Apple Retail Stores Now Selling One Drop Blood Glucose Monitor

A selection of Apple retail locations are now selling the One Drop Blood Glucose Monitor, reports CNBC. The One Drop Blood Glucose Monitor is designed to give people with diabetes a way to track blood sugar through the Health app.

Apple has long offered One Drop glucose monitoring products through its online store, but has recently transitioned to offering them up in some retail locations as part of what CNBC calls an expanded focus on the health space.

The introduction of OneDrop is a prime example of how Apple is breaking into the health space by selling consumer-oriented products and integrating the data from them in its Health app, making the iPhone and Apple Watch hubs for people's personal health.
Apple CEO Tim Cook has said multiple times that he believes one of Apple's major contributions to the world will be in the health space. "Apple's most important contribution to mankind has been in health," he said earlier this year.

Available for $70, the FDA-approved One Drop includes a Bluetooth-enabled blood glucose meter, a chrome lancing device, test strips, and a carrying case.

The blood glucose monitor can read results in approximately five seconds, transmitting the information to the One Drop app and the Apple Health app.

A limited number of Apple Stores are carrying the One Drop at the current time, but availability is going to expand to most Apple retail stores across the United States in July.



Top Rated Comments

(View all)
Avatar
8 weeks ago
Eh. CGM is the new wave. Less pricking of fingers, patients are more happy that way. This probably won’t stick around long.
Rating: 9 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago
I manage a diabetes clinic and we can barely sell anyone on the Bluetooth capabilities of the One Touch VerioFlex. CGM is what people want, no one gives a crap about a pretty lancet, a finger prick is a finger prick.
Rating: 8 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago

I manage a diabetes clinic and we can barely sell anyone on the Bluetooth capabilities of the One Touch VerioFlex. CGM is what people want, no one gives a crap about a pretty lancet, a finger prick is a finger prick.



Amen. Don't understand the buzz around this product. The Apple Store attempted selling a branded Sanofi glucose monitoring product in 2012 and it quickly disappeared from the stores in about a year due to what I understand were less than impressive sales. CNBC should update its story to reflect reality. I'm all for Apple getting into the health space but the existing integration between Dexcom's continuous products and iPhone and watch products is much more impressive IMO. Here's a link to the Sanofi product debut from 2012. https://www.mobihealthnews.com/17189/apple-stores-now-sell-sanofis-iphone-glucose-meter
Rating: 4 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago
It's like Theranos but without the sociopathic CEO and fraud.
Rating: 4 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago
I am hopeful that in a future version of the Apple Watch, continuous glucose monitoring will be available. In the short term, this is a positive step.
Rating: 4 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago
When did you ever need more than one drop?
Rating: 3 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago

I manage a diabetes clinic and we can barely sell anyone on the Bluetooth capabilities of the One Touch VerioFlex. CGM is what people want, no one gives a crap about a pretty lancet, a finger prick is a finger prick.


Yeah, as a clinical pharmacist I can say the primary factor, as with most things in healthcare, is what their insurance pays for. We all know the manufacturers sell the meters dirt cheap and then make their money off the test strips.

Fancy glucometers with Bluetooth and color screens also only do so much when a sizable percentage of diabetic people don’t actually monitor their blood sugar as they should.

I agree, CGM is the future.
Rating: 3 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago

I'm a Type II diabetic. The FDA is looking the other way. There is something rotten here. There are some meters on the market that are nearly worthless and a lot of them are inconsistent.

The TrueMetrix brand sold by Walgreens is one such brand that's pretty bad. The Wal-Mart Relion brand is also on the wild side, though not nearly as wild as TrueMetrix. Being inconsistent is the worst because you really never know if you should respond to the results. Even many of the good meters have a significant overcount or undercount problem, but at least in those cases you can at least reliably spot trends. A spike is a spike and a dip is a dip.
[doublepost=1561825835][/doublepost]

I don't think CGM is quite as strong of a solution for borderline Type II's, which I am one of. I'd love to do less finger pricking, but on my better days I don't do that much finger pricking so having to wear an abdominal meter would be overkill. The way things are going, there are going to be a lot of mild Type II's who'd still be finger pricking and need lots of encouragement or assistance to stay on the program.


Hello. :) I don't think it's the solution yet for adult Type 1's too, for regret. The simple truth is just as you said above, "a spike is a spike and a dip is a dip". I have tried Libre when it first appeared. In my case, the time it takes to show the actual BG values is unacceptable. I used far more test strips checking the integrity of the sensor, not to mention the stress of having to wear and protect one more device attached to my body. IMHO it's only justifiable for children under the close supervision of their caregivers.
Rating: 2 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago

Too expensive for what it is. I can get one for free at any pharmacy here...


Be careful, those free ones aren't very accurate. You can get into trouble when it doesn't reflect your real readings
Rating: 2 Votes
Avatar
8 weeks ago

The FDA requires a level of accuracy for all the devices they approve. Which meters have you found to be inaccurate?


I'm a Type II diabetic. The FDA is looking the other way. There is something rotten here. There are some meters on the market that are nearly worthless and a lot of them are inconsistent.

The TrueMetrix brand sold by Walgreens is one such brand that's pretty bad. The Wal-Mart Relion brand is also on the wild side, though not nearly as wild as TrueMetrix. Being inconsistent is the worst because you really never know if you should respond to the results. Even many of the good meters have a significant overcount or undercount problem, but at least in those cases you can at least reliably spot trends. A spike is a spike and a dip is a dip.
[doublepost=1561825835][/doublepost]

Eh. CGM is the new wave. Less pricking of fingers, patients are more happy that way. This probably won’t stick around long.


I don't think CGM is quite as strong of a solution for borderline Type II's, which I am one of. I'd love to do less finger pricking, but on my better days I don't do that much finger pricking so having to wear an abdominal meter would be overkill. The way things are going, there are going to be a lot of mild Type II's who'd still be finger pricking and need lots of encouragement or assistance to stay on the program.
Rating: 2 Votes
[ Read All Comments ]