New Mac Pro Facing Lengthy Delivery Estimates, Possibly Due to Coronavirus

Last week, we reported that many custom iMac, iMac Pro, and MacBook Pro configurations are facing longer-than-usual delivery estimates on Apple's online store in the United States.

The reason for the delays is unconfirmed, but it could be related to the Wuhan coronavirus outbreak in China that has forced many of Apple's suppliers to temporarily close their factories and suspend production. While some factories are beginning to resume operations, initial production appears to be limited.


In any case, the delay has extended to the new Mac Pro. In many European countries, for example, the base model without any customizations is currently estimated for delivery on March 10. While the new Mac Pro is assembled in the United States for orders placed in the Americas, European orders are assembled in China.

The new Mac Pro also has a February 24-26 delivery estimate in the United States, despite being assembled in Texas, possibly because some components are still sourced from temporarily-closed suppliers in China.

The coronavirus outbreak is a fluid situation, so it remains unclear what its impact might be on upcoming Apple products. Last month, analyst Ming-Chi Kuo outlined his expectations for several new Apple products in the first half of 2020, including refreshed MacBook Pro/Air models, refreshed iPad Pro models with a triple-lens rear camera system, Tile-like item tracking tags, high-end wireless headphones, a small wireless charging mat, and a new lower-cost 4.7-inch iPhone.

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Top Rated Comments

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6 days ago at 07:23 am
Always thought you’d never have a virus problem with a Mac.
Rating: 29 Votes
6 days ago at 07:09 am


I was under the impression these were built in USA, or is it due to component shortages.

More like designed and assembled in USA, the rest all over the world but mainly China.

Did you even bother to read the article?
Rating: 20 Votes
6 days ago at 07:48 am


Who wants to reinvent the wheel? I do know that as soon as the wheel was invented it was not then outsourced right away to china to be manufactured.

your quote should read ”You do what makes Cents...”


I run a small business manufacturing scientific toys in China, we have the factory in China build the toys for $5-7 per unit (shipped by sea), and sell the toy for $29.95-$49.95 on Amazon. My brother and I inherited it from our late father. First thing we did was look into sourcing from a US factory. The most cost effective build was $14/unit (when you factor in US trucking instead of China shipping)... the Canada quote was at $11/unit... both the US and Canada factories would need to source certain parts from China because the subcomponent parts are simply not made/shipped here, either they never were or they no longer are.

Apple deals with this on a massive scale, but us little guys have the same problem... even if you want it "Made in America", don't be surprised when something inside the product isn't from here.
Rating: 14 Votes
6 days ago at 07:18 am


I was under the impression these were built in USA, or is it due to component shortages.

More like designed and assembled in USA, the rest all over the world but mainly China.

Seriously, you guys have to get off this. Electronics are going to have components sourced from China. It's what they do. Not everything can or even should be made in the USA. You do what makes sense. It makes no sense to re-invent the wheel.
Rating: 8 Votes
6 days ago at 07:03 am
I was under the impression these were built in USA, or is it due to component shortages.

More like designed and assembled in USA, the rest all over the world but mainly China.
Rating: 4 Votes
5 days ago at 02:50 pm


Are you willing to pay double the current price for a Mac to be built with all American sourced parts? Hmmmm?


I'm sorry, but there is no possible way that sourcing the parts for the MacPro from a country other than China would double its cost. Most of these components are made in automated facilities with little to no human involvement. The little there is, is not a serious actor in its cost. What there is though, is a commitment by China, Taiwan, Korea and others, to subsidize the cost of semiconductor fabs and provide financial assistance to employers to build advanced manufacturing facilities, whereas our government explicitly does not. The most we can get is localities giving tax breaks. We are stupid.
Rating: 3 Votes
6 days ago at 11:56 am
The idea that every American is smart enough to get a graduate degree and land a high end white collar job is unrealistic. Likewise, the US doesn’t need 100 million Subpar engineers, lawyers, scientists, etc.
In fact, the insistence that every American is owed such an education and job, has driven down the quality of graduates and jobs in the US.
Contrary to popular ivory tower belief there are a multitude of Americans that would be perfectly happy assembling electronics (or whatever) for decent pay, over flipping burgers or clerking gas stations.
(I said DECENT pay, above fast food pay but below engineer pay.)
When the politicians and their media lackeys quit pushing such nonsense, maybe then the US can get back to it’s great manufacturing roots and we won’t have 96 million people not in the work force, nor failing colleges flooded with unnecessary students racking up tons of debt.
Rating: 3 Votes
6 days ago at 07:36 am


Seriously, you guys have to get off this. Electronics are going to have components sourced from China. It's what they do. Not everything can or even should be made in the USA. You do what makes sense. It makes no sense to re-invent the wheel.


Who wants to reinvent the wheel? I do know that as soon as the wheel was invented it was not then outsourced right away to china to be manufactured.

your quote should read ”You do what makes Cents...”
Rating: 3 Votes
6 days ago at 07:57 am
just buy a new iMac with the i9 processor and the Vega 48 video card option and SAVE YOURSELF a TON of CASH with close performance

I just found out that my iMac can take 128GB of RAM. originally when I bought the machine I thought only 64GB. 128GB ram in a regular iMac not a iMac Pro is an awesome future proof machine
Rating: 2 Votes
6 days ago at 08:17 am
Macs are less than 8% of Apple's total revenue in the recently reported quarter. >80% of Macs are notebooks and only a fraction of the desktops are Mac Pros. We're talking about less than 1% of Apple's total revenue, probably closer to 0.5%.

Apple finances will be challenged if the coronavirus outbreak affects iPhone production. Mac production? Not so much.
Rating: 2 Votes

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