Rare Apple-1 Headed to Auction in September

The latest Apple-related auction will kick off on September 25, offering bidders the chance to get their hands on a rare Apple-1 computer. On sale by RR Auction, the Apple-1 is fully operational and one of around 70 Apple-1 computers that remain of the first 200 built by Steve Jobs and Steve Wozniak in 1976.

Executive vice president at RR Auction, Bobby Livingston, says that the Apple-1 originates from a person who purchased it at The Byte Shop, the store where Jobs and Wozniak originally sold the computers for $666.66. The owner learned BASIC on the computer, wrote small programs, and decided to hold onto the Apple-1 after it became outdated, "realizing it could one day be a piece of computing history." He then tried to sell the Apple-1 to Wozniak in 1982 for $10,000, which "went unanswered."


The new auction will start at $50,000, and is estimated to end between $300,000 and $400,000.
This Apple-1 computer was restored to its original, operational state in June 2018 by Apple-1 expert Corey Cohen, and a video of it running and functioning is available upon request. A comprehensive, technical condition report prepared by Cohen is available to qualified bidders; he evaluates the current condition of the unit as 8.5/10. The most remarkable aspect of this Apple-1 computer is that it is documented to be fully operational: the system was operated without fault for approximately eight hours in a comprehensive test.
Apple-1 computers have been up for auction a few times in the past few years, and the record auction price for an Apple-1 was established in 2016 when one of the computers sold for $815,000. That computer was the "Celebration" Apple-1 and was very rare due to its blank "green" PCB board that was never sold to the public and was not a part of a known production run. Slightly more common, publicly-sold units have recently sold for $130,000.

Additionally, the auction is being promoted with a unique digital "DNA" scan, performed by Invaluable with technology built by Artmyn. This technology scans artwork and objects like the Apple-1, capturing "tens of thousands of photographs" using various light sources and spectrums, including UV lights. The scan generates a "5D interactive file" and an immersive video that lets owners, auction houses, consignors, and buyers see greatly detailed angles, views, and textures for the scanned objects.
The video for the Apple-1 can be seen on Vimeo.
“We couldn’t be more excited about the sale of this historic piece of technology,” said Invaluable CEO Rob Weisberg. “The innovative scanning technology we’re showcasing is a giant step towards greater transparency in the art and collectibles market that we believe will increase buyer confidence in the online art market. To showcase it with an Apple-1 is just incredible and fitting.”

In the case of the Apple-1, the scan will allow a 5D look at the iconic desktop, offering zeroed-in views of distinguishing details on the top and bottom of the piece.
The auction for the Apple-1 will take place at 1 p.m. on September 25, 2018 at WeWorks in Boston.

Tag: Apple-1


Top Rated Comments

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8 weeks ago
The first true "Pro" machine Apple made. These days you can't even solder in your own capacitors. Thanks, Tim.
Rating: 3 Votes
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8 weeks ago
What's with the weird fake version of "Thus Spake Zarathustra"? The music is public domain, so why record some weird bastard version of it?
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago

Huh?? Theres nothing to stop you changing capacitors in modern gear if you want to. You just need the right skills and tools to handle surface mount components.

Surface mount components which incidentally have been used by every major electronics manufacturer for well over 20 years. They are not unique to Apple.

Or was that a joke?


A joke? The only JOKE is the state of Apple's Pro market by DECIDING what components we should have in our computers. Now if I want to have a terrible AM radio which only picks up static, I need to BUY a separate dongle rather than SOLDERING it into a computer. Thanks, Tim.

It's - not - PRO - dammit *slams table professionally*
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago

The first true "Pro" machine Apple made. These days you can't even solder in your own capacitors. Thanks, Tim.


They even put them in cases now to make upgrades harder!
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago

Built by Wozniak. {Period}

Give the great and powerful Woz his due and proper.


With all due respect to the great Woz, Jobs did actually build some of these. And was involved in financing the production just as Woz was.
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago
Built by Wozniak. {Period}

Give the great and powerful Woz his due and proper.
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago

They even put them in cases now to make upgrades harder!


I know, what a joke. I should have the PRO option to craft my own wooden case for it.
Rating: 2 Votes
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8 weeks ago
And estimated to end at $300,000 to $400,000.”

Those are _insane_ numbers for a circa 1976 Apple 1, but it shows the heritage behind the Apple 1 and how it evolved into something no one else could have envisioned in this company today. Interesting back history that someone will appreciate this time-piece.
Rating: 1 Votes
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8 weeks ago
Nice piece of history but not worth the price. Apple is still very popular today and this generation still has fond memories of Jobs and Wozniak but there is no guarantee that this will be the case a couple of decades from now. A computer is not a ‘59 Les Paul or a Stradivarius. Art is also different because the wealthy will always want the privilege of having museum quality pieces on their wall and the supply of the best stuff has dried up and does not come up for sale very often.
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Why spend a few million on a Picasso? You can hire an exceptionally talented artist to reproduce a copy in exquisite detail for a couple thousand.


Why spend a few thousand when there is a village in China where artists specialize in copying certain paintings and do nothing but reproduce them every single day. These can be had from under $100 to a couple hundred depending on the size if bought over there.

As for the real deal, no reproduction will be like the real thing. They will look similar but the exact colors and strokes can never be matched. It really depends on the artist. If we’re talking about someone like Warhol, then having an original is really not a big deal at least imo.
Rating: 1 Votes
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8 weeks ago

Shocking that 70 out of 200 remain, considering that only in the last few years did it become obvious how valuable these would be.

I wonder how many of the other 130 owners realize the expensive mistake they made in not hanging on to their "old" computer.

The first Apple II we got (purchased used), when I was a teenager, had a 3-digit serial number. Was sold off to the neighbors when we moved up to a //e. I'm sad that I didn't keep it around (just for nostalgia, not for speculation).

This one, up for auction, has a seriously weird keyboard and monitor - they both look like they were scavenged from other devices. I wonder if the monitor came out of an old television camera perhaps? And I don't recall ever seeing a keyboard with a 2-key-wide space bar.
Rating: 1 Votes
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