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Recalled 2015 15-Inch MacBook Pro Models With Faulty Batteries Banned From Flights in U.S.

Following a recall initiated by Apple, the Federal Aviation Administration has banned mid-2015 15-inch MacBook Pro models with faulty batteries from flights, reports Bloomberg.

Apple in June announced a voluntary recall and replacement program for 15-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌ models sold between September 2015 and February 2017 as these models may contain batteries that can overheat and pose a fire safety risk.


In a statement to Bloomberg, the Federal Aviation Administration said that major U.S. airlines have been notified about the recall and have been instructed to follow guidelines for goods with recalled batteries.

That means affected Apple laptops that have not received replacement batteries are not allowed on flights as cargo or in carry-on luggage, which is standard operating procedure.

Earlier this month, the European Union Aviation Safety Agency also warned European airlines to make sure affected ‌MacBook Pro‌ models are switched off and not used during flights.

Four cargo airlines, including TUI Group Airlines, Thomas Cook Airlines, Air Italy, and Air Transat have implemented bans that prevent the laptops from being brought on planes as cargo.
"Please note that the 15-inch Apple ‌MacBook Pro‌ laptop, sold between mid-2015 to February-2017 is prohibited on board any of our mandate carriers," a TCE operations coordinator wrote to employees.
TUI Group Airlines, based out of the UK, plans to begin making announcements about affected ‌MacBook Pro‌ models at the gate and prior to takeoff, but laptops with replaced batteries will not be affected. There is no word on whether similar announcements will be made at U.S. airports and other airports worldwide.

Apple has asked customers with a 15-inch mid-2015 ‌MacBook Pro‌ to stop using their machines until they can take the steps to have their batteries replaced. Users with a 2015 ‌MacBook Pro‌ can enter their Mac's serial number in the recall program website to check if their machine needs a replacement battery.

Apple has been offering free replacement batteries since June and has sent out emails to customers who are affected urging them to bring their ‌MacBook Pro‌ models in for repair. 2015 machines that have a fresh battery are allowed on planes as normal.

15-inch ‌MacBook Pro‌ models from 2015 that have faulty batteries are in danger of overheating and catching on fire. Approximately 432,000 potentially affected ‌MacBook Pro‌ units were sold in the United States, along with 26,000 in Canada.

Top Rated Comments

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10 weeks ago
How exactly are they going to screen for this? The average TSA employee probably doesn’t know a 2010 MBP from a 2019 MBP.

How did it work with the Galaxy phones? I can’t tell which Galaxy is which Lol.
Rating: 49 Votes
10 weeks ago
I wonder how they’ll check whether individual MacBook Pros are in the affected range? Will they have to plug the serial number into the website for every one? Plus, they look identical to retina MacBook Pros from 2012-2015, that’s going to be interesting.
Rating: 22 Votes
10 weeks ago

Samsung'd! Good thing they didn't talk smack when the Note 7 had its issue.


The Samsung exploding battery issue was on an entirely different level.

https://time.com/4526350/samsung-galaxy-note-7-recall-problems-overheating-fire/

Within a month after its August release:
“Samsung receives 92 reports of batteries overheating in Galaxy Note 7 phones in the U.S.; it says there were 26 reports of burns and 55 reports of property damage. A man in Florida says his vehicle caught fire when the Galaxy Note 7 smartphone charging inside his SUV burst into flames.”

Another month went by, millions of phones recalled, banned in airports, and this:
“On Oct. 9, Samsung stops exchanging recalled Note 7 devices due to reports of replacement phones catching fire, just as the original phones did.”

Two days later, Samsung announced they were ceasing production of the phone.

It’s incredible that people went back and bought phones from Samsung again. I know Apple customers are loyal, but wow, Samsung customers took it a bit beyond “loyal” in my opinion.
Rating: 17 Votes
10 weeks ago
Samsung'd! Good thing they didn't talk smack when the Note 7 had its issue.
Rating: 16 Votes
10 weeks ago
Great, due to TSA knowledge it's going to be no apple devices at all on flights.
Rating: 15 Votes
10 weeks ago
I have a 15-inch mid-2015 Retina MacBook Pro. It was purchased from Apple Store Online Refurbished. It has the Iris Pro 1536MB Graphics, not the MX370. I went to the Apple page, and plugged in the appropriate serial number for the unit, and this is what came up:



------------------------

So, apparently this mid-2015 Retina 15-inch MacBook Pro is a Refurbished model, and is not affected, and has a newer replaced battery. So how in the world are the airline security checks going to know this?? Without having a serial number checker on hand??
Rating: 11 Votes
10 weeks ago

Yikes! Will be so nice when we get beyond Li ion's.

They can replace them with the nuclear reactor technology the Russians are using to power their cruise missiles.
Rating: 8 Votes
10 weeks ago
Mine is not on the recall list. Maybe worth packing some documentation to prove it I guess.
Rating: 7 Votes
10 weeks ago

Samsung'd! Good thing they didn't talk smack when the Note 7 had its issue.

The Note 7 was recalled after a month and discontinued after 2 months. The Macs in question are 3-4 years old.
Rating: 7 Votes
10 weeks ago

I wonder how they’ll check whether individual MacBook Pros are in the affected range? Will they have to plug the serial number into the website for every one? Plus, they look identical to retina MacBook Pros from 2012-2015, that’s going to be interesting.

Even if they were on the ball and had a PC or tablet set up at the gate, connected to the website, to check serial numbers, getting the serial number from one machine (which may be in someone's carry-on and you have to tell them you need to look at it, and then explain why you need to look at it, "yes, really, yes, you", and then have them get it out, and turn it on, and maybe plug it in, and maybe boot it up, and maybe log in, to get to "About this Mac", and then read out/transcribe the serial number without error)... now multiply that by, say, 20 users... that's quite a pile-up at the gate.
Rating: 6 Votes

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