Apple Releases macOS Catalina Supplemental Update With Fixes for Installation, iCloud Login, and Game Center Bugs

Alongside iOS 13.1.3, Apple today also released a supplemental update for macOS Catalina, addressing several bugs from the initial public release version, including a problem with Setup Assistant hanging during Catalina installation.


The ‌macOS Catalina‌ Supplemental Update includes installation and reliability improvements, and is recommended for all users.

This update:
- Improves installation reliability of ‌macOS Catalina‌ on Macs with low disk space
- Fixes an issue that prevented Setup Assistant from completing during some installations
- Resolves an issue that prevents accepting iCloud Terms and Conditions when multiple ‌iCloud‌ accounts are logged in
- Improves the reliability of saving Game Center data when playing Apple Arcade games offline
Today's supplemental update comes ahead of macOS 10.15.1, which was seeded as an initial developer beta last Friday.

Related Roundup: macOS Catalina

Top Rated Comments

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5 weeks ago
Not touching this beast until at least 10.15.2
Rating: 37 Votes
5 weeks ago
985.4MB update to fix icloud and installation issues. I've been using Catalina and really regret, Mojave was way more stable. Sidecar doesn't work (timeout!), iCloud is buggier than ever and now my computer even awakes randomly (powernap is off!). Worst update in years.
Rating: 30 Votes
5 weeks ago
Yeah, I’m still going to wait until early next year to update to Catalina.
Rating: 26 Votes
5 weeks ago
Wish they would call it macOS 13.0.1 and dispense with unversioned "supplemental updates".
Rating: 21 Votes
5 weeks ago
No thank you Apple...
Rating: 19 Votes
5 weeks ago


I recommend Catalina. Seriously. You gotta do your own research though if you still need to use 32-bit apps or if you're a DJ and need to adapt something or something about your workflow with the iTunes library (? I'm not a DJ), other than that I'm finding that the posts here make the problems seem blown way out of proportion. If you read closely there is little substance, a lot of knee jerk reactions to unsubstantiated claims. If you do upgrade, my prediction is one day you'll install 10.15.1 that will fix bugs you never knew existed in 10.15.0. I see the same whining every release, whether it's macOS or iOS. Sure there are bugs. Sure there seems to be more whining this time. It's a new feature release. New feature releases tend to have more visible bugs than 'under the hood' performance/stability releases. Sure some people will be affected. But 99% of people will never actually experience a bug that has any affect on getting work done. I stand by that statistic even though I pulled it out of my ear. Unless you don't care about the new features and are satisfied with Mojave (and still don't feel confident about Catalina), I'd say do the research, then go for it.


seriously, just get real for a moment, Mojave didn’t have near this much complaints after launch.


Apple OFFICIALLY recommends Mac Mini users TO NOT upgrade to Catalina yet. When was the last time Apple said “please, it’s best to avoid our newest OS until we fix it”?

It is awesome that you don’t have any issues, but just because you do not have any issues, do not accuse many people out there that they are lying or over exaggerating things.
Rating: 12 Votes
5 weeks ago
It's iOS 11 all over again... What's going on at Apple?
Rating: 12 Votes
5 weeks ago


I guess I'm stuck with Mojave for a while. Did I misread the warnings about my CS5 Illustrator and Catalina?? I could swear that these pop-up warnings only said that CS5 apps 32 bit, would simply not perform as well in the new 64 bit OS. Nothing indicated I was at a dead end. Did I completely miss it?
Now I'm stuck with the old OS and possibly miss out on security updates. I use Illustrator a lot-- Photoshop completely stopped working two years ago. I certainly don't use over $250/year's worth of Adobe apps. And because I don't use it at the more CPU intensive huge file levels, I thought a little slower, I can live with that.
It's a huge disappointment.
I've got a general beef with Adobe, I used PhotoShop from 1992 until about 2017, and Illustrator from 1995 to current. After about 2000 most of the 'new features' ceased being useful to me, and after 2005 they were very stable (until about 2015-17). And what has bugged me since the late 90s is that annoyances in both applications have never been addressed. The handles on vector lines in Illustrator just get smaller and smaller with every screen resolution improvement. (Corel Draw solved this 20 years ago!)
I've also noticed that because I have to use the DNG converter before I can bring my newer Nikon's images into LightRoom, I lose all the date and time metadata. Duh.
I'm sure I'm missing some simple fixes to my hassles, but not all. (I'm a crank, but not completely.) One would think that our incredibly powerful Macs (mine is a 2017 MBP) should be able to easily run major legacy software. Did Apple and Adobe kiss and make-up? Did Adobe cut Apple in on the monthly vig? Rant over.



It’s got nothing to do with “monthly vigs” paid by Adobe to Apple. Adobe, and many larger developers, were patently negligent when it came to coding for 64bit apps on the Mac. They had over a decade to compile for 64 bit, and move away from Carbon, and decided to do nothing.

For the record, here’s the timeline for 64bit support on Mac OS X / macOS: (Taken from Ars Technica’s excellent macOS review)


* June 2003: The PowerPC G5 CPU is the first 64-bit-capable chip to show up in a Mac ('https://www.macworld.com/article/1025078/future.html'), and with Mac OS X 10.3 Panther, it can theoretically address up to 8GB of RAM.
* April 2005: Mac OS X 10.4 Tiger allows for 64-bit processes under the hood ('https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2005/04/macosx-10-4/4/')—they can be spun off from another process or run via the Terminal.
* June 2005: Apple announces that it will begin using Intel processors ('https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2005/06/mac-20050607/'), which are still primarily 32-bit. Whoops!
* August 2006: Apple launches the Intel Mac Pro with a 64-bit Woodcrest CPU; mainstream 64-bit Core 2 Duo Macs follow shortly afterward.
* October 2007: Mac OS X 10.5 Leopard launches with actual support for regular 64-bit apps ('https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2007/10/mac-os-x-10-5/6/'); Universal Binaries can run on 32-bit and 64-bit Intel and PowerPC machines, covering four architectures within a single app. Unlike Windows, Apple never ships separate 32- and 64-bit versions of Mac OS X.
* August 2009: Mac OS X 10.6 Snow Leopard still runs on 32-bit chips, but for the first time everything from the apps to the OS kernel supports 64-bit operation ('https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2009/08/mac-os-x-10-6/5/'). Snow Leopard's 64-bit capabilities are a major component of Apple's marketing push, which infamously includes "no new features ('https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2009/08/mac-os-x-10-6/')." However, most systems still default to loading the 32-bit kernel.
* July 2011: Mac OS X 10.7 Lion drops support for 32-bit Intel CPUs (Snow Leopard had already ended all support for PowerPC systems). Older Macs continue to default to the 32-bit kernel and 32-bit drivers, but new Macs introduced in this era typically default to the 64-bit kernel.
* July 2012: OS X 10.8 Mountain Lion boots into the 64-bit kernel by default on all systems that support it, including a few that previously defaulted to the 32-bit kernel. In the process, a few 64-bit systems with 32-bit graphics drivers and 32-bit EFIs are dropped from the support list.
* June 2017: Apple announces macOS 10.13 High Sierra and says it's the last release that will run 32-bit apps "without compromise ('https://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2017/09/macos-10-13-high-sierra-the-ars-technica-review/3/#h1')."
* January 2018: All new apps submitted to the Mac App Store need to be 64-bit only.
* April 2018: High Sierra's 10.13.4 update begins warning users ('https://support.apple.com/en-us/HT208436') about "not optimized" (read: 32-bit) apps the first time they're launched.
* June 2018: All new apps and updates to existing apps submitted to the Mac App Store need to be 64-bit only. Apple announces macOS Mojave, which will be the last version of the OS to run 32-bit code.
* September 2018: Apple releases Mojave. 32-bit software continues to run but with more frequent and aggressive nag messages than High Sierra.
* June 2019: Apple announces macOS Catalina, which makes good on Apple's promise to drop 32-bit software support.
* October 2019: Catalina is released. 32-bit apps no longer run on the latest version of macOS.



Mojave will continue to receive OS security updates until the release of macOS 10.17, three years from now. Plenty of time to consider migrating to other options, or investing in an older Mac to continue to run your legacy software (which is what I have elected to do, see my sig below).
Rating: 11 Votes
5 weeks ago


985.4MB update to fix icloud and installation issues. I've been using Catalina and really regret, Mojave was way more stable. Sidecar doesn't work (timeout!), iCloud is buggier than ever and now my computer even awakes randomly (powernap is off!). Worst update in years.

zero issues. best update for years.
Rating: 9 Votes
5 weeks ago


I guess I'm stuck with Mojave for a while. Did I misread the warnings about my CS5 Illustrator and Catalina?? I could swear that these pop-up warnings only said that CS5 apps 32 bit, would simply not perform as well in the new 64 bit OS. Nothing indicated I was at a dead end. Did I completely miss it?
Now I'm stuck with the old OS and possibly miss out on security updates. I use Illustrator a lot-- Photoshop completely stopped working two years ago. I certainly don't use over $250/year's worth of Adobe apps. And because I don't use it at the more CPU intensive huge file levels, I thought a little slower, I can live with that.
It's a huge disappointment.
I've got a general beef with Adobe, I used PhotoShop from 1992 until about 2017, and Illustrator from 1995 to current. After about 2000 most of the 'new features' ceased being useful to me, and after 2005 they were very stable (until about 2015-17). And what has bugged me since the late 90s is that annoyances in both applications have never been addressed. The handles on vector lines in Illustrator just get smaller and smaller with every screen resolution improvement. (Corel Draw solved this 20 years ago!)
I've also noticed that because I have to use the DNG converter before I can bring my newer Nikon's images into LightRoom, I lose all the date and time metadata. Duh.
I'm sure I'm missing some simple fixes to my hassles, but not all. (I'm a crank, but not completely.) One would think that our incredibly powerful Macs (mine is a 2017 MBP) should be able to easily run major legacy software. Did Apple and Adobe kiss and make-up? Did Adobe cut Apple in on the monthly vig? Rant over.


You've had well past 16 months to realize 32 bit was going to be done in 10.15.
Rating: 8 Votes

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