Fortnite Now Available to All on iOS via Nvidia's GeForce NOW Streaming Service

Following several months of beta testing, Nvidia today announced that popular battle royale game Fortnite is now available to all GeForce NOW subscribers via Safari on iOS, complete with optimized on-screen touch controls and game menus.

geforce now fortnite
Fortnite had been unavailable to play on the iPhone and iPad since Apple removed the game from the App Store in August 2020, after developer Epic Games added a direct payment option to the game in violation of the App Store's rules. However, the game can now be streamed on iOS via GeForce NOW or Microsoft's Xbox Cloud Gaming.

MacRumors tested Fortnite on iOS via GeForce NOW while it was in beta for those interested in a hands-on look at the gameplay experience.

GeForce NOW is a cross-platform, subscription-based service that allows users to stream hundreds of games across multiple devices. On the iPhone, the service is only available on the web due to App Store rules. On the Mac, there is a GeForce NOW app available that was recently updated with native support for Apple silicon chips.

GeForce NOW offers a basic, limited membership option available for free, with upgraded membership tiers starting at $9.99 per month.

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Top Rated Comments

MayaUser Avatar
27 months ago
Before you rush to let your kids jump into this, or any other Epic loot-box driven game (Rocket League et al), remember that renowned consumer privacy company PrivacySpy rates creepy, sleazy Epic as just 2.2/10.

That makes it worse than Amazon, Google, and even Zuckerberg’s Facebook.

That makes it the third worst company in the world for user privacy. The dubious honor of number one on that list? Houseparty.

Guess who owns Houseparty?
Score: 19 Votes (Like | Disagree)
cocky jeremy Avatar
27 months ago
I love it for two reasons:

1) No one will know about or even use this
2) This kills Epic's argument about Apple being the only App Store for stuff like this.

Hahaha.
Score: 16 Votes (Like | Disagree)
UKitsme Avatar
27 months ago
so what was all the fuss about, why didn't they just do this in first place?
Score: 11 Votes (Like | Disagree)
4jasontv Avatar
27 months ago

You mean adding a feature to software? It's called software development.
Oh, you mean the thing Apple did because Epic added a feature to their software? It's called gatekeeping.
Epic didn’t disclose the, I’m going to call it a “securely vulnerable” for now, security vulnerability.

Software development is when you build a product that does what you say it did. Epic didn’t do that. Also, it wasn't a feature, it was an unapproved and undisclosed securely vulnerable.

I’m not sure gatekeeping is the right word since that’s what I paid Apple to do.

Epic can make any software they like but they have to do four things first:
1. Notify Apple of all changes.
2. Get Apple's permission to offer the update.
3. Notify the user of all changes.
4. Get the user's permission to apply the update.

Even if you have permission to apply updates without review if you don't notify the user of changes they can't consent to the update being applied.

Epic didn't do any of them. At best, Epic committed fraud with malicious intent. Both Tim Sweeney and the person who created the code need prison time. The only question is, who else at Epic is guilty because they knew and didn't speak up.

Even if Epic made a case and convinced a judge they have the right to circumvent Apple (parts 1 and 2), they still need the users to know what is being applied and get their consent to do so (parts 3 and 4) if for no other reason than it puts them at significant financial risk.
Score: 9 Votes (Like | Disagree)
cocky jeremy Avatar
27 months ago

Still not done until side loading is a thing and even installing other os on iOS.
You can give that dream up.
Score: 9 Votes (Like | Disagree)
Unregistered 4U Avatar
27 months ago

Epic didn’t disclose the, I’m going to call it a “securely vulnerable” for now, security vulnerability.

Software development is when you build a product that does what you say it did. Epic didn’t do that. Also, it wasn't a feature, it was an unapproved and undisclosed securely vulnerable.

I’m not sure gatekeeping is the right word since that’s what I paid Apple to do.

Epic can make any software they like but they have to do four things first:
1. Notify Apple of all changes.
2. Get Apple's permission to offer the update.
3. Notify the user of all changes.
4. Get the user's permission to apply the update.

Even if you have permission to apply updates without review if you don't notify the user of changes they can't consent to the update being applied.

Epic didn't do any of them. At best, Epic committed fraud with malicious intent. Both Tim Sweeney and the person who created the code need prison time. The only question is, who else at Epic is guilty because they knew and didn't speak up.

Even if Epic made a case and convinced a judge they have the right to circumvent Apple (parts 1 and 2), they still need the users to know what is being applied and get their consent to do so (parts 3 and 4) if for no other reason than it puts them at significant financial risk.
And, when one considers that THIS is the kind of thing that’s possible with the controls that are in place, there is no way in heck that anything gets BETTER by removing the controls. Some people seem to feel that just by using the word sideloading, all developers will just magically start behaving themselves. :)
Score: 5 Votes (Like | Disagree)