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'MoviePass' Articles

MoviePass Now Limiting Subscribers to a Choice of Six Movies Each Day

MoviePass today announced new restrictions for its ever-changing movie service, with the company now limiting its subscribers to a choice of what appears to be six to seven movies per day. On the MoviePass site, MoviePass lists "This Week's Movies," a section described as a "full lineup of movie titles available on MoviePass in the coming days." For this Friday, that includes Mile 22, Christopher Robin, The Miseducation of Cameron Post, We The Animals, Skate Kitchen, Juliet Naked, and Summer of 84. Noticeably missing is Crazy Rich Asians, which won't be available until Sunday, and some of the movies seem to be limited distribution films not available in all areas. We want to share more details about our service moving forward as part of our commitment to keep you fully informed. Here’s a full lineup of movie titles available on MoviePass in the coming days: https://t.co/BE9St1gDfF pic.twitter.com/OFCR56fcGd— MoviePass (@MoviePass) August 16, 2018 Several popular movies that have already been released are not included for Friday, such as Mission: Impossible - Fallout, Mamma Mia, and Ant-Man. MoviePass in early August restructured its subscription model to allow customers to see three movies per month for the $9.95 monthly fee. Prior to that, MoviePass had announced that it would raise its base subscription price to $14.95 per month, and before that, it introduced peak pricing and restricted major film releases, all in an attempt to stop hemorrhaging money. For now, MoviePass seems to have settled on the $9.95 per month plan for three movies a month,

MoviePass Reveals $9.95/Month Plan for 3 Films, Ditching Peak Pricing and No Longer Limiting Major Movies

MoviePass is restructuring its subscription model once again, today announcing that it will not be raising prices for its subscribers and instead return to its traditional $9.95/month price tag while limiting how often users can go to the movies every month. Effective August 15, subscribers will transition to the new model upon their renewal and from then on be able to see three movies every month at $9.95. The move follows negative responses that the company received after it announced its intention to raise the base subscription price to $14.95/month just last week. These users will also gain access to up to a $5.00 discount on any additional movie tickets purchased after they see their three allotted movies in any given month. "We are now creating a framework to provide the vast majority of subscribers with what they want most – low cost, value, variety, and broad availability – and to bring some moderation to the small number of subscribers who imposed undue cost on the system by viewing a disproportionately large number of movies," said MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe. "We believe this new plan is a way for us to move forward with stability and continue to revitalize an entrenched industry and return moviegoing to everyone’s financial reach.” MoviePass has had a turbulent summer, beginning with the introduction of Peak Pricing in July, rolling out Ticket Verification to all users, and restricting major film releases from its subscribers for the first two weeks of release. In an interview with The Wall Street Journal today, MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe confirmed that all of

MoviePass Will Increase Price of Standard Plan to $14.95/Month in August

One day after MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe announced that subscribers will not be allowed to see select major movies like "Christopher Robin" and "The Meg," the company today announced a price hike for subscribers to its standard plan. The price of this $9.95/month tier will increase to $14.95/month "within the next 30 days," according to a press release shared today. This increase comes just under one year since MoviePass first began making headlines by dropping its subscription price to $9.95/month, allowing users to see one movie per day and saving money for those who visit the theater often. Now, following ongoing stock price drops, a new "Peak Pricing" feature, and a recent service blackout caused by a sudden lack of money, MoviePass is struggling to stay afloat. Today's press release also reiterates on the company's plan to limit availability of "First Run Movies" that open on 1,000+ screens (which is typically any major studio release) during their first two weeks, "unless made available on a promotional basis." This refers to films that MoviePass partly owns under its subsidiary MoviePass Ventures, gaining revenue through box office ticket sales on movies like "American Animals" and "Gotti." According to the company, its goal is to "enhance discovery" and "drive attendance" to smaller independent films like these, and as such has decided to limit ticket availability for "blockbuster" films. MoviePass also admits that it will save money by restricting its subscribers from being able to see movies like "Mission: Impossible Fallout" and "The Meg." In an effort

MoviePass CEO Says Subscribers Will Be Restricted From Seeing Upcoming Major Movies

Business is not going smoothly for movie subscription service MoviePass, which is supposed to allow customers to watch one movie in theaters per a day for a $9.95 per month subscription pass. Amid funding issues and a deep drop in stock prices, MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe today held an all-hands meeting where he told employees that customers will be restricted from seeing major movie releases that include "Christopher Robin" and "The Meg." MoviePass' Peak Pricing The information comes courtesy of an employee who shared the news with Business Insider, and it comes just after MoviePass prevented many of its subscribers from seeing "Mission Impossible: Fallout," the major movie release last weekend. In addition to informing employees that subscribers will not be able to see "Christopher Robin" and "The Meg," on opening weekend Business Insider says that Lowe also "implied that the practice of not offering tickets to major movies would continue for the foreseeable future." Lowe's announcement echoed a statement MoviePass released over the weekend suggesting that "certain movies may not always be available in every theater on our platform." "Christopher Robin" is set to be released this weekend, while "The Meg" comes out on August 10. MoviePass has been forced to restrict access to popular movies due to financing issues, with reports indicating the service was down last week after parent company Helios & Matheson ran out of money, only restoring the service after securing a loan for millions. To prevent another shutdown, customers in many markets were not

MoviePass Now Charging Extra Fees for Popular Showtimes

MoviePass in June said that it would introduce surge pricing for moviegoers watching movies at peak times, and as of today, those new surcharges have gone into effect. In an email sent out to customers and a new section on its website, MoviePass explains that its new "Peak Pricing" system may require subscribers to "pay a small additional fee depending on level of demand" for a movie. MoviePass claims that peak pricing provides "additional flexibility" for MoviePass and its users around popular movies and times for which there is limited inventory. The service says that to avoid fees, subscribers should choose an alternative date or film, with one fee waiver per subscriber available each month. MoviePass has provided little detail on the new fee system. Peak pricing fees are determined "based on movie demand and popularity" with movies that are in demand for "title, date, or time of day" impacted. Specific surcharge fees have not been outlined by MoviePass, but a screenshot of the peak pricing feature shared by MoviePass displays a $3.43 fee for seeing "Avengers: Infinity War." Extra fees will be charged to the credit card on file with MoviePass. Peak pricing will be rolling out for all MoviePass users "in the coming weeks" for all theaters, with MoviePass planning to provide details on which films will be subjected to peak pricing and how much they will cost in the MoviePass app. Movies affected by peak pricing will feature a red lightning icon when prices have gone up, and a gray lightning icon when prices will soon surge. MoviePass subscribers who

MoviePass Will Introduce Surge Pricing for Popular Films Beginning in a Few Weeks

Movie subscription service MoviePass today confirmed that it will soon introduce surge pricing into its business model, charging customers from $2 and up for films that the company deems popular. The news comes from MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe, who confirmed to Business Insider that surge pricing will affect monthly subscribers while annual subscribers will be exempt from what he describes as "high-demand" pricing. The change will appear for affected subscribers within the "coming weeks," according to Lowe. Surge pricing is a dynamic, time-based strategy that apps like Uber use when a large amount of customers are requesting rides in the app but there aren't enough drivers to taxi them around. Now this will extend to MoviePass, so on opening weekends or at particularly busy late-night showings of popular movies, monthly subscribers should expect to pay a bit more above their locked-in $9.95/month subscription price. Because this is not a fee that the movie theater is charging, users can expect MoviePass to take the surge pricing fee from the credit cards associated with their account -- although Lowe or any MoviePass spokesperson has yet to confirm this. "At certain times for certain films — on opening weekend — there could be an additional charge for films," Lowe told Business Insider. Lowe said this decision was a way to have its theaters partners see more traffic for big blockbusters in the mid-week and less-crowded weekends following the movie's opening weekend. It was also to "make sure that we can continue to offer a valuable service and support the

AMC Launches 'Stubs A-List' MoviePass Competitor for $19.99 Per Month, Launching June 26

AMC today announced the upcoming launch of a new movie-watching service that's designed to compete with MoviePass, allowing AMC customers to watch several movies per week for a monthly fee. While MoviePass permits customers to watch one movie per day for $9.95 per month, there have been questions about its long-term sustainability. AMC's "Stubs A-List" offering will let customers watch three movies per week for $19.95 plus tax, which it claims is a "sustainable price." MoviePass does not permit customers to watch more than one movie per day or to rewatch movies they've already seen once, both features that are included in the Stubs A-List program. Stubs A-List can be used at all AMC, AMC Dine-in, and AMC Classic theatres in the United States, with other perks that are not available through MoviePass. Customers can book tickets online in advance, including at AMC Theatres with reserved seating, and it includes IMAX, Dolby Cinema, RealD 3D, Prime, and Big D movies. Movie tickets can be purchased at AMC Theatres, on the AMC website, or through the AMC Theatres app, available for iOS and Android. AMC's new offering also includes all of the benefits of its AMC Stubs Premiere program, with "VIP service levels" at theatres, no online ticketing fees, and discounts on food and beverages, such as free upgrades on popcorn and soda. Stubs A-List will be available starting on Tuesday, June

MoviePass CEO Admits He Was 'Completely Inaccurate', iOS App 'Has Never Tracked' Users in Background

Last week, movie subscription service MoviePass received negative press when CEO Mitch Lowe mentioned that the company watches "how you drive from home to the movies" and notices "where you go afterwards" using location tracking in the background on iOS. This week, through customer support emails and in an interview with Variety, MoviePass and Lowe are apologizing over this "mischaracterization" of how the service locates its members and are trying to clear things up once and for all. In a letter that began hitting subscriber inboxes yesterday, Lowe admitted the need to "eliminate any misconceptions" that MoviePass is collecting location related data when it shouldn't be. He explained that the MoviePass app uses "standard" location services capabilities on an opt-in basis, and specified that there are only two events that would prompt MoviePass to identify your location: when you perform a search for nearby theaters and when you check into a theater. Otherwise, Lowe stated that Moviepass does not follow you before or after you watch a movie, or at any time that the app is not open. MoviePass does not track and has never tracked or collected data on the location of our members at any point when the app is not active. Last week, following Lowe's comments, the company removed the background tracking capabilities from the iOS app. In the letter, the CEO said that MoviePass "does not use and has never used this feature." Lowe echoed these sentiments in an interview with Variety, explaining that prior to the update, MoviePass used Apple's three standard privacy

MoviePass App Tracks Your Location Before and After Movies [Updated With Statement]

MoviePass, the app that allows you to watch a movie in theaters each day for the low price of $10 per month, is unsurprisingly planning to use your location data to make money. As TechCrunch points out, MoviePass CEO Mitch Lowe recently told an audience at a Hollywood event that MoviePass is collecting and monetizing through location information. "We get an enormous amount of information. We watch how you drive from home to the movies. We watch where you go afterwards," said Lowe. MoviePass, which is owned by a data analytics firm, has made no secret of the fact that it plans to use data generated from subscribers to make money. "There are dozens and dozens of businesses like ours that invest in building a large subscriber base," Lowe told Recode in early February. "Netflix buys $8 billion of content a year, and believe me, they have to borrow the money to do it. Or companies like Facebook -- it's free, but they're monetizing all the advertising and all the data about you. That's exactly what we are [doing]." While MoviePass has been transparent about how it plans to make money, most people are likely not aware of the extent of the data the company collects. As TechCrunch says, it's likely users assumed MoviePass would collect data like ticket sales, movie choice, promotions, and more, rather than detailed location data that tracks your movement before and after seeing a film. MoviePass's privacy policy says that the app requires access to location when selecting a theater, and that it makes a single request for location coordinates. There's no mention of

MoviePass Founders Say Subscription Service 'Would Never Have Happened' Without iPhones in New App Store Feature

Apple today on the iOS App Store shared a new interview with the founders of MoviePass, touching on the service's origins and its integral ties to the iPhone and modern smartphone app development. MoviePass debuted in 2011, but grew in popularity last August when the company dropped its subscription price to $9.95/month, which lets customers see one standard 2D film every day in the theater In Apple's new interview with Stacy Spikes and Hamet Watt -- the pair of entrepreneurs who founded MoviePass seven years ago -- the conversation eventually focuses on where the idea for MoviePass emerged. According to Spikes, the kernel of the idea that would become MoviePass originated from art-house theaters in New York City that let customers see unlimited movies for a flat donation fee. He tried to install a similar model for his own Urbanworld Film Festival in the late 1990s, but admitted it was "too early," and that iPhones, apps, and the advances in development that emerged from this technology were all needed to address the technical roadblocks of such a service. "The idea was almost too early," says Spikes. "We didn't have iPhones and apps to figure out payment and interfacing. If it weren't for that development, MoviePass would never have happened." MoviePass works through the use of both the iPhone app and a paired debit card that is sent to subscribers through the mail after they sign up. If you want to see a movie, you travel to your local theater (MoviePass is supported at over 90 percent of theaters nationwide), select a 2D showtime, "check in," and at that time