Apple's Everyone Can Code Curriculum Expanding to Schools Serving Blind and Deaf Students

Apple today on Global Accessibility Awareness Day announced that its Everyone Can Code curriculum is expanding to schools serving deaf, blind, or visually impaired students, starting with various locations in the United States in the fall.

everyone can code school
Initial list of participating schools:

  • California School for the Blind (Fremont, CA)

  • California School for the Deaf (Fremont, CA)

  • District 75/Citywide Programs (New York, NY)

  • Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind (St. Augustine, FL)

  • Hadley Institute for the Blind and Visually Impaired (Winnetka, IL)

  • Perkins School for the Blind (Watertown, MA)

  • Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired (Austin, TX)

  • Texas School for the Deaf (Austin, TX)

Everyone Can Code enables students of all ages to learn how to code with Apple's open source programming language Swift. The curriculum involves the iPad app Swift Playgrounds, which lets students use real code to solve puzzles and control characters, and the iBooks course App Development with Swift.


Apple has tailored Everyone Can Code to work with its accessibility features, ranging from its screen-reading technology VoiceOver to Switch Control, which enables switches, joysticks, and other adaptive devices to control what is on the screen.

Apple collaborated with engineers, educators, and programmers from various accessibility communities to make Everyone Can Code as accessible as possible and will work in close coordination with schools to augment the curricula as needed. This will include providing additional tools and resources such as tactile maps to enhance the understanding of coding environments for non-visual learners.

Apple CEO Tim Cook:

Apple's mission is to make products as accessible as possible. We created Everyone Can Code because we believe all students deserve an opportunity to learn the language of technology. We hope to bring Everyone Can Code to even more schools around the world serving students with disabilities.

Bill Daugherty, superintendent at the Texas School for the Blind and Visually Impaired, offered praise for the initiative:

Our students were tremendously excited at our first Everyone Can Code session earlier this year. There are more than 10,400 students with visual impairments in Texas, and the development of this curricula is going to be a big step in opening up coding opportunities for our students and those across the nation.

Apple also announced that, throughout May, all of its retail stores will host accessibility-related sessions for customers. On May 17, Apple's corporate offices in Cupertino, Austin, Cork, and London will hold similar events.


Apple has also revamped the accessibility section of its website for Global Accessibility Awareness Day, which has promoted digital accessibility and inclusion for people with all disabilities on the third Thursday of May every year since 2012.

Top Rated Comments

zipo Avatar
57 months ago
I'd hate to sound like an *******, but coding for blind kids? The issues with doing text to speech and speech to text just for natural languages outside of traditional paper media (books, etc.) are already kind of significant and being a programmer myself I can't think of any way of doing completely sightless coding without it being completely unintuitive. More power to those who are able to make the hurdle and start doing something productive, but I have a feeling it's just going to be an insurmountable obstacle and huge a source of frustration for just about all of them.

Deaf kids I can understand because the only significant additional barrier they have is how different the syntax (language structure, which is very important in programming) is between sign language and spoken languages, which inspired the ones used in programming languages to a quite high degree (Grace Hopper and many other computing language pioneers insisted programming languages needed to

So, because knowledge is power… I am completely blind and work with students at one of the schools on this list. It is this kind of misconception that makes it difficult for the blind to get jobs. You feel programming is insurmountable because you can’t imagine how you would perform that kind of task. Most people imagine all the scary parts about being blind but have no idea about the kind of rehabilitation/adaptive techniques or Assistive Technologies that exist to help people who are blind to interact with technology and by extension the world around them. I started using Dos and Unix/Linux shell accounts during middle school in the early 90s, then various versions of Linux, even before there was a screen reader for the Linux console. I installed Slackware by memorizing the order of pressing certain keys and the only way I knew if I was successful is if when I issued the command to send the terminal output to the serial port if something appeared on my Dos terminal. Today, every major platform has a built-in screen reader. This allows the person who is blind the ability to interact with their computer using the keyboard and hearing synthesized speech. In fact, my first speech synthesizer was a hardware device that connected via serial port. As the processing power of computers could accommodate the software speech, hardware synthesizers became less relevant. That console screen reader for Linux, speak up, was written by a blind programmer from Canada. Speakup is a screen reader that gets compiled along with the kernel either directly or as a set of modules. Commercial screen readers for Windows exist, Narrator is getting to a usable point on later builds of Windows 10. There is a completely free open source screen reader for Windows called NVDA (Non-Visual Desktop Access) that is used all over the world and the two developers who created it are completely blind. Apple likes VoiceOver, Android has Talkback, Gnome and projects based around it have Orca. Back to me, I’ve been programming in C++ since high school, now Python, PHP, PEARL and I’ve been slowly learning Swift when I have time. I am an Assistive Technology Specialist. I have a full-time job with benefits, own a house, have traveled to developing countries in Central America to volunteer to provide technology instruction to teachers of the visually impaired at institutes for the blind, nationally to present at conferences, am an amateur radio operator and have my bachelor’s degree in International Relations. I just started grad school and I am studying Instructional Technology with a primary focus on the best methods to deliver distance learning courses to teachers of the visually impaired in developing countries. The truth is that the technology related fields are areas of work where the blind can contribute and earn a regular salary instead of government social welfare which leads them like me to have a normal quality of life and all the benefits that go along with it. If you are ever able to interview or hire someone who is blind, do not discount their abilities based on what you believe that your abilities would be in that situation because your ideas of your abilities would be limited by your lack of experience or understanding of what is possible. I could write about so many other examples of people who are blind who work in the STEM fields but so can you, a little Googling goes a long way. I hope this helps clear up some of these sadly too common misconceptions.
Score: 5 Votes (Like | Disagree)
velocityg4 Avatar
57 months ago
Everyone can code, but the question is should everyone code? All this will do is flood the market with programmers and lower the wages for everyone in the field even though as Markoth said there's going to be a huge difference of code quality between all of them.

There's a good reason we don't see "Everyone can XYZ" for other job categories.
Just like everyone can write. Not everyone can write a good novel or poetry.

While programming should be available to students. It should be treated like art class, drama, auto shop, wood shop, advanced courses, sports, &c. Only those interested and capable need apply.
Score: 3 Votes (Like | Disagree)
SeminalSage Avatar
57 months ago
]Maybe the reason Apple added this for blind and deaf people is that XCode 9.3.1 still didn't fix the 'diagnosticd' and 'homed' issue with playgrounds that has sighted people worriedly staring at Activity Monitor and hearing their Macs fans running on high while those other folks may not notice either of them. :mad:
Score: 2 Votes (Like | Disagree)
D.T. Avatar
57 months ago
The ad isn't about comparing flagship smartphones, it's about enticing frustrated iPhone 6 users to switch to Samsung/Android! The vast majority of iPhone users are on older hardware -- hence the incessant talk about the next "super cycle" upgrade -- so this is an extremely savvy marketing move on Samsung's part. Most people who watch this ad will immediately identify with the performance issues that it highlights -- it's really that simple.
I think you you're looking for this thread:

https://forums.macrumors.com/threads/samsung-compares-galaxy-s9-to-very-slow-iphone-6-in-frivolous-ad.2119150/page-2#post-26064995

:D
[doublepost=1526578268][/doublepost]This has been discussed (anytime these code camp topics come up), but to just say it again: there are skills learned through the introduction of programming basics that are incredibly useful outside being a professional software developer. Problem identification, logic, time management, teamwork and communication - skills that are useful even outside of an occupation. At the very least, you get kids thinking and engaged and a [potentially] positive experience, and who knows, maybe the next great computer scientist/software engineer will come from one of these events :)
Score: 2 Votes (Like | Disagree)
Markoth Avatar
57 months ago
I believe that everyone can code, but I don't believe most people are willing to take the time, or make the effort to figure it out. Even being bad at programming isn't easy. Being good at it can take years, and most don't last that long.
Score: 2 Votes (Like | Disagree)
spazzcat Avatar
57 months ago
I believe that everyone can code, but I don't believe most people are willing to take the time, or make the effort to figure it out. Even being bad at programming isn't easy. Being good at it can take years, and most don't last that long.
It comes down to logic if you can break a problem down into its logic parts you can code.
Score: 2 Votes (Like | Disagree)

Popular Stories

iphone 14 pro max vs 13 max 2

Camera Comparison: iPhone 14 Pro Max vs. iPhone 13 Pro Max

Thursday September 29, 2022 7:44 am PDT by
The iPhone 14 Pro and Pro Max introduce some major improvements in camera technology, adding a 48-megapixel lens and low-light improvements across all lenses with the new Photonic Engine. We've spent the last week working on an in-depth comparison that pits the new iPhone 14 Pro Max against the prior-generation iPhone 13 Pro Max to see just how much better the iPhone 14 Pro Max can be. Subscrib ...
maxresdefault

Apple Responds to Video Testing Crash Detection Feature With Junkyard Vehicles

Friday September 30, 2022 9:11 am PDT by
The Wall Street Journal's Joanna Stern recently traveled to Michigan to test Apple's new crash detection feature on the iPhone 14 and Apple Watch Ultra. In response, Apple provided some additional information about how the feature works. Stern recruited Michael Barabe to crash his demolition derby car with a heavy-duty steel frame into two unoccupied vehicles parked in a junkyard — a 2003...
iphone 14 iphone 14 plus in hand feature

iPhone 14 Is Secretly Hiding a Beloved Mac Feature

Friday September 30, 2022 3:24 am PDT by
The iPhone 14 and iPhone 14 Pro models bring over a longstanding Mac feature, but the setting to enable it is off by default. The feature, which is actually a new accessibility option, allows the iPhone to play a startup chime like the Mac. When enabled, the sound comes alongside a new shutdown chime. The Mac has featured a startup chime since 1987's Macintosh II, and the iconic "bong"...
adaptive transparency airpods pro

iOS 16.1 Beta Brings Adaptive Transparency to Original AirPods Pro

Thursday September 29, 2022 1:08 pm PDT by
The third beta of iOS 16.1 that was released earlier this week expands the Adaptive Transparency feature introduced with the second-generation AirPods Pro to the original AirPods Pro. As noted on Reddit, first-generation AirPods Pro owners who also have the AirPods beta software will now see an "Adaptive Transparency" toggle in the AirPods section of the Settings app. The 5A304A beta...
iOS 16 Wallpaper Spectrum Feature

Five Wallpaper Apps to Check Out for iOS 16's New Lock Screen Depth Effect

Thursday September 29, 2022 9:08 am PDT by
One of the biggest new features in iOS 16 is a completely redesigned iPhone Lock Screen. The new Lock Screen is entirely customizable, letting you change the colors and fonts, add widgets and new wallpapers, and more to make your iPhone uniquely yours. Of course, even before iOS 16, you could customize your Lock Screen with a wallpaper of your choice. iOS 16 takes the Lock Screen wallpaper...
tony blevins car

Apple Procurement VP Departs Company After Vulgar TikTok Comment

Thursday September 29, 2022 12:38 pm PDT by
Tony Blevins, Apple's vice president of procurement, is set to depart the company after he made a crude comment about his profession in a recent TikTok video, reports Bloomberg. Blevins was in a video by TikTok creator Daniel Mac, who was doing a series on the jobs of people he spotted with expensive cars. After seeing Blevins in an expensive Mercedes-Benz SLR McLaren, Mac asked Blevins what ...
tim cook malala

Tim Cook: Not Too Long From Now, You'll Wonder How You Led Your Life Without AR

Thursday September 29, 2022 7:26 am PDT by
Speaking at Università Degli Studi di Napoli Federico II in Naples, Italy, Apple CEO Tim Cook said that not too long from today, people will wonder how they led a life without augmented reality, stressing the "profound" impact it will have on the not so distant future. At the university, Cook was awarded an Honorary Degree in Innovation and International Management and also sat down for a...
Hero0005

Best Apple Deals of the Week: M2 MacBook Air Hits New All-Time Low Price at $1,049, Plus Sales on AirPods Pro and More

Friday September 30, 2022 9:05 am PDT by
This week's best Apple deals focus on the AirPods Pro, AirPods Pro 2, and M2 MacBook Air, including numerous all-time low prices on these devices. You'll also find up to 50 percent off discounts on Anker and Eufy accessories on Amazon. Note: MacRumors is an affiliate partner with some of these vendors. When you click a link and make a purchase, we may receive a small payment, which helps us...
zuckerberg metaverse

Apple CEO Tim Cook: 'I'm Not Really Sure the Average Person Can Tell You What the Metaverse Is'

Friday September 30, 2022 12:51 pm PDT by
Apple CEO Tim Cook has been touring Europe this week, sitting down for interviews with various media publications. Augmented reality has been a running theme in Cook's discussions, and it is a topic he brought up again in an interview with Dutch publication Bright, which is part of RTL News. "I think AR is a profound technology that will affect everything," Cook said, echoing comments from...
ipad pro m1 feature

Gurman: Apple Event This October Remains Unlikely, No Touch ID for iPhone 15

Sunday October 2, 2022 6:41 am PDT by
Apple is developing new iPad Pro, Mac, and Apple TV models, and at least some of these products will be released in October, according to Bloomberg's Mark Gurman. However, Gurman continues to believe that Apple is unlikely to hold an event this month. In the latest edition of his Power On newsletter, Gurman said "the big iPhone 14 unveiling last month was probably it for Apple in 2022 in...