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Testing the New FaceTime Attention Correction Feature in iOS 13

The most recent beta of iOS 13 was released yesterday, and it brought an interesting new "FaceTime Attention Correction" feature that changes the way that FaceTime works.

FaceTime Attention Correction, when enabled, adjusts the set of your eyes so that it looks like you're making eye contact with the person you're FaceTiming even when you're looking at the iPhone's screen rather than the camera itself. It's a little difficult to explain, so we've made a hands-on video to demo how it works.

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When you're using FaceTime, you naturally want to look at the display to see the other person you're talking to rather than the camera, which has the effect of making you look like you're not maintaining eye contact.

As can be seen in the video, iOS 13 corrects this and makes it so that when you're looking at the iPhone's screen, your gaze appears to be on the camera, allowing eye contact to maintained be maintained while still letting you keep your gaze on the friend or family member you're FaceTiming with.

In iOS 12 and with FaceTime Attention Correction disabled, FaceTime looks like it always does - with no direct eye contact.

FaceTime Attention Correction appears to use an ARKit depth map captured through the front-facing TrueDepth camera to adjust where your eyes are looking for a more personal and natural connection with the person that you're talking to.

Twitter users have discovered the slight eye warping that Apple is using to enable the feature, which can be seen when an object like the arm of a pair of glasses is placed over the eyes.

You can access FaceTime Attention Correction on iPhone XS, iPhone XS Max, iPhone XR, and 2018 iPad Pro models running the third developer beta of iOS 13. It's a setting that's available in the FaceTime section of the Settings app.

Related Roundups: iOS 13, iPadOS


Top Rated Comments

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2 weeks ago
The future is so fake in every way.
Rating: 22 Votes
2 weeks ago
I actually think this is pretty clever.
Rating: 20 Votes
2 weeks ago
where will this end? Removal of blemishes? Removal of wrinkles? No more receding hairline? How about looking 20lbs lighter by getting rid of chubby cheeks and double chins?
Why not just let a freaking animoji do the talking while you're taking a shower?
Rating: 18 Votes
2 weeks ago
Dunno what it is specifically—maybe just the angle—but it doesn't seem to make much of a difference when demoed in the video.

Creepy :(

Then leave it off.
Rating: 16 Votes
2 weeks ago
Creepy :(
Rating: 15 Votes
2 weeks ago
I agree this is quite creepy. My subconscious mind goes to great lengths to avoid direct eye contact in real life. Now, with the computer altering my appearance in ways I don't even realize, it's going to make people think either I like them more than I do, or that I am no where near as afraid of them as I am. What if it starts creeping them out as to how often I'm looking straight at them? I just don't know if I can deal with this kind of intimacy getting forced on me.
Rating: 9 Votes
2 weeks ago
Nice demo with the straw
Rating: 9 Votes
2 weeks ago

This is a solution in search of a problem. Now fake eyes will be staring at you all the time. Is that really better than someone just looking below the camera? You'd rather a computer simulates someone looking at you? Sad, sad times.

Calm down. This feature is helpful because I’m tired of looking at the camera in my interviews, and not focusing on the person. It looks stupid when your looking down the entire time
Rating: 8 Votes
2 weeks ago
This is a solution in search of a problem. Now fake eyes will be staring at you all the time. Is that really better than someone just looking below the camera? You'd rather a computer simulates someone looking at you? Sad, sad times.
Rating: 8 Votes
2 weeks ago

where will this end? Removal of blemishes? Removal of wrinkles?


That's already a feature in the corporate videoconferencing solution we use, "Touch Up My Appearance".

Besides, people have been doing this for literally decades. News anchors and guests on TV? They have makeup on. That's how people expect others to look on screen.

And this effect is exactly why they invented the TelePrompTer. They project the words on a mirror in front of the camera lens.

Mr. Rogers looking at you? Nope, he's reading off the screen.
Rating: 7 Votes

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