Apple Authorized Service Providers will begin to receive standalone memory modules for the iMac Pro in late January, allowing them to start completing RAM upgrades and repairs, according to an internal memo distributed by Apple.

imac pro white background
The directive, obtained by MacRumors, states that Apple Authorized Service Providers will be strictly required to use Apple-provided memory modules. Apple says RAM removal and installation requires the use of a special fixture and stiffeners, or else there is a risk of damaging the iMac Pro's logic board.

At a recent iMac Pro media briefing, Apple reportedly said that Apple Stores will also be able to upgrade an iMac Pro's RAM, and while that may be true, Apple's internal memo does not explicitly mention that detail.

The memo instead states that only Apple Authorized Service Providers will be able to upgrade an iMac Pro's RAM, while repairs that don't involve increasing the amount of memory will be available at all Mac service locations, including Apple Stores. The exact policy may vary by country.

The wording suggests that Apple might only repair an iMac Pro's RAM in its stores, and direct customers to an Apple Authorized Service Provider like Simply Mac if they want to upgrade the RAM, but it's not entirely clear. We've reached out to Apple for clarification, and we'll update if we hear back.

Apple's internal memo adds that Apple Authorized Service Providers will be able to begin iMac Pro main logic board and SSD repairs in February, when service-related inventory of those parts will be more widely available.

You can find an Apple Authorized Service Provider in your area by clicking Service & Support on Apple's Find Locations page.

While standard 27-inch iMac models have a small hatch on their back side that allows the RAM in the machine to be upgraded after purchase, the iMac Pro does not have that feature and is not user upgradeable by Apple's definition.

However, the teardown gurus at iFixit recently confirmed that the iMac Pro's RAM, CPU, and SSD can be upgraded, but the computer must be fully disassembled, and doing so can be rather tricky and technically voids your warranty with Apple. iFixit sells a RAM upgrade kit for the iMac Pro for $1,999.99.

When ordering the iMac Pro from Apple's website, the iMac Pro can be configured with 32GB, 64GB, or 128GB of 2,666MHz DDR4 ECC memory, and this should be carefully considered. 32GB is included in the base model for $4,999, while upgrading to 64GB and 128GB RAM costs $800 and $2,400 extra respectively.

Tag: RAM
Related Forum: iMac

Top Rated Comments

B4U Avatar
66 months ago
I have 32GB in my iMac and am very happy. I'm at the bottom end of the use-case for an iMac Pro..even the base model but I'd still benefit by having one if I could afford it.

With that said, the only part about the upgradeable RAM is Apple is likely going to rarely if ever, drop the price of these sticks even as they drop prices everywhere else meaning you might as well just buy them now and if not, stick with what you have for 3 years and when the warranty is up, go buy 3rd party RAM and do this yourself for WAY cheaper.
[doublepost=1515017783][/doublepost]

In many of my Macs, I've ran more RAM than is stated by Apple as the maximum. The application "MacTracker" has actually added this note to many models that there's an Apple Max and Real world max. I am not sure why Apple has stated RAM limits lower than the MoBos can actually take?

Because they want to ensure the device does not shut down under high loads.
Oh wait, wrong thread...

Back to serious, I would guess that Apple does not want to let the computers to run at full capacity?
My late 09 iMac supports all the way to 16GB according to Apple, but it is running with 32GB now.

Apple is really trying to nickel and dime us on every single thing now, aren't they?
(Scratch that, not nickel and dime anymore...more like Benjamins and stacks of Benjamins!)
Score: 1 Votes (Like | Disagree)
MacTiki Avatar
67 months ago
So what are the odds that RAM will not be user-upgradeable for the 2018 non-Pro iMac?
Upgradeable Macs are a thing of the past.

Being able to upgrade saddens the investors.

It’s a great business model not so great for the customer.

Go to an Apple store and you will be hard pressed to find a “computer” other than those that are at the Genus Bar in for repairs.

iPads and iPhones and other appliances are the end game. Items that need to be replaced every couple of years. Shorter life cycles for such items will become the norm.

Just imagine $1,000 ever year for a new phone.
Score: 1 Votes (Like | Disagree)

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