New in OS X: Get MacRumors Push Notifications on your Mac

Resubscribe Now Close

Apple Extends Free Repairs of Anti-Reflective Coating on Select MacBook and MacBook Pro Models

Apple has extended free repairs of anti-reflective coating issues for select MacBook and MacBook Pro models.


Apple has authorized coverage within four years from the original purchase date of affected models, according to an internal document distributed to Apple Authorized Service Providers and later obtained by MacRumors.

Eligible models, listed below, qualify for a free display replacement within the four-year coverage period. Check your receipt to determine the exact purchase date of your MacBook or MacBook Pro.

• MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2013)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2013)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2013)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2013)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2014)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2014)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2015)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2015)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)
• MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017)
• MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)
• MacBook (12-inch, Early 2015)
• MacBook (12-inch, Early 2016)
• MacBook (12-inch, Early 2017)

Apple's document states that all 2012 MacBook Pro models are no longer eligible since they were discontinued over four years ago.

Apple previously confirmed to us that this repair program continues to be handled internally rather than being publicly announced.

Affected customers can schedule a Genius Bar appointment at an Apple Store using the Apple Support app. Or, on the Get Support page, click Mac → Mac Notebooks → Hardware Issues → Display Issue and options should be presented to initiate a repair or contact Apple via phone, email, or online chat.

Apple's support website will ask for your Mac's serial number, which can be found by clicking on the Apple logo in the top-left corner of the screen and clicking on About This Mac in the dropdown menu.

We've learned that Apple has supposedly prohibited support advisors from mentioning details about the anti-reflective coating repair program in online chat sessions, so visiting an Apple Store may be required. If you contact Apple by phone, asking for your call to be escalated to a senior advisor may help.

Affected customers can also visit an Apple Authorized Service Provider to determine if their notebook is eligible for coverage. Apple's document states that these third-party repair shops can even replace displays with other damage free of charge so long as the anti-reflective coating issues are present.

Apple's internal document also states that customers who already incurred out-of-warranty costs related to this issue continue to be eligible for a refund, which can be initiated by contacting Apple support directly.

Apple first began this repair program in October 2015, and already extended it once, after some MacBook and MacBook Pro users experienced issues with the anti-reflective coating wearing off or delaminating on Retina displays.

The damage appears to be caused by a variety of factors, including the pressure of the keyboard and trackpad on the display when closed, and the use of incorrect third-party cleaning solutions with microfiber cloths.

Over 12,000 customers joined a Facebook group dedicated to the issue, and hundreds of others have claimed to be affected across the Apple Support Communities, MacRumors forums, Twitter, Reddit, and other discussion platforms. The website Staingate.org contains a gallery of damaged displays.

Related Roundup: MacBook Pro
Buyer's Guide: MacBook Pro (Caution)

Top Rated Comments

(View all)

25 months ago
For issues like this, repairs should be open indefinitely. It makes good business sense to be fixing problem products with little hassle on customers.
Rating: 10 Votes
25 months ago
Had this on my 2012 back in the day and i remember everyone on here being like „you must have been using it wrong!“.

Those were the days
Rating: 8 Votes
25 months ago
While I admire Apple (if true) for keeping on in taking care of this issue, I can't forget the long list of Apple knights denying the problem on these forums. And making fun of those affected. A lot of them are still posting nowadays with the usual arrogance. Reliable like a zero
Rating: 6 Votes
25 months ago

Yet. Took about 2 years for the issue to manifest itself on my 2015 rMBP. Apple replaced the display no questions asked of course.

edit:


Well, there you go.


Are you sure this issue doesn't affect new MBPs? Because some users on the forum said they had minor keyboard marks on the antireflective coating of their 2016 MBP.


I just contacted two different people on apple chat and they said this is not true and there was no document to support the claim. My 2013 MBP has the issue and they both stated its 3 years from the purchase date.


On with Apple Chat and got the same response as uznuts...program expired and has not been extended.


I was also just told the same thing on apple support chat.


So a couple of people in this thread have already stated that the Apple reps they've talked to stated that the information in this story is untrue. So where did MacRumors get this info? I have this problem on my 2013 MBP and thought that I had missed my opportunity to get it fixed. I'm hoping this story is true but I don't want to waste my time going to an Apple Store only to have them tell me that I have to pay full price to get a display replacement.



* This information is sourced directly from an internal document shared by Apple with Apple Authorized Service Providers through its internal "GSX" system. I can't provide screenshots or any additional information, as this would potentially put my source at risk of losing his or her job, but I can ensure that the document is real, comes from Apple, and isn't fake news.


* Unfortunately there seems to be a typical discrepancy between what Apple shares in GSX and what they choose to publicly acknowledge. What I can say is that when I spoke with Apple's online chat about this recently, I was told that online support advisors are no longer authorized to discuss this particular repair program on the web and that I must visit an Apple Store.


* I've received a related document that also lists all 12-inch MacBook models (2015/2016/2017) and all 2016/2017 MacBook Pro models under an "affected products" list as well. It says each notebook with anti-reflective coating issues can get up to two free display replacements per serial number. This is supposed to be at the Genius Bar or by visiting an Apple Authorized Service Provider.

I've updated my article with the new info I've learned. Unfortunately that is all I have to share right now.
Rating: 6 Votes
6 weeks ago
FIXED! --- Scheduled an appointment with Genius bar and went to the apple store. They stated my Macbook was too old to be eligible (Retina, 15-inch, Mid 2015).
I called Apple at 1800-275-2273 and told them about staingate and was very friendly to the rep. They were able to resolve even though it was a few months passed the replacement window. They are sending me a box to ship in for free repair. Hope this helps!

If they deny you, keep calling and perhaps you will get a friendlier Apple rep that can help you.




('https://www.macrumors.com/2017/11/17/apple-extends-free-staingate-repairs/')


Apple has extended free repairs of anti-reflective coating issues ('https://www.macrumors.com/2015/03/16/retina-macbook-pro-stained-coating/') for select MacBook and MacBook Pro models.



Apple has authorized coverage within four years from the original purchase date of affected models, according to an internal document distributed to Apple Authorized Service Providers and later obtained by MacRumors.

Eligible models, listed below, qualify for a free display replacement within the four-year coverage period. Check your receipt to determine the exact purchase date of your MacBook or MacBook Pro.
o MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2013)
o MacBook Pro (15-inch, Early 2013)
o MacBook Pro (13-inch, Late 2013)
o MacBook Pro (15-inch, Late 2013)
o MacBook Pro (13-inch, Mid 2014)
o MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2014)
o MacBook Pro (13-inch, Early 2015)
o MacBook Pro (15-inch, Mid 2015)
o MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2016)
o MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2016)
o MacBook Pro (13-inch, 2017)
o MacBook Pro (15-inch, 2017)
o MacBook (12-inch, Early 2015)
o MacBook (12-inch, Early 2016)
o MacBook (12-inch, Early 2017)Apple's document states that all 2012 MacBook Pro models are no longer eligible since they were discontinued over four years ago.

Apple previously confirmed to us that this repair program continues to be handled internally rather than being publicly announced.

Affected customers can schedule a Genius Bar appointment at an Apple Store using the Apple Support app ('https://geo.itunes.apple.com/us/app/apple-support/id1130498044?mt=8'). Or, on the Get Support page ('https://getsupport.apple.com/'), click Mac -> Mac Notebooks -> Hardware Issues -> Display Issue and options should be presented to initiate a repair or contact Apple via phone, email, or online chat.

Apple's support website will ask for your Mac's serial number, which can be found by clicking on the Apple logo in the top-left corner of the screen and clicking on About This Mac in the dropdown menu.

We've learned that Apple has supposedly prohibited support advisors from mentioning details about the anti-reflective coating repair program in online chat sessions, so visiting an Apple Store may be required. If you contact Apple by phone, asking for your call to be escalated to a senior advisor may help.

Affected customers can also visit an Apple Authorized Service Provider to determine if their notebook is eligible for coverage. Apple's document states that these third-party repair shops can even replace displays with other damage free of charge so long as the anti-reflective coating issues are present.

Apple's internal document also states that customers who already incurred out-of-warranty costs related to this issue continue to be eligible for a refund, which can be initiated by contacting Apple support ('https://getsupport.apple.com/') directly.

Apple first began this repair program ('https://www.macrumors.com/2015/10/17/apple-mbp-ar-coating-quality-program-staingate/') in October 2015, and already extended it once ('https://www.macrumors.com/2017/02/24/apple-extended-anti-reflective-repair-program/'), after some MacBook and MacBook Pro users experienced issues with the anti-reflective coating wearing off or delaminating on Retina displays.

The damage appears to be caused by a variety of factors, including the pressure of the keyboard and trackpad on the display when closed, and the use of incorrect third-party cleaning solutions with microfiber cloths.

Over 12,000 customers joined a Facebook group ('https://www.facebook.com/groups/607572909386595/about/') dedicated to the issue, and hundreds of others have claimed to be affected across the Apple Support Communities, MacRumors forums, Twitter, Reddit, and other discussion platforms. The website Staingate.org ('http://www.staingate.org/') contains a gallery of damaged displays.

Article Link: Apple Extends Free Repairs of Anti-Reflective Coating on Select MacBook and MacBook Pro Models ('https://www.macrumors.com/2017/11/17/apple-extends-free-staingate-repairs/')

Rating: 4 Votes
9 months ago
UPDATE: Got it done! I was very courteous on the phone with Apple on my 1st call, asking them about the extension of the program from 3 to 4 years, which they confirmed after talking to a supervisor (Although the guy did not ask me the exact day I had bought the MacBook). Then I went to an Apple Store. On the 1st try, the Genius Bar lady came back saying that I would have to pay for it, and again I was very courteous in asking about the extension and telling her about the conversation I had had with Apple on the phone before going to the store. She checked and saw the notes on my account from that phone call. She went in again to talk to the manager and came back telling me that although I had missed the 4 year due date for a month, the manager still authorized to cover for the repair. Since they didn't have the replacement screen at that store and they had to keep the computer for 7 to 10 days to ship it out to have it repaired, I asked the lady if she could check for me if the part was available at another store. She kindly set it up for me calling another Apple Store 10 miles away and I went there right away with a printed order. Got there, the guy told me that there was no way they could get it done the same day and it could be ready in 2 days. Left the store and got a phone call an hour later from a guy that had my computer open and asked if I wanted to replace the battery that was swollen. Told them no, only the screen. An hour later the computer was ready, and picked it up with no cost. Apple covered the whole $680 replacement cost. So, I would say that within the 4 year coverage by the program, you should be ok. If you bought the Mac more than 4 years ago, be kind and courteous and know that managers should be allowed to authorize the replacement with no cost for you. I would do it with no delay. Good luck!
Rating: 3 Votes
9 weeks ago
Macrumors: "The damage appears to be caused by a variety of factors, including the pressure of the keyboard and trackpad on the display when closed, and the use of incorrect third-party cleaning solutions with microfiber cloths." NOTE: Non of my AR issues have occurred anywhere beyond the black bezel - nothing in the middle of the screen and no key "outlines".

What a load of B.S. Anyone with common sense and logic can see that even on the 15" model there are no keys or any protruding elements that touch the black bezel and in fact the black bezel is recessed to further ensure nothing hits the bezel area, therefore its an issue with how the AR coating is applied (phase deposition). Blaming the owner for damaging their own hardware is unacceptable especially when people such as myself don't use chemicals / solvents / sprays and simply use plain old water.

It starts initially as a spot / mark that simply looks like dried water then when you clean the screen as recommended by apple with a lint-free cloth this effectively breaks down the coating and then air on its own will allow the coating to keep degrading of its own accord. Im now up to system two (mid 2015 Macbook Pro that was provided as a replacement system in July 2017) and have already contacted Apple executive relations as I don't want to go down this path again like I did with the previous system.
Rating: 3 Votes
25 months ago
I had this on my 2015 MBP, it appeared with a few months. Finally got the screen replaced, yet, of course, that cost me £30+ because I have to travel to an Apple store (UK Apple stores are few and far between, and our trains are outrageously priced). I also had to sacrifice an afternoon of labour.

All in all, not exactly “free” for something that is entirely Apple’s fault and not mine.
Rating: 3 Votes
25 months ago



* This information is sourced directly from an internal document shared by Apple with Apple Authorized Service Providers through its internal "GSX" system. I can't provide screenshots or any additional information, as this would potentially put my source at risk of losing his or her job, but I can ensure that the document is real, comes from Apple, and isn't fake news.


* Unfortunately there seems to be a typical discrepancy between what Apple shares in GSX and what they choose to publicly acknowledge. What I can say is that when I spoke with Apple's online chat about this recently, I was told that online support advisors are no longer authorized to discuss this particular repair program on the web and that I must visit an Apple Store.


* I've received a related document that also lists all 12-inch MacBook models (2015/2016/2017) and all 2016/2017 MacBook Pro models under an "affected products" list as well. It says each notebook with anti-reflective coating issues can get up to two free display replacements per serial number. This is supposed to be at the Genius Bar or by visiting an Apple Authorized Service Provider.

I've updated my article with the new info I've learned. Unfortunately that is all I have to share right now.


I hope it works out. I hate wasting our readers' time. I don't want people to show up for a Genius Bar appointment and be turned away. This document is real. It's recent. It's from Apple. I don't understand why they so often don't seem to acknowledge these internal policies that *they* set.


Thank you Joe. I'm glad MacRumors have such a concerned editor.
Your work and your words have a huge value for us.
Rating: 3 Votes
25 months ago

For issues like this, repairs should be open indefinitely. It makes good business sense to be fixing problem products with little hassle on customers.


I agree where the issues are not the customers' fault in any way. There are lemon laws in some places for cars etc, should work the same for computers, everywhere, especially at Apple's prices. But as you say, it's also just smart business to have happy repeat customers who spread positive experiences through word of mouth.
Rating: 3 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]