Apple's Bud Tribble to Offer Support for 'Comprehensive Federal Privacy Legislation' at Senate Hearing on Wednesday

Apple is sending longtime employee and Vice President of Software Technology Bud Tribble to a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Wednesday to offer support for federal privacy regulations, reports Axios.

According to Tribble's prepared statement obtained by Axios, he plans to "convey Apple's support for comprehensive federal privacy legislation that reflects Apple's long-held view that privacy is a fundamental human right."

padlocksenatecommittee

"We want your device to know everything about you; we don't feel that we should," he'll say. "These concepts have guided our design process for years because privacy is a core value at Apple, not an obligation or an aftermarket add-on."

Tribble will echo sentiments that Apple executives have shared time and time again, explaining Apple's belief that customers have a right to keep their personal information private, a stance that differs from companies like Facebook and Google.

Back in June, Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview that privacy "from an American point of view" is one of the "key civil liberties" defining what it means to be American. Cook has also said multiple times that Apple's customers are not its product.

"We could make a ton of money if we monetized our customers," Cook said in March. "If our customers were our product. We've elected not to do that. We're not going to traffic in your personal life."

Tribble will be testifying before the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation alongside representatives from other tech and media companies that include Amazon, Twitter, Google, AT&T, and Charter Communications.

Ahead of the meeting, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, released a proposal for consumer data privacy protection and is seeking public comment. The NTIA is asking for feedback on certain desired outcomes for organizational practices:

  • Organizations should be transparent about how they collect, use, share, and store users' personal information.
  • Users should be able to exercise control over the personal information they provide to organizations.
  • The collection, use, storage and sharing of personal data should be reasonably minimized in a manner proportional to the scope of privacy risks.
  • Organizations should employ security safeguards to protect the data that they collect, store, use, or share.
  • Users should be able to reasonably access and correct personal data they have provided.
  • Organizations should take steps to manage the risk of disclosure or harmful uses of personal data.
  • Organizations should be accountable for the use of personal data that has been collected, maintained or used by its systems.

These are the same kind of topics that will be explored during the privacy-focused Senate hearing, which is designed to "examine the privacy policies of top technology and communication firms" as well as review the "current state of consumer data privacy."

Update: Tribble's prepared remarks are embedded below.

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Top Rated Comments

Jimmy James Avatar
55 months ago
More than design, feautures, or UI, this is what really matters. This is what keeps me solidly with Apple products.
Score: 11 Votes (Like | Disagree)
iLoveDeveloping Avatar
55 months ago
Never heard of that guy before, on reading the title I thought - what’s a Bud Triddle?
Score: 8 Votes (Like | Disagree)
Kaibelf Avatar
55 months ago
This seems like an exceptionally good idea. The list of points seem quite reasonable, and hard to argue against it being a good idea.

Not sure why this needs to be in PRSI. Someone will probably be along shortly to prove the need.
Since it’s about potential law it’s definitely political simply by nature. Either way I suspect 99% of posters will support this idea as we all know what bunk it is to wreck encryption wholesale just because (once again) authorities want to throw around “national security” in order to do ridiculous things and give powerful tools to people who have proven they can’t properly secure what they already have.
Score: 8 Votes (Like | Disagree)
keysofanxiety Avatar
55 months ago
I was completely bemused by this title and thought Tim Cook’s best friend was a massive Tribble or something. Maybe I’ve been watching too much Trek.

Thankfully the article cleared it up.
Score: 7 Votes (Like | Disagree)
mark-in-mk Avatar
55 months ago
Bud Tribble. Awesome Name.
Sorry, but it is.
Score: 7 Votes (Like | Disagree)
spinedoc77 Avatar
55 months ago
('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/09/25/apple-bud-tribble-senate-privacy-legislation/')


Apple is sending longtime employee and Vice President of Software Technology Bud Tribble to a Senate Commerce Committee hearing on Wednesday to offer support for federal privacy regulations, reports Axios ('https://www.axios.com/apple-privacy-regulations-senate-commerce-3800556c-2c3b-4a45-b9b4-d82488cde140.html').

According to Tribble's prepared statement obtained by Axios, he plans to "convey Apple's support for comprehensive federal privacy legislation that reflects Apple's long-held view that privacy is a fundamental human right."


Tribble will echo sentiments that Apple executives have shared time and time again, explaining Apple's belief that customers have a right to keep their personal information private, a stance that differs from companies like Facebook and Google.

Back in June, Apple CEO Tim Cook said in an interview ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/06/04/tim-cook-cnn-interview-privacy/') that privacy "from an American point of view" is one of the "key civil liberties" defining what it means to be American. Cook has also said multiple times that Apple's customers are not its product.

"We could make a ton of money if we monetized our customers," Cook said in March ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/03/28/tim-cook-mark-zuckerberg-comments/'). "If our customers were our product. We've elected not to do that. We're not going to traffic in your personal life."

Tribble will be testifying before the US Senate Committee on Commerce, Science, and Transportation alongside representatives from other tech and media companies that include Amazon, Twitter, Google, AT&T, and Charter Communications.

Ahead of the meeting, the National Telecommunications and Information Administration, part of the U.S. Department of Commerce, released a proposal ('https://www.ntia.doc.gov/press-release/2018/ntia-seeks-comment-new-approach-consumer-data-privacy') for consumer data privacy protection and is seeking public comment. The NTIA is asking for feedback on certain desired outcomes for organizational practices:

* Organizations should be transparent about how they collect, use, share, and store users' personal information.
* Users should be able to exercise control over the personal information they provide to organizations.
* The collection, use, storage and sharing of personal data should be reasonably minimized in a manner proportional to the scope of privacy risks.
* Organizations should employ security safeguards to protect the data that they collect, store, use, or share.
* Users should be able to reasonably access and correct personal data they have provided.
* Organizations should take steps to manage the risk of disclosure or harmful uses of personal data.
* Organizations should be accountable for the use of personal data that has been collected, maintained or used by its systems.
These are the same kind of topics that will be explored ('https://www.commerce.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/pressreleases?ID=240B5C17-CBD5-4039-A9E4-CF2FADFF4712') during the privacy-focused Senate hearing, which is designed to "examine the privacy policies of top technology and communication firms" as well as review the "current state of consumer data privacy."

Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues ('https://forums.macrumors.com/forums/politics-religion-social-issues.47/') forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is limited to forum members with at least 100 posts.

Article Link: Apple's Bud Tribble to Offer Support for 'Comprehensive Federal Privacy Legislation' at Senate Hearing on Wednesday ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/09/25/apple-bud-tribble-senate-privacy-legislation/')
Nice, once again I am happy with allowing Apple to gouge me with my phone purchase. This on the heels of yet AGAIN another week not going by without another Google privacy insult. These privacy issues have become almost daily for Google. https://techcrunch.com/2018/09/24/security-experts-say-chrome-69s-forced-login-feature-violates-user-privacy/ I just uninstalled Chrome from all my PC's, not really sure why I still had it installed as it's a piss poor browser anyway even without all the privacy issues.
Score: 4 Votes (Like | Disagree)

Popular Stories

maxresdefault

Can't Get an iPhone 14 Pro? Here's Why You Should Wait for the iPhone 15 Ultra

Monday December 5, 2022 11:44 am PST by
Due to production issues at Apple supplier factories in China, the iPhone 14 Pro and iPhone 14 Pro Max are backordered and basically out of stock at every store. If you were planning to gift or receive an iPhone 14 Pro model for the holidays and didn't already get one, you're basically out of luck because they're gone until late December. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more ...
Apple advanced security Advanced Data Protection screen Feature

FBI Calls End-to-End Encryption 'Deeply Concerning' as Privacy Groups Hail Apple's Advanced Data Protection as a Victory for Users

Thursday December 8, 2022 2:45 am PST by
Apple yesterday announced that end-to-end encryption is coming to even more sensitive types of iCloud data, including device backups, messages, photos, and more, meeting the longstanding demand of both users and privacy groups who have rallied for the company to take the significant step forward in user privacy. iCloud end-to-end encryption, or what Apple calls "Advanced Data Protection,"...
General iOS 16 Feature Yellow

iOS 16.2 for iPhone Launching This Month With These 8 New Features

Thursday December 1, 2022 8:44 am PST by
Apple plans to publicly release iOS 16.2 for the iPhone in mid-December, according to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman. The update remains in beta testing for now, with at least eight new features and changes already uncovered so far. iOS 16.2 introduces a number of new features, including Apple's new whiteboard app Freeform, two new Lock Screen widgets for Sleep and Medications, the ability to hide...
maxresdefault

Hands-On With Apple Music Sing in iOS 16.2

Wednesday December 7, 2022 12:24 pm PST by
With the iOS 16.2 release candidate that came out today, Apple added the new Apple Music Sing feature that was announced earlier this week. We thought we'd check out the new karaoke feature to see how it works. Subscribe to the MacRumors YouTube channel for more videos. Apple Music Sing is available on modern iPhones and iPads, as well as the newest Apple TV 4K. It's built in to the Apple...
Apple car wheel icon feature yellow

Apple to Charge Under $100,000 for Apple Car, Launch Planned for 2026

Tuesday December 6, 2022 2:31 pm PST by
Apple is aiming to launch an Apple-branded consumer-oriented vehicle by 2026, and its goal is to hit a price point under $100,000 to make the car appeal to a wider range of customers, reports Bloomberg. Apple initially planned to design a car that might look similar to Canoo's Lifestyle Vehicle, where passengers could face one another in a limousine-style car with no steering wheel or...
General iOS 16 Feature Yellow

iOS 16.2 for iPhone Expected to Launch Next Week With These 12 New Features

Thursday December 8, 2022 7:05 am PST by
iOS 16.2 is expected to be released next week following nearly two months of beta testing. With last-minute additions like Apple Music Sing and Advanced Data Protection, the software update now has over a dozen new features for the iPhone. Below, we've recapped many of the new features coming with iOS 16.2, including Apple's new whiteboard app Freeform, two new Lock Screen widgets, the...
introducing apple music sing

Apple Music Adding a Karaoke Experience With Apple Music Sing

Tuesday December 6, 2022 7:09 am PST by
Apple today announced Apple Music Sing, a new feature in Apple Music that lets users sing their favorite songs with adjustable vocals and more. Apple Music Sing will utilize Apple Music's real-time lyrics to allow users to sing to their favorite songs using adjustable vocals, background vocals, and duet view to allow more than one singer.Apple Music Sing includes: Adjustable vocals: Users...
Twitter Feature

Twitter to Charge $11 Per Month for Twitter Blue on iPhone, $7 on Website

Wednesday December 7, 2022 6:47 pm PST by
Twitter plans to charge $11 per month for a Twitter Blue subscription on the iPhone in order to account for the 30 percent cut that Apple takes from in-app purchases, reports The Information. On the web, Twitter Blue will be priced at $7 per month. Prior to when Twitter Blue was paused, Twitter was charging $7.99 for a subscription, but the pricing will change before it relaunches. According ...
Apple advanced security Advanced Data Protection screen Feature

Apple Announces End-to-End Encryption Option for iCloud Photos, Notes, Backups, and More

Wednesday December 7, 2022 10:00 am PST by
Apple today announced it is expanding end-to-end encryption to many additional iCloud data categories on an opt-in basis for enhanced security. iCloud already protects 14 data categories using end-to-end encryption by default, including the Messages app when backups are disabled, passwords stored in iCloud Keychain, Health data, Apple Maps search history, Apple Card transactions, and more,...