NFC


'NFC' Articles

Wells Fargo Adds Apple Pay Support to More Than 5,000 ATMs

Wells Fargo today announced that NFC functionality is now available at more than 5,000 of its ATMs across the United States. The technology enables customers to initiate an ATM transaction by holding their smartphone or wearable device with mobile payment functionality near an NFC-enabled ATM terminal and inputting their PIN. Supported digital wallets include Apple Pay, Android Pay, Samsung Pay, and the bank's own Wells Fargo Wallet for Android. Customers that have added their Wells Fargo debit card to Apple Pay, for example, can simply hold their iPhone near the ATM, enter their PIN, and complete a transaction, with no physical plastic card required. Wells Fargo said it plans to upgrade the rest of the company's more than 13,000 ATMs with NFC by 2019. NFC-enabled terminals are marked with the universal contactless card symbol. Earlier this year, Wells Fargo launched a separate one-time access code feature that lets customers authenticate at an ATM by entering an 8-digit code generated from the Wells Fargo app, along with their PIN, for card-free access. Bank of America also began rolling out Apple Pay support for withdrawing cash from hundreds of its ATMs last

iOS 11's New NFC Feature Being Tested for Contactless Entry to MLB Games

iOS 11 gives developers access to the NFC chip in Apple's most recent iPhone models for the first time, allowing for apps that are able to read NFC tags in places like museums and retail stores. The MLB today announced that the Oakland Athletics have tested a new ticketing feature that takes advantage of NFC, letting users enter the stadium by tapping an iPhone to a ticket scanner, much like Apple Pay. The test was conducted during six games starting on September 22 following the launch of iOS 11, and as TechCrunch points out, it marks the first time that a professional sporting event has supported contactless tickets in Apple Wallet. Tap to enter isn't radically different than scanning a barcode on a virtual ticket on an iPhone, but it's faster and less prone to errors. Following this test, the feature, being developed by Tickets.com, will be rolled out ahead of the 2018 season for the 23 MLB teams that use Tickets.com for ticketing purposes. NFC has been a supported feature in iOS devices since Apple Pay first launched, but Apple previously limited its use to contactless Apple Pay payments. A new Core NFC iOS 11 framework expands the functionality of the NFC chip, introducing a new "Reader Mode" supported in the iPhone 7, iPhone 7 Plus, iPhone 8, iPhone 8 Plus, and iPhone X. With Reader Mode and a compatible app, an iPhone that's near a real-world NFC tag can recognize and read the tag, opening a linked website or providing other information about whatever's being scanned. An example of an NFC tag at a botanical garden NFC tags are already used in a

iOS 11 Will Expand Your iPhone's NFC Capabilities Beyond Apple Pay in Several Ways

Apple at WWDC 2017 last month introduced Core NFC, a new iOS 11 framework that enables apps to detect Near Field Communication tags. Similar to Apple Pay, iPhone users are prompted with a "Ready to Scan" dialog box. After holding the iPhone near an item with an NFC tag, a checkmark displays on screen if a product is detected. An app with Core NFC could then provide users with information about that product contained within the tag. A customer shopping at a grocery store could hold an iPhone near a box of crackers, for example, and receive detailed information about their nutritional values, price history, recipe ideas, and so forth. Or, at a museum, a visitor could hold an iPhone near an exhibit to receive detailed information about it. Core NFC will expand the iPhone's NFC chip capabilities beyond simply Apple Pay in several other ways. A bottle of wine with an NFC tag similar to CapSeal Cybersecurity company WISeKey, for example, today announced that its CapSeal smart tag will now support iPhone thanks to Core NFC. CapSeal smart tags are primarily used for authentication, tracking, and anti-counterfeiting on products like wine bottles. Many other companies offer similar solutions.When placed on a bottle of spirit or a bottle of lubricant oil, for instance, and tapped by an NFC phone, the chip is able to securely authenticate and track the bottle like an ePassport does. It offers the same certified security level. It also allows the brand to broadcast personalized messages to the phone-holder detecting whether the bottle has been open or not.Core NFC is

Developer Access to iPhone's NFC Chip Coming in iOS 11

Developers coding for iOS 11 will be able to create apps that can read NFC tags, opening the door for the wireless exchange of information between an iPhone and various connected devices in a user's environment. The NFC chip in the iPhone is currently only used to handle contactless Apple Pay transactions and Passbook check-ins, but a new framework detailed in a developer resource published shortly after Apple's Worldwide Developers Conference keynote on Monday lays the foundation for multiple use cases by third-party apps. Called "Core NFC", the framework will allow apps to read Near Field Communication tags that are compatible with the NFC Data Exchange Format (NDEF), which is supported by iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus handsets. The developer support document overview describes the possibilities afforded by the new framework like so: "Your app can read tags to give users more information about their physical environment and the real-world objects in it. For example, your app might give users information about products they find in a store or exhibits they visit in a museum."Apple has limited third-party access to NFC hardware since it first appeared in the iPhone 6, and has closely guarded the technology, as evidenced in the company's ongoing spat with Australian banks eager to use Apple's Wallet NFC implementation in their own apps. However, the possibilities for NFC outside of banking look set to expand with Apple's next-generation mobile operating systems. Indeed, Apple also demonstrated a new use case for NFC in Watch OS 4, which will allow the Apple Watch

Potential 'iPhone SE' Packaging Confirms 16GB Base Storage and NFC for Apple Pay

A new photo has surfaced on Chinese microblogging service Weibo that appears to confirm the "iPhone SE" name and that it will feature 16GB base storage. The alleged packaging also indicates the new 4-inch iPhone will have NFC, lending credence to multiple rumors claiming the device will support Apple Pay. MacRumors rendering of possible iPhone SE design based on rumors The packaging, which could feasibly be photoshopped, also lists a Lightning to USB cable and EarPods in the box, meaning that the device will likely retain a 3.5mm headphone jack as expected. The iPhone SE should also unsurprisingly support LTE on both CDMA and GSM networks around the world. Alleged photo of iPhone SE packaging (Source: Weibo via iPhone-Ticker) Multiple sources have claimed the iPhone SE will feature 16GB and 64GB storage options. Our recent Twitter poll (for the iPhone 7) shows that only 2 percent of over 9,000 voters, or roughly 180 people, would prefer a 16GB model, while 45 percent said they would opt for 64GB. 36 percent of voters want at least 128GB storage. What would be your preferred iPhone 7 storage size? Rumors hint at a new 256GB model → https://t.co/EgITmY1uC9— MacRumors.com (@MacRumors) March 16, 2016 Apple is expected to announce the iPhone SE at its "Let Us Loop You In" media event commencing on Monday, March 21 at 10:00 a.m. Pacific. The smartphone's design will likely resemble the iPhone 5s, and other features could include A9 and M9 chips, a 12-megapixel rear camera, a slightly larger battery compared to iPhone 5s, VoLTE calling, Bluetooth 4.2, and Live Photos, but

Apple Now Selling Square's New NFC Reader for Apple Pay and Contactless Payments

Square has announced that its new NFC reader that enables small businesses to accept Apple Pay, Android Pay, and other contactless payments can now be purchased from Apple online or in U.S. stores for $49. The reader is compatible with NFC-equipped smartphones, including the iPhone 6 or newer, and contactless EMV chip debit and credit cards based on technologies like American Express ExpressPay, MasterCard PayPass, and Visa payWave. The small square-shaped reader functions like other NFC-enabled payment terminals, allowing users to wave an iPhone, paired Apple Watch, or contactless EMV chip card near the reader for a few seconds to complete a purchase. The NFC reader, which connects wirelessly with iOS and Android devices via Bluetooth, also works with EMV chip cards that are inserted for Chip-and-Signature payments. Square includes a magstripe reader in the box for accepting traditional swipe payments as well. Apple Pay is accepted at more than 1 million locations in the U.S., but its early rollout has mostly been limited to larger franchises. Square's new NFC reader, and similar products, will help expand Apple Pay to smaller businesses across the

Apple Joins NFC Forum to Work on Developing Future NFC Specifications

Apple this week joined the NFC Forum as a sponsor member, earning itself a place on the NFC Forum board of directors, reports NFC World. The Near Field Communication (NFC) Forum is the group that works to develop NFC specifications to ensure interoperability between different devices and services. The team also encourages companies to develop products using the NFC Forum specifications and they make sure products with NFC capabilities comply with those specifications."The top tier of NFC Forum membership, sponsor membership, entitles an organisation to a seat on the NFC Forum board of directors, the association's governing body," NFC Forum director Paula Hunter says. "We are delighted to welcome Apple to our board of directors as an NFC Forum sponsor member."Joining the NFC Forum board of directors on Apple's behalf is Aon Mujtaba, who serves as Director of Wireless Systems Engineering at Apple. According to his LinkedIn profile, Mujtaba leads the iPhone Systems Engineering team and specializes in wireless systems engineering, architecture, and design. Other companies who are on the NFC Forum board of directors include Broadcom, Google, Intel, Nokia, NXP Semiconductors, Qualcomm, Samsung, Sony, STMicroelectronics, Visa, and MasterCard. Apple began using NFC with the iPhone 6 and 6 Plus, which include the technology to facilitate wireless payments using Apple Pay. Apple has also included NFC chips in the Apple Watch, the iPad Air 2, and the iPad mini 3, and will continue using NFC in future

12.9-Inch 'iPad Pro' Rumored to Feature NFC, Bluetooth Stylus, Force Touch and USB-C

The much-rumored 12.9-inch so-called "iPad Pro" will feature a built-in NFC chip, pressure-sensitive Bluetooth stylus, Force Touch and USB-C port, according to AppleInsider. The report, citing a source familiar with Apple's future product plans, also claims that the larger iPad will have a new touchscreen with improved latency and unsurprisingly be powered by Apple's latest A-series processor. A purported "iPad Pro" blueprint from December 2014 with possible dimensions The inclusion of an NFC chip will enable the iPad Pro to be used as an Apple Pay payment terminal, although it is unlikely the tablet itself will have tap-to-pay functionality, according to the report. Apple Pay contactless payments are currently limited to the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus, and iPhone 5, iPhone 5c or iPhone 5s when paired with an Apple Watch, in the United States. Meanwhile, the report corroborates well-informed KGI Securities analyst Ming-Chi Kuo's claim that the iPad Pro will feature an Apple-built stylus, which AppleInsider says will connect via Bluetooth and allow pressure-sensitive input. The iPad Pro's display will also reportedly feature Force Touch, a technology that distinguishes between a tap and a deep press on the screen. The report adds that the iPad Pro's USB-C port will either replace or supplement the Lightning connector equipped on other current iPads:"The source also said that Apple's new, larger iPad will also feature a USB-C input, though they didn't indicate whether it would be a new, second port option, or if USB-C would replace the Lightning connector found on