Parallels 17.1 Update Improves Windows 11 Support on Intel and M1 Macs, Compatibility With macOS Monterey

Parallels Desktop 17.1 for Mac has just been released, offering improved support for Windows 11 virtual machines and added stability via the default implementation of Virtual Trusted Platform Modules (vTPMs) for "all future and past Windows 11 VMs." Parallels 17.1 also fully supports macOS Monterey as a host OS and improves the user experience when running macOS Monterey in a VM on M1 Macs.

Windows 11 Parallels Feature
Windows 11 requires a hardware-based TPM chip to run, which limits the software's compatibility with older PC computers and prevents it from running via Boot Camp on Intel Macs. Meanwhile there is no Boot Camp feature on Macs with Apple silicon, and the ARM-based version of Windows 11 is not natively supported.

By introducing default support for vTPMs, Parallels offers automatic Windows 11 compatibility with Intel Macs and Apple Silicon Macs, with the proviso that owners of the latter are using Insider Preview builds of Windows 11 for ARM machines.

"Knowing that Parallels Desktop plays a critical role in enabling users to run the latest versions of Windows on their favorite Mac device today, we've developed a simple solution to help all users upgrade to Windows 11 with the enablement of vTPMs by default on all Mac devices," said Elena Koryakina, Vice President of Engineering at Parallels.

There has been continuing uncertainty surrounding the feasibility of running Windows 11 on ‌Apple Silicon‌ Macs via virtualization software, particularly in light of comments from Microsoft suggesting that virtualization is not a supported scenario for its latest operating system, as well as the subsequent release of Insider Builds that break virtualization. There are still specific requirements to be aware of when running Windows 11 on both Apple ‌M1‌ and Intel-based Mac computers, which Parallels has detailed in a blog post, but this latest update should assuage concerns of some Parallels users.

In addition to automatic vTPM support, version 17.1 allows users to install Parallels Tools in a macOS Monterey VM on Apple ‌M1‌ Mac and use the Copy and Paste integrated feature between the VM and the primary macOS. The default virtual machine disk size has also been increased from 32GB to 64GB.

This version of Parallels also improves graphics for several Windows games including, but not limited to: World of Warcraft, Age of Empires 2 Definitive Edition, Tomb Raider 3, Metal Gear Solid V: The Phantom Pain, Mount & Blade II: Bannerlord, World of Tanks, and Raft.

Lastly, there is added support for VirGL in Virtio GPU, which enables Linux 3D acceleration out of the box on all supported Mac computers, brings visual performance improvements, as well as use of Wayland protocol in Linux VMs. VirGL 3D graphics can be used by modern Linux VMs even without Parallels Tools being installed, but Parallels recommends users install Parallels Tools anyway.

Parallels Desktop 17 has moved entirely to a subscription model, which means the standard edition costs $79.99 per year, while Pro and Business Editions are available for $99.99 per year. Users who purchased a perpetual license for an earlier version of Parallels Desktop can upgrade to Parallels Desktop 17 for $49.99. A free trial is available to download from the Parallels website.

Popular Stories

iOS 18 CarPlay Feature

iOS 18 Adds These 5 New Features to CarPlay

Thursday June 13, 2024 7:44 am PDT by
Apple did not mention CarPlay during its WWDC keynote this week, but iOS 18 includes a handful of new features for the in-car software. Overall, there is not a whole lot new for CarPlay on iOS 18, with changes seemingly limited to the Messages and Settings apps so far. Below, we recap everything new for CarPlay on iOS 18. New for CarPlay on iOS 18 1. Contact Photos in Messages App...
ios 18 button bulge

iOS 18 Adds Pop-Out Bezel Animation When Pressing iPhone Buttons

Tuesday June 11, 2024 10:40 am PDT by
iOS 18 includes a small but interesting change for the buttons on the iPhone, adding more of a visual element when changing volume, activating the Action button, or locking the screen. When you press an iPhone button in iOS 18, the display bezel bulges outward slightly. This feature is available for the volume buttons, Action button and the power button, and it will also likely be used for...
maxresdefault

First Look at Messages via Satellite in iOS 18

Thursday June 13, 2024 11:29 am PDT by
Apple has been gradually expanding its suite of satellite connectivity features for iPhone, and iOS 18 brings a significant new one in the form of Messages via satellite. The feature allows users to send and receive iMessages and SMS texts, including emoji and Tapbacks, while out of range of cellular and Wi-Fi networks. CNET met up with Apple's senior director of platform product marketing,...
iOS 18 Wallet Feature

Here's What's New in Apple Wallet on iOS 18 for Event Tickets and More

Friday June 14, 2024 7:32 am PDT by
iOS 18 includes a handful of enhancements to the Wallet app on the iPhone, with new features for Apple Pay, Apple Cash, event tickets, and more. Below, we outline everything new for the Wallet app on iOS 18, based on information from Apple's press release and a WWDC 2024 coding session. Redesigned Event Tickets Event tickets have an all-new design in the Wallet app on iOS 18, complete...

Top Rated Comments

ThunderSkunk Avatar
35 months ago

I thought people were moaning they will not be able to install windows on M1 Mac and therefore the M1 macs are useless.
People were, and still are, because of this: “Windows 11 compatibility with Intel Macs and Apple Silicon Macs, with the proviso that owners of the latter are using Insider Preview builds of Windows 11 for ARM machines.” The problem remains.
Score: 14 Votes (Like | Disagree)
polyphenol Avatar
35 months ago

I thought people were moaning they will not be able to install windows on M1 Mac and therefore the M1 macs are useless.
Did you miss this bit:

Insider Preview builds of Windows 11 for ARM machines.

Which is not a viable approach for anyone who will have to rely on running Windows on Apple Silicon. Could stop working at the drop of a hat with no possible basis for complaint. Microsoft tell people never to use such builds for live work.

Nor does it help those who need to run Intel-only 64-bit Windows apps.
Score: 11 Votes (Like | Disagree)
Durafab Avatar
35 months ago

If you need Windows then buy a Windows machine, it's about having the right tool for the job.

I love my MachBook and use it for all my personal stuff. However it's useless to me for work where I need to run Windows. I do run Windows 11 in Parallels on my Mac, but if it stopped working tomorrow it would be annoying, but wouldn't stop me paying the bills.
Such sage advice, and forcefully rendered. Right tool for the right job...pithy! But wrong. I use Windows for one (1) program that I use all day. Everything else is on the Mac. No way I'm going to buy some crappy windows machine to run a single program.
Score: 9 Votes (Like | Disagree)
Marx55 Avatar
35 months ago
Subscription is a deal breaker!
Score: 8 Votes (Like | Disagree)
segers909 Avatar
35 months ago

Parallels Desktop 17 has moved entirely to a subscription model, which means the standard edition costs $79.99 per year, while Pro and Business Editions are available for $99.99 per year. Users who purchased a perpetual license for an earlier version of Parallels Desktop can upgrade to Parallels Desktop 17 for $49.99. A free trial is available to download from the Parallels website ('https://www.parallels.com/products/desktop/').
But, you can still purchase a perpetual license. Here's a screenshot:



Attachment Image
Score: 7 Votes (Like | Disagree)
drewhess Avatar
35 months ago
I tried Parallels about 8 years ago, but quickly switched back to VMware Fusion. At the time, the installer installed a "Parallels Access" app without asking, which signed you up for a service on their remote servers and logged you in automatically. (I believe it was supposed to provide some sort of "Back to Your Mac" service, which I definitely did not want.) They also made Parallels Access difficult to kill and/or remove.

I haven't tried Parallels since, but now it looks like the clear way forward, with VMware seemingly losing interest in VMware Fusion.

For those of you who use modern versions of Parallels, do they still do similar slimy things, or have they cleaned up their act?
Score: 6 Votes (Like | Disagree)