Apple's Limits on Third-Party 'Find My' Integration Under Scrutiny

Apple last month introduced the new "Find My" Network Accessory Program, built to allow third-party products to work with Apple's own ‌Find My‌ app. While Apple's AirTags have yet to be formally announced, this program was seen as a way for Apple to level the playing field with competing Bluetooth location trackers, like Tile, and avoid accusations of Apple monopolizing the market.

FindMyTileFeature
In a new report today by The Washington Post, there are more aspects to this program that haven't been previously detailed, including far stricter rules for third-party companies using the ‌Find My‌ app. According to an anonymous developer who shared a secret 50-page PDF from Apple about ‌Find My‌, customers who use Apple's app to locate a device will be barred from using third-party services simultaneously.

Although the details remain sparse, this suggests that while you will be able to link a Tile tracker to ‌Find My‌ and use Apple's app to locate a lost wallet, for example, you would then be prevented from using Tile's own app to do the same. Additionally, because of Apple's restrictions to "always allow" location access, every outside company will have to ask each Apple user for permission to obtain their location, which is a notable hindrance for item location apps.

Another issue pointed out by developers is their limited access to the iPhone's Bluetooth antenna and other Apple hardware. While the ‌Find My‌ app can use these pieces of hardware whenever it needs to, third-party software can only use the Bluetooth antenna within certain thresholds, and if the developers go beyond that Apple cuts their access off and prevents the software from working. Notably, according to these developers, Apple does not inform them what the specific threshold is.

Following the announcement of Apple's ‌Find My‌ app and amid the rumors swirling of Apple's own Bluetooth tracking hardware, Tile began taking action against Apple. The company accused Apple of abuse of power and of illegally favoring its own products in a letter sent to the European Union in May. Tile said that Apple was making it more difficult for users to operate the Tile Bluetooth trackers on iOS devices, "by selectively disabling features that allow for seamless user experience."

Despite the claims made by developers in The Washington Post today, Apple spokesman Alex Kirschner said that the company sees its Find My Network Accessory Program as helpful to smaller companies that lack resources to build a location-finding service: "If you were a smaller player interested in getting into the finding space and you haven’t built a finding network, this allows you to do that." Apple has denied that its policies are anticompetitive.

Top Rated Comments

macsplusmacs Avatar
49 months ago
Exactly. the last thing we need is an Android type of system that ends up watching and following us beyond the permissions we give it.


" According to an [S]anonymous developer [/S]who shared a secret 50-page PDF from Apple "

The whiny CEO of Tile.
Score: 24 Votes (Like | Disagree)
jameswilby Avatar
49 months ago
Location data is extremely sensitive. I don’t know enough about this situation right now to say which side I’m on... but I think I would certainly be worried if Apple wasn’t been strict as a whole.
Score: 23 Votes (Like | Disagree)
MauiPa Avatar
49 months ago
Tile should be forced to write an app that allows any company's devices to be found using it. That would level the playing field, exactly what tile wants. Brilliant!
Score: 14 Votes (Like | Disagree)
springsup Avatar
49 months ago
lol this is shrewd from Apple. I don’t think they expect anybody to actually join this program: the item-finding market isn’t some massive, booming phenomenon, so their proposed program targeted at startups is just an insult to emphasise that it really isn’t a separate market at all from their perspective.


While the Find My app can use these pieces of hardware whenever it needs to, third-party software can only use the Bluetooth antenna within certain thresholds, and if the developers go beyond that Apple cuts their access off and prevents the software from working. Notably, according to these developers, Apple does not inform them what the specific threshold is.
This is why Tile can’t make their own app which does what Apple’s can. Read the article before claiming they’re greedy or demanding anything special from Apple. In theory what they’re asking for is perfectly reasonable - the ability to write a similarly-good App of their own on Apple’s OS.

It’s like nobody here remembers Microsoft trying to lock people in to Internet Explorer by tying it deeply in to Windows. That was a move that ended up hurting the entire internet because IE was so crap, and hurt Apple especially because Macs didn’t have IE so websites didn’t work properly or looked bad (they eventually got it as part of the Microsoft deal IIRC). Or remember when the cellular operators in the US were blocking mobile payment systems because they were demanding we all use their payment service?

it’s a similar thing here. Apple is a hardware and operating system developer who is using that position to grant their own products superpowers that no other product can match. It crushes competition and is totally crappy for consumers.
Score: 14 Votes (Like | Disagree)
boltarus Avatar
49 months ago
The Feds are not going to be happy until they have forced Apple to make their platform so open to privacy thieves and scamware that government tracking and snooping will be trivial and unnoticed.
Score: 9 Votes (Like | Disagree)
bollman Avatar
49 months ago
Since everyone here is absolutely convinced the only company that can do it "right" is Apple, why the need for any third parties on the App Store? Just lock it to all the glorious offerings Apples provides, 100% safe!
No way they could come under any scrutiny if they are the only ones on the App Store.
There's an (Apple) App for that!
Score: 8 Votes (Like | Disagree)

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