Samsung Galaxy S11 Said to Boast 108-Megapixel Camera and 5x Telephoto Lens

Samsung aims to usurp Apple's iPhone camera supremacy next year with a massive overhaul to the cameras on its flagship phones, reports Bloomberg.

Galaxy S11+ Render from @OnLeaks
Its upcoming Galaxy S11 will sport a 108-megapixel sensor for the main camera -- versus the iPhone 11's 12 -- flanked by three more on the back of the device including an ultrawide-angle lens and 5x optical zoom, they said. The marquee device will also adopt a time-of-flight sensor for depth detection similar to one already in the Note 10+, a feature that can aid portrait photos and augmented-reality applications, the people said, asking not to be identified discussing specifications that haven’t been made public.
The high-resolution sensor and 5x zoom camera will also feature in its second Galaxy Fold device, which is expected to be unveiled in February, around the same time as the launch of the Galaxy S11 launch, according to Bloomberg. Affiliate Samsung Electro-Mechanics Co. developed the 5x zoom module, which went into production earlier this year.

The arsenal of lenses planned for the rear of the S11 are said to be a key part of Samsung's bid to outshine Apple in next year's smartphone stakes, with 5G connectivity and foldable devices forming the other core pillars of its head-start hardware strategy. Apple's next generation of flagship smartphones aren't expected to arrive until several months later in the fall.

Apple made major changes to the rear camera system in the 2019 ‌iPhone‌ lineup with the new triple-lens setup of the iPhone 11 Pro and Pro Max, and 2020 is expected to bring even more camera improvements.

Rumors suggest Apple will add a laser-powered time-of-flight 3D rear camera to the iPhone 12 Pro, which will bring significant improvements in augmented reality experiences.

The camera is said to be able to scan areas up to 15 feet from the device. Apple's front-facing TrueDepth camera uses similar 3D technology but because it's infrared and not laser-powered, it only works at distances of 25 to 50 centimeters.

Apple plans to release an all-OLED lineup in 2020 consisting of 5.4-inch, two 6.1-inch, and 6.7-inch models in the second half of the year, according to the latest prediction from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo.

The 6.1-inch "‌iPhone 12‌ Pro" and 6.7-inch "‌iPhone 12‌ Pro Max" are expected to feature a triple-lens rear camera. So far, rumors indicate these two higher-end iPhones will use the new time-of-flight rear camera, so it may not be available in the lower-end iPhones that are going to have a lower price tag.

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8 weeks ago
Might as well just get it over with and make the bump the same length and width as the entire phone now.
Rating: 14 Votes
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8 weeks ago
The camera as a main feature upgrade of a phone at this point is... boring.
Rating: 9 Votes
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8 weeks ago
The unfortunate thing is that my purchasing decisions are only 10 or 20 percent swayed by hardware. Does the phone run iOS? No. Well then, there’s nothing left to say.
Rating: 8 Votes
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8 weeks ago
Haha, reverting back to the megapixel wars.

The sad part is some people will actually believe 108 megapixels makes the sensor 108 times better.
Rating: 6 Votes
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8 weeks ago
All I will say is that we should all consider ourselves lucky that we have multiple companies trying to push forward and create better products (camera's) for us, the customers.
Whoever does it, you should be happy.
If someone comes up with something that works better than what we already have and is successful due to it, then this will be copied in some way by other companies raising the standard for everyone to enjoy.
Just think how bad phones would be today, if only 1 company made them with no competition.

I look forward to all improvements, and so should we all. :)
Rating: 4 Votes
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8 weeks ago


I know you’re right and I’m in the minority, but I actually print out, give away, and display about .5-1% of my pictures, which is quite a few. I switched my from a digital camera to my iPhone, purely for convenience, and I have definitely felt the difference, but they’re doing better and better.

When the iPhone went up to 12 megapixels, it meant that many of my uncropped pics could be printed at 11x14, and even things that I zoomed and cropped could be printed at 8x10 and look good. I can’t imagine the fun I’d have with 108!

But Samsung means android, and I’m in too deep.

I have a 40”x50” print of Bryce Canyon that originated from my 6.3 megapixel 2003 Canon 300D (Canon’s first consumer dSLR) and a 75-300mm lens. I thought it was going to be blocky as hell but it looks great. I have no idea how they did it.
Rating: 3 Votes
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8 weeks ago


Do people seriously switch hardware year over year from Samsung to Apple? Are people actually going to stop using 12 years of iOS, iCloud storage, Apple Pay, Apple Music and all of our purchased apps and switch to Samsung over a 100 megapixel camera? With extreme lock-in each platform has now with services, I simply don't have time to spend a week setting up a phone and finding apps for another platform only to switch back to iOS next year.

I have tried to make the switch. I’ve gotten close on a couple of phones. At most I can only get as far as keeping two phones on two lines and one large Note 10+ on WiFi as sort of a portable desktop and home entertainment setup.

iOS has some key features that I can’t part with. The ease of connecting with fellow iPhone users and sharing photos and videos with them in iMessage is hard to give up.

I like many aspects of Android better. The level of customization and versatility, on my Note especially, adds an ease to my day I don’t quite get on iOS. But it is an OS that puts marketing as a centerpiece to what it does. I’m not always comfortable with that.

Right now Android is a bit more stable overall as an OS but the individual apps are not. On iOS I find the overall OS still needs a lot of work but the individual apps that I use are generally of higher quality and stability.

If I can have only one, it would still be iOS and I do think very highly of my iPhone 11 Pro. I’m actually really content with it, to a level I haven’t been with a phone since my 2 years on an iPhone 4. I may actually stick with this one for 2 years. The photos I’m getting are already exactly the quality I’ve been wanting for years.
Rating: 3 Votes
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8 weeks ago
Marques Brownlee talks about the pro’s and con’s of a 108 MP camera that’s already available. If Samsung can implement it better than the phone shown in the video, I think it would be a great addition to flagship devices. The difference in sharpness of detail anywhere in the photo is impressive

[MEDIA=youtube]wegxoNTw0_I[/MEDIA]
Rating: 3 Votes
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8 weeks ago
I don't think cramming 108 MP in a tiny phone sensor is feasible. Sure, you'll get a great number for advertising but when you zoom all the way in on a photo it probably won't look as good as you'd expect it to. There's a reason why many professional cameras stick to 50 MP...

Also, I'm very curious to see how well camera apps perform with 108 MP, as Android isn't really known for good optimization.
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago


It’s always good to see the biggest competitor pushing the boundaries. Pixel counts are nowadays pronounced more as marketing, but 108 megapixel is 108 megapixel.


And this to me is a shock - that they are somehow are the biggest competitor. I have just bought my first ever mobile Samsung device (an S10) as it was a good price compared to the Pixel 4 which is an absurd proposition with it's battery life and cost. Previously I had each generation of the Pixel.

Comparing the photo quality to my Pro 11 though (in low light) it is quite a long way off and the software/experience is really poor compared to the "raw android" that I am used to. The hardware is nice to look at but once you start using it the curved screen is a pain. The shared power though is a really nice touch, that'll be really popular when it finally appears in an iPhone.

The main problem I have found though is that Samsung just seemed to of shipped out a device that they think people will want, rather than one that is tested to ensure they will want it. The underscreen fingerprint reader is awful. If it worked (which it never does first, rarely even second time) then it would be great.

It would be nice that rather than Samsung just throwing in some headline tech (like huge MP's), they actually tested it and developed it to be the best that it can be. How the Google hardware team keep missing the open goal is almost a mystery to me. It's almost as though they want to. If however Samsung and Google actually teamed up and merged the best of their two devices, it could be amazing.
Rating: 2 Votes
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