friends

Snapchat today announced the launch of Snappables, which are new Snapchat Lenses that are designed to allow Snapchat users to play augmented reality games with their friends. Interactive Snappable lenses are located right near other Snapchat Lenses in the Lens Carousel and can be accessed by tapping the icon on the left side of the capture button. To use a Snappable, tap the Snappable icon and then follow the on-screen directions. Some of the available Snappables let you create a dance party or a rock band with friends, while others are more game-like in nature and can be controlled through facial expressions, touch, and motion. You can play a game where you fight virtual aliens, for example, and then send a Snap to a friend to play along. According to a Snapchat spokesperson, Snappables are the beginning of a new type of augmented reality experience on Snapchat. Prior to now, Lenses have focused on transforming your look or the world around you, while Snappables are sharable AR experiences. In other Snapchat-related news, Snapchat parent company Snap is said to be planning to introduce new Spectacles later in the week. Little is known about the new glasses, and it's not yet clear if they will feature major design changes. Snapchat can be downloaded from the App Store for free. [Direct Link]

Snapchat Plans Radical Overhaul to Make Social Platform Easier to Understand [Updated]

Longtime Snapchat users should prepare themselves for a radical overhaul of the way the mobile app works, based on comments made by Snap CEO Evan Spiegel in his earnings letter to investors on Tuesday. With the company falling short of lowered projections for growth, Snap put much of the blame on the fact that the social platform is simply a mystery to outsiders. "One thing we have heard over the years is that Snapchat is difficult to understand or hard to use," wrote Spiegel. "Our team has been working on responding to this feedback." Few details were provided on the planned redesign, but Snapchat said it was working on an algorithm to show people a more personalized version of the stories they might want to see. "We are developing a new solution that provides each of our 178 million daily active users with their own Stories experience," wrote Spiegel, "leveraging the tremendous benefits of machine learning without compromising the editorial integrity of the Stories platform that we have worked so hard to build."Spiegel said that the changes would make it easier for users to see content from people who aren't their friends, but that private conversations between close friends would remain a bulwark of the app. The esoteric nature of the social platform has apparently moved Snap to make these drastic changes, but the danger is that it could alienate existing users. However, Spiegel said the company was willing to bear the consequences. "There is a strong likelihood that the redesign of our application will be disruptive to our business in the short term,

Snap Might Buy Zero Zero, Company Behind Hover Camera Drone Sold Exclusively at Apple Stores

Snapchat parent company Snap is in talks to purchase Zero Zero Robotics, the company that created the $500 Hover Camera Passport Drone that's currently sold exclusively at Apple retail stores and Apple.com, reports The Information. The Hover Camera Passport is an ultra lightweight drone that's designed to work as a personal camera, following closely behind a person and capturing hands-free photos and videos using face and body tracking. Given its small size (242 grams) and its foldable carbon fiber body, the Hover Camera Passport can go essentially anywhere. If Snap establishes a deal with Zero Zero Robotics, the Hover Camera Passport and future related products would join Snap's existing Spectacles, which are camera-equipped sunglasses meant to capture short videos and upload them to Snapchat. Right now, the Hover Camera Passport is exclusive to Apple Stores, and Apple has inked a deal with Zero Zero that has made demo products available in many Apple retail stores around the world. Should Snap purchase Zero Zero, the latter company's deal with Apple would presumably end. Zero Zero is said to have approached Snap in an effort to secure additional funding, but a potential purchase price isn't available. Snap has reportedly been looking into acquiring drone companies since mid-2016, and has already purchased one small drone maker in Los

Snap's Camera Spectacles Now Available Through Amazon

After debuting exclusively inside special pop-up vending machines last year before becoming available as direct web orders, Snap has now begun selling its video-recording Spectacles through Amazon for the first time. When synced with the Snapchat mobile app, users can tap a button on the Spectacles to begin recording a 10, 20, or 30-second video, which is saved in the "Memories" section of the app and can be revisited and posted to their Story. As of writing, the $129.99 Spectacles are in stock on July 23 and come in Coral, Black and Teal, and include a charging case, charging cable, cleaning cloth, and Quickstart guide. All Spectacles also come with a one-year warranty. According to Snap, Spectacles can capture up to 100 Snaps on one charge, and the charging case can hold up to four full charges at a time. Amazon is an affiliate of MacRumors and this site may benefit if you click product links in the article.

Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Across Europe

Snap made its Spectacles available across Europe today, almost seven months after the company debuted them in the U.S. For anyone unfamiliar with Snapchat's first hardware product, the Spectacles are a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses that can record 10 seconds of video at a time and sync wirelessly with the mobile Snapchat app. More than 55 million people use Snapchat daily in Europe for at least 30 minutes a day, according to Snap. It's unclear what sales number the company is targeting on the continent, given that the launch of the Spectacles in the U.S. didn't raise significant revenue, but today's rollout comes as part of a planned substantial investment in the product's marketing and distribution. The camera-equipped sunglasses cost £130/150 euros and can be purchased from the product website or through "Snapbot" vending machines, which will appear on Friday in London, Paris, Barcelona, Berlin, and Venice. The vending machines dispense the Spectacles in either Black, Coral or Teal, and allow customers to try them on virtually using a built-in augmented reality display. A case and charging cable are

Snapchat Spectacles Now Available to Purchase Online for $130

After debuting exclusively inside special pop-up vending machines last year, Snapchat has today begun selling its video-recording Spectacles online for $129.99. Like in the vending machines, the Spectacles come in Coral, Black and Teal, and include a charging case and cable. At the time of writing, shipping estimates sit at a delivery time within the next 2-4 weeks. Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel said that the response to the Spectacles has been positive ever since the vending machines began appearing in California and New York. But, as TechCrunch uncovered in Snap's IPO filing, the company mentioned that "the launch of Spectacles . . . has not generated significant revenue for us." The filing further stated: "We expect to experience production and operating costs related to Spectacles that will exceed the related revenue in the near future." “As Evan shared in his interview with the WSJ, when we launched, the idea was : ‘We’re going to take a slow approach to rolling them out,’ says Spiegel. ‘It’s about us figuring out if it fits into people’s lives and seeing how they like it.’ Response has been positive since November’s launch so we’re now happy to be able to make Spectacles more readily available — especially for those in the US who have not been able to make it to a Snapbot.” When synced with the Snapchat mobile app, users can tap a button on Spectacles to begin recording a ten-second video, which is saved in the "Memories" section of the app and can be revisited and posted to their Story. Even though distribution has been added online, Snapchat said that customers

Snapchat's Video Spectacles on Sale via 'Snapbot' Vending Machines

Snapchat's video-recording Spectacles became available to buy in the U.S. on Thursday, not online or in stores, but from pop-up vending machines. Called 'Snapbots', the giant vending machines will dispense the Spectacles in either Black, Coral or Teal, and allow customers to try them on virtually using a built-in augmented reality display. For those unfamiliar with Snapchat's first hardware product, the $129 Spectacles are a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses that can record 10 seconds of video at a time and sync wirelessly with the mobile Snapchat app, which was updated on Tuesday. According to Recode, Snapchat plans to deposit the machines "soon" throughout the U.S., with the first machine appearing in Venice Beach, California. Reminiscent of Snapchat, the machines will only remain in one location for a day before being removed. The company said it will announce new Snapbot locations 24 hours before they appear, via the "Find a Bot" map on the Spectacles website. Upon discovering a bot, customers press one of the large circular buttons to 'try on' their chosen color of sunglasses, after which they must insert a debit or credit card to purchase. About 10 seconds passes as the transaction is processed, before the Bot's mouth lights up and the spectacles are dispensed along with a receipt. Snapchat, now dubbed Snap, has been developing the Spectacles for years and considers them "a toy" best used at concerts and outdoor events. Snap CEO Evan Spiegel said the limited-distribution product was made "because it's fun" and the company wants people to

Snapchat Announces 'Spectacles,' $130 Sunglasses That Record 10 Seconds of Video at a Time

Snapchat has announced its first hardware product, a one-size-fits-all pair of sunglasses called Spectacles that can record 10 seconds of video at a time, reports The Wall Street Journal. The glasses will cost $130 and launch this fall in three colors: teal, black and coral. Video will sync wirelessly to a paired iPhone or other smartphone. Snap CEO Evan Spiegel in Spectacles, Photo by The WSJ The glasses record when you tap a button near the hinge, and each tap records 10 seconds of video footage from its 115-degree-angle lens. The lens was designed to be wider than smartphone cameras, more closely mirroring the natural view of human eyes. The video is recorded in a circular format, as Snapchat CEO Evan Spiegel argues that the square and rectangle form that photos and videos currently come in are a vestige of early photos being printed on paper. Snapchat has been developing Spectacles for years, and Spiegel has been testing the device himself for a year. He tells The WSJ that one of the advantages of Spectacles is not having to hold a smartphone in front of your face because it's "like a wall." Re-watching first-person footage is like reliving a memory, Spiegel argues. He remembers testing a prototype in early 2015 while hiking with his fiancée, supermodel Miranda Kerr. “It was our first vacation, and we went to Big Sur for a day or two. We were walking through the woods, stepping over logs, looking up at the beautiful trees. And when I got the footage back and watched it, I could see my own memory, through my own eyes—it was unbelievable. It’s one thing