Apple and Northwestern University Partner to Train Chicago Teachers on 'Everyone Can Code' Curriculum

Apple today announced it will establish a Center for Excellence at Lane Tech College Prep in Chicago, which will serve as a hub for teachers at Chicago Public Schools to learn and subsequently teach Apple's Everyone Can Code curriculum.


Apple is developing the hub in partnership with Northwestern University, whose professors will lead the sessions. Teachers will gain expertise in Everyone Can Code, a free program designed to help students learn how to code, and they'll also have the opportunity to be trained on App Development with Swift.

In addition to the free professional learning sessions, Apple says educators will also have access to in-school coaching and mentorship opportunities to ensure they are comfortable teaching the complete Everyone Can Code curriculum. Apple will outfit the Center for Excellence with iPads, Macs, and accessories.

Apple CEO Tim Cook:
Teachers make a world of difference in their students' lives, and we owe so much of our own success to their creativity, hard work and dedication. At Apple, we believe every student should have the opportunity to learn to code and we are thrilled to help provide new learning opportunities for Chicago-area teachers so they can bring coding into their classrooms.
David Figlio, Dean of Northwestern's School of Education and Social Policy:
We strive to bring Northwestern's research, teaching, and service missions together in our local communities to make lives better in our hometowns of Chicago, Evanston and beyond. By collaborating with visionary companies like Apple and the education experts in the Chicago Public Schools, we have the chance to do something transformative for Chicago and the world.
This effort is an extension of an existing collaboration between Apple and Chicago to bring coding opportunities to the city's nearly 500,000 students through a citywide expansion of Everyone Can Code.

Apple hosted an education-themed event at Lane Tech College Prep on Tuesday, where it introduced a new 9.7-inch iPad with Apple Pencil support, a new Schoolwork app for teachers and students, and more.

Top Rated Comments

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22 months ago
Everyone can code, just not on the iPad that we want students to use.
Rating: 12 Votes
22 months ago
After my 25 years in Higher Education this sounds exactly like the kind is thing that is great in a managers meeting but is rapidly forgotten and everyone gets on with the job with methods they know will work.
Rating: 5 Votes
22 months ago
Apple have 2 products crying out to be re-purposed for the education market - Mac Mini and iPad Mini - they are missing the boat so much on this!!

Mac Mini with bundled keyboard and mouse, Xcode pre installed, year of developer account access included for new accounts. No, no, no, iPads and Apple pencil for all! How does Apple Pencil support help students code?! Even sticking with the iPad theme, smart keyboard support would have been a better feature!
Rating: 4 Votes
22 months ago
The fact is, this was nothing to do with education. Apple thrives on brand loyalty, this was about getting Apple products into kids' hands as early as possible.
Rating: 4 Votes
22 months ago
I read this as "Everyone can code... with Swift for Apple platforms"

But at least it's a start.
Rating: 3 Votes
22 months ago

What's the point? More and more coding jobs are heading overseas. Software development is a shrinking field in the US. You want some career advice kids? Specialize in something that requires a person on site to perform the work. Doctors, lawyers, accountants, service industry...all jobs with futures.

Software development? Very little future as long as companies believe they can hire someone in India for 20% of the cost of a US developer and get the same level of service.


If they get everyone into coding, the wages will plummet to dirt and Apple can profit. ;)

If they really want students to learn, get them some Raspberry Pies (or similar) so they can code, learn Linux, learn electronics, interface with all kinds of things and APIs, etc.
Rating: 3 Votes
22 months ago
That is exactly my point, Apple is not spending $1.00 on this project, they have abandoned the whole idea about coding, hoping volunteers and kind folk to take over..Where are the video tutorials..Why lock it to 2018 hardware?

If Apple was serious, then "everyone can code" would mean everyone from 6 to 60+ years old, there would be a series of pathways, so that you can progress from basic swift into high end languages, this would not take that long, it would generate a lot of work for people, script writers, video editors, authors, developers, on screen talent, it would encourage big industry to see the long term value...

Apple has abandoned this project, like it has FCPX/Logic, the only folks busy with this project are the marketing department..But in 6 months, this will all be forgotten..No one will care about everyone can code...This is a dead project!
Rating: 3 Votes
22 months ago

No I mean keyboard. It is easier to code using a keyboard than a touchscreen as the onscreen keyboard obscures part of the screen.


Ok, I don't understand your comment then. Isn't there already keyboard support? Or did you mean include free keyboards? Typing on a keyboard on my iPad right now, why I'm asking.
Rating: 2 Votes
22 months ago

You don’t need that much screen just to learn to code. Lots of rich and/or famous coders learned on a teletype, TV set (connected to an Apple II or C64), 80x24 CRT, or card punch.


I started my programming life at 7-years-old with a TRS80. After that it was the VIC20. After that it was the Apple IIe, and so on and so on.

Yeah, you can program on a TRS80 with the bare minimum, but would you really want to? Probably not. Likewise, going from a 20"+ screen down to a 10" screen would be very difficult to handle. You can't fit much onto that 10" screen without compromising on something such as font size.

No thanks.
Rating: 2 Votes
22 months ago
I took a class in BASIC many years ago and about a third of the class seemed to actually “get it”. Some dropped out for lack of interest and frustration. I’ve checked out Swift and it’s basically just another programming language. So maybe instead of “Everyone can code” it should be “Everyone should be be given the opportunity to try coding. Even if one has little aptitude or interest in coding, an informal introduction to it is valuable for just general knowledge.
Rating: 2 Votes

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