iPhone 11 Lineup Supports Faster Wi-Fi 6, Which Launches Today

The non-profit Wi-Fi Alliance today announced the release of the Wi-Fi 6 certification program, noting that devices with the Wi-Fi 6 Certified logo will meet the "highest standards for security and interoperability."


Wi-Fi 6, aka 802.11ax, delivers faster speeds, greater network capacity, improved power efficiency, lower latency, and connectivity improvements in areas with several Wi-Fi devices. Wi-Fi 6 devices also must support WPA3, the latest version of the Wi-Fi security protocol with improved cryptographic strength.

The upcoming iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max all support Wi-Fi 6, and the devices will likely be certified under this program soon. More information is available on the Wi-Fi Alliance website. CNET also has a good explainer.

Related Roundups: iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro

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5 weeks ago
Now to wait for my Wi-Fi 6 AirPort Extreme.
Rating: 53 Votes
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5 weeks ago
It really sucks that Apple stopped making routers. Grrrrr
Rating: 14 Votes
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5 weeks ago

The upcoming iPhone 11, iPhone 11 Pro, and iPhone 11 Pro Max all support Wi-Fi 6, and the devices will likely be certified under this program soon.


The last iPhone that shows up in the certification database is the iPhone 5c, certified 6 years ago in 2013. Either Apple is not certifying their devices anymore, or they're intentionally holding them back from the database.

I thought WiFi 6 devices have been available for a year?


Draft 802.11ax devices were available. Wi-Fi is a trademark used to define a subset of 802.11 and related standards. The Wi-Fi Alliance, which controls the trademark didn't define the Wi-Fi 6 (based on a 802.11ax draft) until earlier this year, and didn't start certifying against their standard until today.

So I'm thinking I'll get a router switch to plug into my modem in my downstairs studio, run a line from that to a 2Gbps PowerLine adapter using link aggregation (I have a newer home with good electrical wiring),


Powerline marketing is a complete scam. The actual throughput of a "2 Gbps" power line adapter is something like 200 Mbps under the most ideal conditions.
Rating: 5 Votes
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5 weeks ago

It really sucks that Apple stopped making routers. Grrrrr


I know right? This would be an easy $150+ sell for me and pretty much everyone who's stuck on an N Airport Extreme or Time Capsule.

I'm going to be in the market for an upgrade soon; I want something with as few bells and whistles as possible that can just be a bridged access point.
Rating: 5 Votes
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5 weeks ago
imagine if Apple came out with a new AirPort mesh router system with WiFi 6 and its own separate backend signal as well as utilizing the U1 chip to enable some next gen beam forming data transfer. meme and porn will be instantaneous!
Rating: 5 Votes
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5 weeks ago

I can’t wait to get Facebook to load faster.


You’ll also need a WiFi 6 AX router to get into that ecosystem too
Rating: 4 Votes
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5 weeks ago
Wifi 6? Gotta say...this is good.
Rating: 3 Votes
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5 weeks ago

Curious what people are doing on their phones that they need such speed on WIFI? I mean, 9.6 Gbps? Seems silly...

It’s the typical e-p**** competition. Bragging rights for having a wifi that is 1 number higher than your neighbors/friends. And all the youtubers would be hyping it out as if it can magically make your internet faster. Cycle of capitalism and consumerism at its finest.
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Porn.

Faster WiFi != faster actual internet speed.
Unless you’re serving your own 4K porn right from your own internal network server for your house.
Rating: 3 Votes
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5 weeks ago
looking forward to upgrading my network, though im going to wait a bit to see a WiFi 6 router with HomeKit integration.
Rating: 3 Votes
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5 weeks ago

I thought WiFi 6 devices have been available for a year?

I'm in the market right now for a new home wireless network. I had to move my AirPort Extreme downstairs when I finished my studio last year so I could have ethernet straight into my iMac and Xbox One X. But many places upstairs now I only get 5-20% of my 500Mbps speed and some things like my HomeKit garage door opener fall offline from time to time. I also have Ring for my home alarm system and front and back cameras, and I've read that it doesn't play well with mesh WiFi.

So I'm thinking I'll get a router switch to plug into my modem in my downstairs studio, run a line from that to a 2Gbps PowerLine adapter using link aggregation (I have a newer home with good electrical wiring), and then run that to the other end of it's adapter upstairs centrally where I'll put a single (commercial grade?) WiFi 6 router. Then when my contract is up next summer I'll upgrade to 1Gbps home internet. If my internet speed ever goes over 2Gbps (certainly someday), then hopefully by then there will be a faster PowerLine adapter, or I might hire an electrician to fish a 10Gbps Cat 7 line through my walls (which shouldn't be too ridiculous given the layout of my house and the way I designed my studio).

Curious to hear what other people in a similar situation are planning to do?

Based on your description you don’t need Cat 7 unless you’re planning exceptionally long runs (>50 meters) or distributing a large number of terminal devices. Cat 6a will carry power, the bandwidth you want, and cost nearly half as much depending on your network & installer. Most networking installers I know, including two I work with, will tell you that Cat 7 is really commercial, not residential, even for high/bandwidth applications.

We’re about to install a 10/100/1000 PoE switch with cable runs to 7 rooms, plus a conduit run to an outbuilding for a hardline and an AP. Cat 6a all the way.
Rating: 2 Votes
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