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2018 and Newer MacBook Pro and MacBook Air Now Eligible for Apple's Keyboard Service Program

Apple today extended its Keyboard Service Program to all MacBook, MacBook Air, and MacBook Pro models equipped with any generation of its butterfly mechanism keyboard, not long after apologizing over the issues.


This means 2018 MacBook Air, 2018 MacBook Pro, or just-announced 2019 MacBook Pro models that experience keyboard issues such as sticky or inconsistently responding keys now qualify for free repairs up to four years after the original purchase date worldwide, regardless of warranty status.

Eligible Models

  • MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, Early 2015)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12­-inch, Early 2016)
  • MacBook (Retina, 12-­inch, 2017)
  • MacBook Air (Retina, 13-inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13­-inch, 2016, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Two Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2016, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (13-­inch, 2017, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2016)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2017)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2018, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2018)
  • MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2019, Four Thunderbolt 3 Ports)
  • MacBook Pro (15-­inch, 2019)
To address the underlying issues, Apple said it has changed the material in the 2019 MacBook Pro keyboard's butterfly mechanism to "substantially reduce problems that some users have seen," according to The Loop.

The new keyboard design on the 2019 MacBook Pro is still classified as "third generation" like the 2018 MacBook Pro and 2018 MacBook Air. Owners of the 2018 MacBook Pro and 2018 MacBook Air can have their keyboards replaced with ones that have the new materials during repair, according to The Verge.

To initiate a keyboard repair, visit the Get Support page on Apple's website to book a Genius Bar or Apple Authorized Service Provider appointment.

Related Roundups: MacBook Air, MacBook Pro


Top Rated Comments

(View all)

4 weeks ago
This definitely sparks confidence in the durability of these keyboards. "Sarcasm"
Rating: 15 Votes
4 weeks ago

This definitely sparks confidence in the durability of these keyboards. "Sarcasm"

I don’t understand?

They admit there is a problem, explain that they’ve changed materials used, extended the service program and will even swap a 2018 model to use the same new material as the 2019 model if yours needs repairs.

How does that not inspire confidence that (a) they’ll look after you long after the warranty runs out, and (b) will try to prevent reoccurrence by using the newer parts.
Rating: 15 Votes
4 weeks ago
People these days are more awaiting next generation keyboard design than CPU.

How many generations does it take for Apple to get pre-butterfly quality?
Rating: 9 Votes
4 weeks ago
Why is Apple doing this?! Especially for free!?

Based on many members here, the keyboard issue is a tiny percentage and is not a design fault. So why would a manufacturer do free repairs and its not because of their bad design?!

Apple needs to rethink this. They make a product that does not have a design fault and should not replace customers keyboards for free.

/sarcasm.

Forgot to add in...Apple stock is doing great so that means their keyword is not design fault. They had record revenues so their keyboards are perfect.
Rating: 8 Votes
4 weeks ago

I’d suggest it’s a preventative measure, to know that issues will be fixed immediately if it happens.

If they didn’t include it in the program would you believe them any more if they said it was “fixed”?

Yes... because it would show that Apple is confident that they resolved the issue. But what they've said is, "should significantly reduce", indicating that they themselves aren't confident that this issue (that only affects a small handful of people) is finally and completely resolved.
Rating: 7 Votes
4 weeks ago
But I thought only a “small percentage” of customers were affected???
Rating: 6 Votes
4 weeks ago
If only typing on these was not like pounding your fingers on cement.

The butterfly keyboard sucks even without the failure issues it’s had. It’s a HORRIBLE input device, period.
Rating: 4 Votes
4 weeks ago
It's the fact the 2019 models that customers don't even have yet are included in the repair program, how can anyone have confidence in the new keyboard (4th Generation) if Apple doesn't.

They are classing it as 3rd gen still but if they have changed the material the switch is made from, it's 4th gen.
Rating: 3 Votes
4 weeks ago

If only typing on these was not like pounding your fingers on cement.

The butterfly keyboard sucks even without the failure issues it’s had. It’s a HORRIBLE input device, period.


Well, let's hope that they've addressed the lack of movement and tactile response. Apple does sometimes come around and fix major design flaws. But my guess is that they haven't. Unfortunately the current management at Apple seems to see their hardware more as an expression of art than a tool of productivity. The butterfly keyboard is, without any doubt, the worst keyboard I've ever typed on. It's breathtakingly bad.

Luckily I almost never have to use them. Our school has managed to put-off purchasing Macs with butterfly keyboards in all but 2 cases by locating NOS (New Old Stock) systems or purchasing prior-model MacBook Airs (still available in the Education channel) where we previously would have purchased a bottom-end 13" MacBook Pro.
Rating: 3 Votes
4 weeks ago

I don’t understand?

They admit there is a problem, explain that they’ve changed materials used, extended the service program and will even swap a 2018 model to use the same new material as the 2019 model if yours needs repairs.

How does that not inspire confidence that (a) they’ll look after you long after the warranty runs out, and (b) will try to prevent reoccurrence by using the newer parts.


When I bought the first MacBook to feature the updated butterfly keyboard (gold one) back in '15, they kept blaming me for damaging the keyboard and wanted me (and other customers, I assume) to pay an extra $500-something to get it fixed -- when our computers were just 2-3 months old.

Apple ended apologizing to me down the line and updated me to a MacBook Pro 2016 model, whose keyboard equally sucked, oh well, I still like Apple.

Honestly, I would not have been mad had Apple owned up to their error and refunded me on the spot or simply fixed my keyboard, since the device they sold me was a POS and they knew it. I get that it was gen 1, and I truly loved the butterfly keyboard then, but if you're shipping hardware to consumers with known errors, own up to them.
Rating: 3 Votes

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