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iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro Systems Must Pass Apple Diagnostics to Function After Certain Repairs [Updated]

Due to advanced security features of the Apple T2 chip, iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro models must pass Apple diagnostics for certain repairs to be completed, according to an internal document from Apple obtained by MacRumors.


For the 2018 MacBook Pro, the requirement applies to repairs involving the display, logic board, Touch ID, and top case, which includes the keyboard, battery, trackpad, and speakers, according to the document. For the iMac Pro, the requirement only applies to logic board and flash storage repairs.

If any of these parts are repaired in an iMac Pro or 2018 MacBook Pro, and the Apple diagnostics are not run, this will result in an inoperative system and an incomplete repair, according to Apple's directive to service providers.

Apple's diagnostic suite is limited to internal use by Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Service Providers, as part of what is called the Apple Service Toolkit. As a result, independent repair shops without Apple certification may be unable to repair certain parts on the iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro.

Moreover, when the iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro are eventually classified as vintage products, meaning they are no longer eligible for hardware service from Apple, repairs through alternative channels might not be possible.

MacRumors has reached out to Apple for comment.

This requirement is a result of the T2 chip, which integrates several previously separate components, including the system management controller, image signal processor, audio controller, and SSD controller. It also features a Secure Enclave coprocessor for secure boot, encrypted storage, and authenticating Touch ID.

To initiate a Mac repair, visit the Get Support page on Apple.com.

Update: Despite the specific wording of Apple's document, which says failure to run Apple diagnostics after certain parts are replaced in T2-equipped Macs "will result in an inoperative system," the repair experts at iFixit swapped out the display and logic board on a 2018 MacBook Pro, and it remained operational without passing diagnostics.

iFixit is not an Apple Authorized Service Provider, so at this time, it appears that independent repair shops should be able to repair the iMac Pro and 2018 MacBook Pro without issue. It's unclear why Apple's document suggests otherwise.

Related Roundups: MacBook Pro, iMac Pro
Tag: T2 chip


Top Rated Comments

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6 weeks ago
The only thing left for Apple to do with planned obsolesce is to have a device self destruct on a certain date.
Rating: 60 Votes
6 weeks ago
Honestly?! I have spent 3500 EUR on a 13 inch MBP that is not as fast as a Dell XPS that costs 1/2 as much. The storage is not upgradable. The memory is not upgradeable. Everything is glued together inside the case - if anything breaks I might as well throw away the laptop and buy a new one.

Now compare to my previous laptop - a 2011 MacBook pro. Everything was upgradeable. I bought it with 4GB RAM and upgrade to 16. It came with 256GB hard disk - I upgraded to a 1TB SSD. I replaced the keyboard when I spilt liquid on it - it cost 30 EUR in parts and I fitted it following an ifixit guide.

Look at where we are!! Out of principle, I honestly don't think my next laptop will be a Mac.
Rating: 38 Votes
6 weeks ago
Sorry, but: What the actual f, Apple?
Rating: 37 Votes
6 weeks ago
Have several Macbooks and enjoy using them. Also have a new Dell XPS 15 4K that I can completetly tear down and rebuild from the ground up using a Dell provided maintenance/assembly guide. Guess more Dells and less Macbooks as time goes on (really dislike concept of $3500 disposable computers).
Rating: 34 Votes
6 weeks ago
Sounds futuristic and all, but considering I still regularly use technology from 20 years ago which sometimes requires maintenance and repair, this sounds like a horrible ecological choice on Apple's part.

At the minimum, I hope there is a way to disable these kinds of features when Apple designates them as vintage products.
Rating: 33 Votes
6 weeks ago
Well, looks like I won't be buying new Macs. The anti-consumer measures and excessively priced hardware have done it.
Rating: 32 Votes
6 weeks ago
Even though we live in a world of disposable electronics, this is disheartening to many.
Rating: 21 Votes
6 weeks ago
This is ridiculous. Apple, the moment i pay you for one of your products, it's MINE; and I reserve the right to have ANYONE I CHOOSE repair it. This is authoritarian, and anti-freedom. Shame on you.
Rating: 18 Votes
6 weeks ago
So will stuff like this make the coming Mac Pro unable to use generic hardware, or be upgraded or repaired? I'm gonna lmao
Rating: 17 Votes
6 weeks ago
Now, more than ever, we need to legislate a right to repair in most states: https://ifixit.org/ and https://repair.org/stand-up/ have ways you can help.
Rating: 17 Votes

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