How to Create Alarms on Your HomePod

HomePod, much like an iPhone or iPad, can be used as an alarm clock replacement to wake you up in the morning or remind you of important tasks.

Using HomePod as an alarm clock is simple, but it is controlled separately than alarms on your iPhone and there are a few tricks to be aware of.


Setting Using Siri


The easiest way to set an alarm on the HomePod is to ask Siri. Siri can set a one-time alarm for you, or Siri can set recurring alarms that go off every day. Some sample commands:
  • Hey Siri, set an alarm for 10:00 a.m
  • Hey Siri, set an alarm for 9:00 a.m. every weekday
  • Hey Siri, set an alarm for 10:00 a.m. every Tuesday and Thursday
  • Hey Siri, set an alarm for 2:00 p.m. labeled Flight Check-In
  • Hey Siri, set an alarm for 9:00 a.m. every weekend
TIP: Labeling your alarms makes it easier for you to remember them and to reference them again when giving commands to Siri.

Managing Alarms Using Siri


You can manage your alarms with Siri, too. For example, if you want to delete an alarm, you can say something like "Hey Siri, delete the 2:00 p.m. alarm," or "Hey Siri, delete all of my alarms."

Changing an alarm is also possible, with a command like "Hey Siri, change the 2:00 p.m. alarm to 3:00 p.m, and if you want to know what alarms you have set up, say "Hey Siri, what alarms do I have on?"

Siri will run through all alarms that are set up on the HomePod with that command.

Managing and Setting Alarms in the Home App


Alarms that you set up on the HomePod through Siri can be viewed and managed in the Home app.

  1. Open up the Home app.

  2. 3D Touch or long press on the HomePod icon on the main screen.

  3. Tap "Alarms."

The "Alarms" section of the HomePod in the Home app looks a lot like the Alarm portion of the Clock app on the iPhone, so if you've used that, it should be immediately familiar.

If you tap the "+" button, you can set a new alarm, and if you tap the "Edit" button, you can edit or delete an existing alarm. Tapping one of the toggles next to an alarm turns it off temporarily.


With any alarm that you set or edit, you can add a time, cause it to repeat, and change the label.

NOTE: Prior to the HomePod's release, there were rumors suggesting users would be able to set songs as custom ringtones for the alarm feature of the HomePod, but that is not possible. There is no option to change the default sound of the alarm on the HomePod.

Disabling an Alarm


When an alarm goes off on the HomePod, an alarm sound activates and the top of the HomePod flashes with a white light. To turn it off, you simply need to tap the top of the HomePod.

If you don't have a free hand, you can also ask Siri to turn off the alarm: "Hey Siri, turn off the alarm." To snooze an alarm, you can say "Hey Siri, snooze" and it will snooze for a short period of time before the alarm goes off again.

Related Roundup: HomePod
Buyer's Guide: HomePod (Buy Now)


Top Rated Comments

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2 weeks ago
It is possible to snooze an alarm. The catch is that your have to speak the command: “Hey Siri, snooze”
Rating: 4 Votes
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2 weeks ago
Damn shameful you can't have the alarm set to a playlist, song or radio station on AM. This seems like a day 1 kind of feature for a device like this.
Rating: 3 Votes
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2 weeks ago
How about setting a "sleep" alarm for an audio device? The fact that you can't have your podcasts shut off after a certain amount of time kills about 33% of the usefulness of the home pod for me. It's a shame that so many day-1 features are missing.

I have a feeling that Apple knows all of this, and it was either ship HomePod with V1.0 Hardware V0.75 software, or ship Q1 2019 with 1.0 Hardware and 1.0 software.
Rating: 2 Votes
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2 weeks ago
This is really TERRIBLE.... the alarm feature should:
1) be able to play Apple Music playlist or radio station or genre
2) be able to fade on over X minutes
3) allow you to set the volume of the alarm
Rating: 1 Votes
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2 weeks ago

It is possible to snooze an alarm. The catch is that your have to speak the command: “Hey Siri, snooze”


This is what happens when a website focuses on quantity of articles rather than quality. Thanks for being their fact checker!
Rating: 1 Votes
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