Apple Releases iTunes 12.3.2 With Improved Browsing of Classical Music in Apple Music

newitunes122logoApple today released a minor iTunes update for OS X El Capitan users, which brings the desktop version of Apple Music in line with the recently released iOS 9.2 version of Apple Music. The update adds support for works, composers, and performers when listening to Classical music in Apple Music, and it brings general stability and performance improvements.
This update allows you to see works, composers, and performers while browsing Classical music in the Apple Music catalog. It also includes stability and performance improvements.
Today's update is available for all OS X El Capitan users and follows iTunes 12.3.1, a minor update that was released in October.



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43 months ago
Ok... what useful feature has been removed or changed this time... :confused:
Rating: 10 Votes
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43 months ago
Does this fix the "unable to connect to Store purchases/port 443" bug?
Rating: 9 Votes
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43 months ago
Oh man, about ***** time. It amazingly took them over a month and a half to fix this crippling bug somehow introduced in the last point release:
https://discussions.apple.com/thread/7296892

Apple has so perfected design, manufacture, and distribution logistics of gadgets, all while letting its software divisions turn into a total joke. Sure, why get bothered responding to needs of (locked-in) users when there's all those NEW CONSUMERS with their new consumer MONEY wanting to buy gadgets gadgets gadgets?
Rating: 9 Votes
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43 months ago
iTunes really needs to be destroyed and rebuilt from the ground up.
Rating: 8 Votes
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43 months ago
That's welcome news! I do hope it now shows composers more clearly, because previously, album covers and titles usually showed interpreters only, making it hard to find out who you were listening to. I am glad they implemented something that I provided feedback for, for once!
Rating: 5 Votes
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43 months ago
When iTunes got its most recent UI (and then I tweaked a few options) I started to really like it (again).

My complaint is that iOS sync is quirky and unreliable. But the UI is excellent in my view.

It's an app that does a lot, and for many people I know that's a bad thing. But I use SO much of what it does, that I can't see myself hoping for a fresh start a la Photo.
Rating: 4 Votes
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43 months ago

Does an audio player need 200MB of memory? Does it still make sense that iTunes remains the "hub" for media and devices for which it has little to do with? iTunes should revert back to handling "tunes". iTunes has too many jobs. Everything from AppleTV to the iTunes Store should be done differently. It barely made sense for iTunes to serve as the conduit for syncing iPhones even back when the original iPhone came out.


This is one of those never-ending debates in software design, driven, imo, by "I don't need this feature, so nobody else does, either."

What I'd like to see is something more than a vague "should be done differently." Let's see a proposed architecture that encompasses all the functions encompassed by iTunes, with as little redundancy and as much functional clarity as possible.

iTunes was "just an audio player" for exactly one version, released in January 2001. Version 2.0 was released just nine months later in October 2001 with support for iPod syncing. Clearly, Apple knew from the first that iTunes was never going to be just an audio player - iPod was already in development when Apple purchased SoundJam MP from Casady and Greene in 2000.

Multiple small apps? Apple knows that approach well, since that's the iOS Way; separate stores and apps for nearly every type of media. It has its own logic and simplicity, but how many have posted, "Why do I need ______, when I don't ever use it? There are too many icons, and they're such wastes of precious Flash!" Further, under the hood, the architecture has to support seamless interaction between all those apps. Effectively, that means "apps" that are little more than UI, with all else being handled centrally by the OS. That approach works OK for OS X and iOS ("Those damn control freaks at Apple!"), but I'm not sure it's practical for all those people using iTunes for Windows (and just how many apps should be bundled with that download?)

And then there's syncing/backup (and since the cloud, and iCloud in particular, are nowhere near being universally embraced, we can't ignore syncing/backup)... I'm sure that, in a multi-small-app alternate universe, you'd be able to set preferences for which apps open when you connect an iPhone to a Mac. If you only sync a couple of media types, that'll be fine. But if you regularly manage more? A cascade of auto-opening media-specific apps???? I find the fact that (my choice of) Photos/iPhoto/Aperture/ImageCapture opens concurrently with iTunes to be annoying enough, even though I frequently do have to manage images.

Sure... there's no need to open all those apps - libraries can sync in background... until you need to actively manage the items being synced. Just how a la carte do we make this? Part of the point of a single, auto-opening, all-encompassing app is to serve all those who can't (or would rather not) "roll their own." How many apps should someone need if their single task is, "Sync my iPod?" "Oh, there are purchases made on the iPhone that have to be downloaded before they can be synced to the iPod? Whoops. I guess I have to open the iTunes Store, too."

In the end, the real problem may be nothing more then expecting "iTunes" to be about tunes, and nothing but tunes. At this point, though, I'd consider it an accident of history. Had Apple re-named the app when iPhone was introduced, expectations would have been managed long ago. Now, however... Is there a reason to re-brand iTunes for Mac/Windows? Would such a rebranding be worth the effort?
Rating: 3 Votes
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43 months ago
There are several reasons Apple decided to make iTunes a monolithic app suite in one, but the main one is Windows. You would not expect Apple to require half a dozen applications to download to make iOS devices to work on Windows. On OS X you could absorb much of these as services that work in the background when the device is actively plugged in and hooked into subfeatures of iTunes.
Rating: 3 Votes
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43 months ago

Does this fix the "unable to connect to Store purchases/port 443" bug?


Happened to me after I updated to MacOS 10.11.2. I got rid of that one by signing out of the store and then back in with previous 12.3.1 version.
Rating: 2 Votes
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43 months ago

How so? It doesn't seem bloated to me. What features are there that will never be used by an significant number of users? Anticipating your reply. Thanks.


Does an audio player need 200MB of memory? Does it still make sense that iTunes remains the "hub" for media and devices for which it has little to do with? iTunes should revert back to handling "tunes". iTunes has too many jobs. Everything from AppleTV to the iTunes Store should be done differently. It barely made sense for iTunes to serve as the conduit for syncing iPhones even back when the original iPhone came out.
Rating: 2 Votes
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