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'Nest' Articles

Google Kills Off Nest Thermostat App for Apple Watch

Google has killed its Nest app for Apple Watch, meaning Nest smart thermostat owners can no longer control the device's target temperature and operating mode directly from their wrist. The deprecation of the wearable apps for both ‌Apple Watch‌ and Wear OS coincides with version 5.37 of the Nest mobile app, which was released on Tuesday. Any mention of the ‌Apple Watch‌ app has since been removed from the Nest App Store listing, while Wear OS device users who try to launch the app from their watch are now met with the message "Nest is no longer supported for Wear OS" and are advised to uninstall the app. Google's reason for the watch app's demise is simple. According to the company (via 9to5Google), "only a small number of people" used the watch apps, therefore Nest will focus on developing its full mobile app and Wear OS-only Google Assistant functions going forward. We took a look at Nest app users on smart watches and found that only a small number of people were using it. Moving forward our team will spend more time focusing on delivering high quality experiences through mobile apps and voice interactions.Google advises Nest owners that they can no longer adjust their thermostat or change the Home/Away mode from their ‌Apple Watch‌, but these actions can still be controlled remotely via the Nest mobile app, which can also still deliver notifications to their watch. The Nest app joins a long line of high-profile ‌Apple Watch‌ apps that have met their demise over the last two years. Beginning in 2017, Twitter, Google Maps, Amazon, and eBay all quietly

Nest's $39 Room Temperature Sensors Now Available to Order

Nest's new Temperature Sensor, which works with the company's latest Learning Thermostat and the Thermostat E, is available to buy online from today. The battery-powered, inch-wide sensors are designed to be placed in different rooms around the house where they silently monitor how warm or cold it is. The white puck-shaped sensors continually relay this information to the companion thermostat, which responds by adjusting the central heating system to keep those rooms at the temperature level the user specified. Nest started taking pre-orders for the Temperature Sensor in March, but is now selling them direct from the website. Each sensor costs $39, or $99 for a three-pack, and comes with wall mounting screws and up to 2 years of battery life. Up to six sensors are supported per connected thermostat, and up to 18 are supported per home. Customers looking to pick up a Nest Learning Thermostat or Nest Thermostat E can also order the Temperature Sensor as part of a bundle pack, which gets them $20 or $10 off the standard price for a single sensor, respectively. Nest products don't integrate with Apple's HomeKit setup, but are popular competing connected home solutions. See the Nest website for more

Nest Now Shipping 'Hello' Smart Doorbell With Night-Vision Camera and Two-Way Audio

Nest has begun shipping the Hello, a smart doorbell that's capable of streaming 160 degree HD live video from your door directly to your phone. First announced back in September, the $229 doorbell device can take a photo of a person standing on your doorstep before the bell is even rung, and also supports two-way audio so you can speak with them. The doorbell features a 3-megapixel camera with infrared night vision and records 1,600 × 1,200 video at 30 frames per second. The Hello also has a 160-degree field of view, and is 802.11 a/b/g/n Wi-Fi compatible. It stores up to three hours of video out of the box, with additional storage available by taking up a Nest Aware subscription. In addition to shipping Hello orders via its online store, Nest also announced it is now shipping the $249 Nest x Yale Lock, a tamper-proof deadbolt front door lock with touchpad that connects to the Nest app. The touchpad means owners can give people they trust a passcode instead of a key for entry, and the door it's attached to can be locked and unlocked wirelessly. Lastly, Nest also revealed that it is now taking pre-orders for its new wireless external temperature sensors for the Nest Learning Thermostat and Thermostat E. Owners can add up to six of the battery-powered, inch-wide sensors, each of which cost $39, or $99 for a three-pack. Nest also says it plans to bundle its thermostats with the temperature sensors after they officially hit stores in April. Nest products don't integrate with Apple's HomeKit setup, but are popular competing connected home solutions. See

Nest Announces New Alarm System, Smart Doorbell, and Outdoor Cam IQ

Alphabet-owned Nest Labs today held an event in San Francisco to unveil a whole new range of Nest home security products. Nest products don't integrate with Apple's HomeKit setup, but are popular competing connected home solutions. Starting in 2018, Nest will release the Hello, a small smart doorbell device that's able to stream 160 degree HD live video from your door directly to your phone. It will capture a photo of a person standing at your door even when the bell isn't rung, and the Hello supports audio so you can speak with whoever's at the door. With Nest's $10 monthly service, Hello will continually monitor all activity outside the door, and Nest is working on features like Warm Welcome, which will activate a light as someone approaches the door, both as a greeting and to ward off thieves. Nest plans to release the Hello Doorbell Cam in early 2018, but a price hasn't been provided. Nest also introduced the new Nest Cam IQ Outdoor, the outdoor sibling of the Nest Cam IQ announced in late May. Nest Cam IQ Outdoor is weatherproof (with an IP66 rating) and offers the same 4K high-quality recording and smart features like facial recognition and smart alerts. It comes with a tamper-resistant mount, and with Nest Aware ($10/month), features 10 days of recording and facial recognition. At $349, the Nest Cam IQ Outdoor is $50 more expensive than the indoor version. Nest has also announced plans to bring Google Assistant to its Nest Cam IQ Indoor, with the feature available to all current and future Nest Cam IQ owners. Nest's biggest announcement this

Nest Announces the Thermostat E With a New Design and a Lower Price

Nest today announced the $169 Nest Thermostat E, a more affordable version of its original $250 smart home thermostat from 2011 with most of the same features, but with a less conspicuous design. Replacing the metallic look of its predecessor, the new HVAC energy-saving device features a soft-touch plastic white control ring around a black display, which lies behind a frosted screen to make the thermostat blend in to most home environments. The display itself offers a more basic readout than previous Nest's, showing the temperature only. When the frosted display is off, the screen is grey. When it’s on, it displays soft text and images that are designed to be easy to see and read with a slight glow. The display uses an ambient light sensor to share information at just the right brightness. Meanwhile the unit's innards have been simplified, which means the Thermostat E doesn't offer the same wide compatibility with various U.S. domestic setups as the pricier device, so check before ordering. Like the original Nest, the Thermostat E learns the user's temperature preferences over time, smartly adjusting them on the fly depending on the circumstances. Alternatively, the Thermostat E can be set up on a simple schedule, based on an average of thousands of schedules already learned by the company's devices. Users can adjust temperature using the control ring or via Nest's iOS app for remote access. The Thermostat E costs $169, while the original Nest Learning Thermostat will remain available to buy for $250. The new thermostat can be ordered from Thursday on

Nest Will Automatically Pre-Cool Homes Participating in New 'Solar Eclipse Rush Hour' Program

Smart thermostat company Nest this week announced a new energy saving initiative coming on the day of the total solar eclipse, August 21, 2017. During the eclipse, clean solar energy will be reduced and in some areas of the United States traditional power plants will have to fire up in order to cover the energy shortfall for a brief period of time. Nest's solution is a "Solar Eclipse Rush Hour" setting that will be sent to thermostats across the U.S. days ahead of the eclipse. The program will help offset the drop in energy production during the eclipse by automatically pre-cooling homes ahead of time. Once users notice the message, and agree to participate, the Nest Thermostat will lower the temperature of their home before the eclipse. So, we’re encouraging people across the US to help offset this drop in energy production by pre-cooling their homes before the eclipse. If you don’t own a Nest thermostat, you can manually adjust the temperature by one or two degrees during the eclipse. If you join, a few hours before the eclipse hits your area, your Nest Thermostat may automatically pre-cool your home so that you can save energy during the eclipse. After the eclipse, your thermostat will go back to its regular schedule. The company said that with enough Nest devices participating, users will be able to "meaningfully reduce" energy demand during the eclipse. Of course, if the temperature becomes too warm during the time of the eclipse, users can still manually change the temperature at any time. Once the eclipse has ended, Nest will go back to its regular schedule of

HomeKit Support for Nest Smart Products Unlikely Anytime Soon

Rumors that smart thermostat maker Nest is considering adding Apple HomeKit support to its product range appear to be premature, according to a report on Thursday. AppleInsider spoke to a Nest employee who apparently confirmed there are "no immediate plans" to support Apple's smart home platform and "no roadmap" for such a migration. The rumors were apparently stoked by Apple's announcement at the Worldwide Developers Conference that it has taken steps to make it easier for third parties to integrate the smart home platform into their devices, followed by a comment recently attributed to Nest that it would "consider HomeKit". At the present time, HomeKit-enabled smart products require a hardware authentication chip to make them compatible with Apple's Made-For-iPhone program. At WWDC, however, Apple said it was updating its specification so that smart products won't have to include a hardware chip and will be able to authenticate through software instead. The news sparked suggestions that some older products could theoretically be upgraded to support HomeKit using a firmware upgrade. HomeKit has enjoyed fairly wide support among smart gadget manufacturers, but the Google-owned Nest brand has never been on that list. Apple removed Nest products from its stores in 2015 shortly after the first HomeKit-compatible products became available for purchase. Nest owners needn't completely give up hope for HomeKit support, as manufacturers have occasionally added the standard to products via upgrades well after they have come to market. Add to that Apple's looser

Nest Announces Cam IQ, a $299 4K Smart Home Camera With Facial Recognition

Nest unveiled a new smart security camera today called the Nest Cam IQ, an indoor 4K device capable of increasing footage resolution when it detects unusual or suspicious activity in the home. Using built-in smart capabilities powered by Google's AI for facial recognition, the Nest Cam IQ is able to identify a person in its visual range, which automatically triggers a notification alert that includes a zoomed-in photo of the figure. A variation on the same feature called "Supersight" appears in the mobile app feed, as a zoomed picture-in-picture inset of any figures identified in the camera's field of view. The Nest Cam IQ also tracks the subject as it moves and provides a close-up of the face to make it easier to spot identifying features. Additional smart features are in store for Nest owners who sign up to a Nest Aware subscription, such as the ability to identify and remember family members and trusted familiar faces, as well as the ability to recognize specific audio cues like conversations and barking dogs. Elsewhere, the Nest Cam IQ comes with a weighted base and tilting head, invisible infrared LED emitters, high-powered speakers, and a three-microphone array for improved background noise suppression and echo cancelation. The Nest Cam IQ costs $299 in the U.S. and can be pre-ordered today on the company's website, which also sells the Nest Cam and Nest Cam Outdoor. Shipping is expected to start at the end of

Nest Earth Day Discounts Include $30 Off Learning Thermostat, $50 Off Combo Purchase With Google Home

Nest recently announced a new discount has launched for customers looking to purchase the company's Nest Learning Thermostat, allowing them to buy the IoT temperature-controlling device for $219 on its website, totaling $30 in savings. Nest founder and chief product officer Matt Rogers announced the temporary deal in a blog post this week, which he said is tied into upcoming celebrations surrounding Earth Day. As such, Nest Learning Thermostat's $219 price tag will only remain available to customers until Earth Day, on Saturday, April 22. In the post, Rogers mentioned that since the Nest Learning Thermostat's launch in 2011, the device has "saved over 12 billion kWh of energy," which equates to "enough to power New York City for 81 days." For us, home isn’t just an address where we raise our families. It’s the world we inhabit, and it’s our only one. As the late Carl Sagan noted in his book Pale Blue Dot, “On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives." So it’s up to us to take care of Earth, for all the generations to come. In honor of Earth Day, we want to help more people save energy with a Nest Thermostat. Reversing decades of global warming is a huge challenge. But we believe that together, we can change climate change. Customers also interested in Google Home have a chance to save a little more as well, as Nest also announced a combo deal where purchasing both the Nest Learning Thermostat and Google Home at the same time will earn users $50 in savings. Instead of paying $378 for

Nest Reportedly Working on Cheaper 'Learning Thermostat' to Sell for Under $200

Nest is in the process of making a cheaper edition of its Nest Learning Thermostat as well as a new line of home security products, according to someone familiar with the company's plans speaking with Bloomberg. Nest is said to be "seeking a bigger share of the connected home market" in its move to make a cheaper version of its flagship thermostat device. The cheaper Nest Learning Thermostat would sell for under $200, while the current edition of the device is priced at $249 on the Nest Store. The cheaper model is believed to keep the same temperature learning functionality of the thermostat, but be manufactured with less expensive components and potentially do away with the current version's metal edges. Nest is also said to be developing sensors that will act as expansions to existing thermostat systems, and allow users to control the temperature of specific rooms instead of just the entire home. The cheaper thermostat is predicted to launch by next year. The company is working on a version of its "learning thermostat," which adjusts the temperature based on usage patterns, that would sell for under $200, the person said. The current version sells for $249. The cheaper model would include less expensive components and at least one internal prototype lacks the flagship model's metal edges, the person said. A home-security alarm system, a digital doorbell and an updated indoor security camera are also in the works, representing potential good news for a company that has struggled to release many new products. An all-new home security alarm system, digital

Nest Adds Two-Step Authentication to Increase Security for Nest Cams and Thermostats

Smart home accessory company Nest today announced the addition of two-step authentication into its mobile apps for iOS and Android devices, which will act as an extra layer of security that prevents intrusions into a user's Nest account. The company said that these extra security measures can help prevent malicious access to private information, particularly camera feeds of Nest Cam products. To activate two-step authentication, users can find a toggle menu in the Account Security settings of the official Nest app. After "2-step verification" is toggled on, users will have to sign in again by typing in a traditional email and password. Two-step authentication makes the process more secure by then texting a verification code to an approved device, which Nest owners will then have to enter into the app to gain access to their Nest products. We all know data security is a moving target. Technology keeps advancing, but so do the people who want to break into your email, your credit card or any other account they can get their hands on. But your home is your safe haven, where private information should stay private. So today we’re adding a new layer of security with the introduction of two-factor authentication. You may have seen or used two-factor authentication before, probably to get into your email or bank account. It’s simple but very effective – even if someone figures out your password, they still need to actually get their hands on your phone to get into your account. It takes a minute or two for our customers, but for hackers working from computers all

Nest App Gains Automatic Door Detection and Better Notifications With Animated Previews

An update to the Nest app is rolling out today, bringing with it a new feature that lets Nest Cam Indoor and Nest Cam Outdoor automatically detect doors within their field of view, further allowing users to set these thresholds as "Activity Zones" with warning-based notifications attached to them. The feature will be available only to those who have the company's $10/month subscription service Nest Aware. Specified Activity Zones have been part of Nest for years, but required users to manually draw the areas that they wanted a Nest Camera to detect. With the door detection, Nest will intelligently find and mark a new door-based Activity Zone and then notify the owner, who can then choose to keep or get rid of the zone. Nest said that the new door detection abilities have been made possible thanks to the company's deep learning algorithms that have recognized patterns over time. Nest Protect owners will also receive improved alerts -- with a connected Nest Cam, owners will get live video notifications when smoke or dangerous levels of carbon monoxide are detected. The company said the update is "another way Nest products work better together." An example of Nest's new automatic door detection feature Another part of the update, also exclusive to Nest Aware subscribers, is the introduction of rich notifications on iOS 10, letting Nest Cam owners glimpse an animated preview of the camera's video clip whenever action happens in the Activity Zone of a door. Android owners are also getting preview notifications, as well as a way to add shortcuts to favorite Nest

Dropcam Co-Founder Greg Duffy Joins Apple

Greg Duffy, the founder and former CEO of security camera company Dropcam, has accepted a role at Apple and will be leaving Google, reports The Information. An Apple spokesperson confirmed that Duffy has been hired by Apple, but didn't share details on his role at the company. The Information speculates that he could be leading a special project at Apple, given his background. Duffy who co-founded Dropcam in 2009, led the company until it was acquired by Google-owned Nest for $555 million in mid-2014. Duffy spent several months working for Nest before departing the company in January of 2015 amid rumors of a culture clash between Nest and Dropcam. Duffy was reportedly unhappy with the way Nest founder Tony Fadell ran the Alphabet-owned subsidiary, going as far as referring to him as a "tyrant bureaucrat." At any given time, Apple has multiple "special projects" going on behind the scenes, so it's difficult to speculate on what Duffy could be working on at the company. Apple is rumored to have a range of exploratory products in the works, including the Apple Car, an Amazon Echo-style home hub, an AR product, and

Robotics and Machine Learning Expert Yoky Matsuoka Returning to Nest After Leaving Apple

Last May, Apple hired Nest's former Vice President of Technology, Yoky Matsuoka, to help run the company's health initiatives, but she ended up leaving Apple towards the end of 2016. Matsuoka is now joining the Nest team once again as the Alphabet-owed company has re-hired the robotics expert as the Chief Technology Officer for the Nest Learning Thermostat (via Bloomberg). In her new role, she will "define a long-term technology roadmap" for the smart home accessory company, using her expertise in machine learning. Matsuoka is also said to be encouraged by Alphabet to identify other companies under the corporate umbrella where Nest might be able to form a beneficial partnership through collaborations "on technology and product development." Alphabet Inc. re-hired Yoky Matsuoka to oversee technology at its Nest Labs Inc. smart home unit, snapping up the robotics and artificial intelligence expert after she recently left Apple Inc. As Chief Technology Officer, Matsuoka will work closely with Nest's engineering and product teams to define a long-term technology roadmap. She'll be responsible for identifying important enabling technologies for Nest products and services, such as sensors and machine learning, while partnering with outside companies. During her time at Apple, Matsuoka worked under the company's chief operating officer Jeff Williams, who is in charge of Apple's health initiatives like ResearchKit, HealthKit, and CareKit. Originally at Nest, Matsuoka developed the technology that lets the Nest Learning Thermostat adapt to environmental conditions and

Nest Smart Home Products Coming to Four More European Countries

Smart home brand Nest has announced it is making its products available in four more countries across Europe, with Spain, Italy, Germany, and Austria being added to its official retail roster. From February 15, customers in the above regions will now be able to buy the Nest 3.0 learning thermostat (249 euros), the Protect smoke alarm (119 euros), and the company's indoor and outdoor cameras (199 euros). Nest products can be pre-ordered now from Amazon, local retailers, and select energy suppliers. Now that we're in four more countries, twice as many European homes have the chance to become Nest homes. We also plan to make our products available through even more energy, insurance and telco partners, as well as enlist the help of thousands of Nest Pro installers. So getting and installing Nest products, and connecting them to Works with Nest products, will be simple.The latest market expansion will be a boost to Nest. The company's products are used in homes in over 190 countries, but were previously only officially sold and supported in seven. The last market rollout occurred in September 2014. Nest says it will continue to expand into more countries as demand continues to

Nest Debuts New Colors for Smart Thermostat, Launches Nest Cam Outdoor in U.S.

Smart thermostat company Nest today announced three new colors for its flagship product, the Nest Learning Thermostat, now coming in white, black, and copper, in addition to the traditional stainless steel variant. The new colors are said to be available for a limited time only, but Nest didn't specify for how long they'd continue to go on sale. The purpose of introducing more colors and finishes was to help Nest "fit into every home." Additionally, Nest revealed that the Nest Cam Outdoor is now available for $199 for customers to purchase in the United States, with an expected launch date sometime in October for those in Europe. The company is bolstering all of its camera products -- Nest Outdoor Cam, Nest Indoor Cam, and the company-owned Dropcam -- with a new software feature called "Sightline," coming to the Nest app. Sightline is a new app feature that shows you what Nest Cam has seen and lets you speed through days of recorded video in seconds. It pulls out key moments automatically so you don’t waste time digging through footage. Looking for the moment someone opened the gate two days ago? No problem. Person alerts are also changing the game. If you have Nest Aware, Nest Cam can now tell if the activity it’s seeing is a tree swaying or someone coming in your house. So if it sees a person, you get a special alert. Nest Cam can even tell you if it’s sure it’s a person, or just suspects it is. With Sightline, Nest users will be able to quickly scrub through large amounts of footage in seconds, and the app is even able to decipher and showcase "key moments" in

Nest Update Lets Users Control Smart Thermostat From Their Apple Watch

Hinted at by the company earlier in the month, Nest recently debuted a minor, but notable, update for its iOS app, introducing a few user interface tweaks and ways to share live videos from the company's indoor and outdoor cameras. For those users with a Nest Thermostat and an Apple Watch, the 5.6.0 update should be of particular interest, since it brings with it the ability to let you adjust the temperature of your home, right from your wrist, without needing to open the iOS app (via The Verge). Additionally, there's a new "Spaces" grouping feature that provides an organized way to place Nest products by which room of the house they're in, and lets users view all of their live camera feeds at once, if on Wi-Fi. Additional viewers can be added into these live streams now, as well, thanks to a new web-based site, video.nest.com (which doesn't appear to be up-and-running at the time of writing), where a password can be shared to a trusted third party who might need to check in on the cameras. Image via The Verge Nest detailed the full list of updates in the App Store: We have several new features for you. 
- Spaces groups your Nest products by room and lets you see all your cameras at once. And if you’re connected to Wi-Fi, shows you all of their live views.
 - Share a password protected live view of your camera. Now grandma can see what the kids are up to at video.nest.com.
 - 1080p support for Dropcam Pro.
 - Automatic video quality adjustment helps make sure you get a continuous, clear picture.
 - We’ve also added support for Apple Watch. You

Nest Releases Outdoor Security Camera, Mobile App Update in the Works

Google-owned Nest has unveiled Nest Cam Outdoor, its first new product since co-founder Tony Fadell left the company. The outdoor home security camera is similar to last year's Nest Cam – now called the Nest Cam Indoor. The wired outdoor Cam captures 1080p HD video and features a two-way mic, 20-foot infrared night vision, and a 130-degree wide-angle viewing lens. In addition, the Nest Cam Outdoor features waterproofing and a more rounded design, while a magnetized disc on the rear of the camera fixes it to external surfaces, such as house guttering. Both cameras carry the same price tag of $199 and work with the Nest mobile app, which the company says will receive a redesign later this month. The app offers encrypted video streaming as well as additional $10-per-month, subscription-based video features, including upcoming features like wide-angle camera views and human profile detection. The camera doesn't work with Apple's HomeKit, but Nest says it will work with Google Home, despite the camera running on its own proprietary platform. The new camera signals Nest's ongoing commitment to developing smart home products on its own, despite being acquired by Google in 2014 and its co-founder and former CEO leaving the company last month. Speculation regarding Fadell's departure revolved around recent issues at Nest, including a long length of time between product releases and software issues with the Nest Protect smoke detector that led to a recall. Tony Fadell is credited as one of the original creators of the iPod, heading up the project as senior

Nest Co-Founder Tony Fadell Leaving the Company

Tony Fadell, widely known as the "father" of the iPod and the creator of the Nest Learning Thermostat, today announced he is leaving Nest and Nest parent company Alphabet. Fadell, Nest's founder, has been with Google since it acquired Nest for $3.2 billion in 2014 and has worked on projects like Google Glass in addition to continuing to run Nest Labs. In a blog post, Fadell says he has decided the time is right to "leave the Nest," a decision that was originally made late last year. Fadell will not be present for day to day activities at Nest, but he plans to remain involved with the company as an advisor to Alphabet and Larry Page.While there is never a perfect time to transition, we've grown Nest to much more than a thermostat company. We've created a hardware + software + services ecosystem, which is still in the early growth stage and will continue to evolve to move further into the mainstream over the coming years. The future of Nest is equally as bright given the strong and experienced leadership team in place, as well as the two-year product roadmap we've developed together to ensure the right future direction. [...] I will miss this company and my Nest family (although I'll be around to provide advice and guidance and help the team with the transition), but I am excited about what's coming next, both for Nest and for me.Fadell says his new role as advisor will provide him with "time and flexibility" to pursue new opportunities and "create and disrupt other industries." He's leaving Nest with a two-year roadmap in place and Marwan Fawaz, a former Motorola

Apple Ceases Selling Nest Products Online and In Stores

Apple has stopped selling the Nest Learning Thermostat and the Nest Smoke Alarm in its stores and has confirmed to Mashable that it will no longer be carrying Nest products. The Nest thermostat was still available online earlier this month, but a search for the Nest thermostat or smoke alarm now redirects customers to other HomeKit products. Apple's decision to stop offering Google's Nest products in its retail stores and online comes just over a month after the first HomeKit-compatible products became available for purchase. In early June, Lutron, iHome, Elgato, Ecobee, and Insteon began offering a range of smart lights, plugs, thermostats, room monitors, and more, all of which work with HomeKit. The HomeKit-compatible Ecobee3 smart thermostat is a direct competitor of the Nest, so it's no surprise Apple has opted to stop offering Google's products in order to highlight accessories that are compatible with its own smart home platform. This isn't the first time Apple has stopped offering products that directly compete with its own product offerings. Last year, the company stopped selling Fitbit activity tracking devices ahead of the launch of the Apple Watch and also culled several other activity trackers from its store earlier this year. Apple's decision to stop selling the Nest thermostat comes as the company is working to revamp accessory lineups in its retail stores, cutting back on the number of accessories offered and packaging many of them in boxes that match its own design aesthetic.