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Zero-Day Acquisition Platform Triples iOS 10 Bug Bounty to $1.5 Million

Exploit acquisition platform Zerodium has increased its reward for a successful jailbreak of iOS 10 to $1.5 million, far surpassing Apple's recent payout offer for discovering and reporting vulnerabilities in its software.

Late last year, Zerodium briefly offered and paid out $1 million to one hacking team for the successful creation of a browser-based jailbreak for iOS 9.1 and 9.2, but dropped the going rate for an exploit to $500,000.

zerodium
Rather than report the vulnerabilities to Apple, Zerodium said that it would sell the exploit to its customers, which include major technology, finance, and defense corporations, as well as government agencies.

Instead of being limited to a specific timeframe, the new $1.5 million reward is a permanent offer that aims to compensate for Apple's recently hardened security regime, said Zerodium founder Chaouki Bekrar.
We've increased the price due to the increased security for both iOS 10 and Android 7, and we would like to attract more researchers all year long, not just during a specific bounty period as we did last time.
At the same time, Zerodium's decision to up its bug bounty can be seen as a response to the imminent launch of Apple's own program.

Last month at the annual Black Hat Conference, Apple announced the launch of an invite-only Security Bounty Program that would offer rewards of up to $200,000 to researchers depending on the vulnerability discovered. Apple said the program would be limited to a few dozen researchers and would go live in September.

Earlier this week, several news media outlets were seemingly duped into reporting on an alleged 'secret' meeting of prominent hackers at Apple's Campus in Cupertino, which was supposed to include a briefing on the company's bug bounty program. The meeting was apparently a hoax perpetrated by the hackers themselves.



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Top Rated Comments

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33 months ago

Why should not this be legal ?

If i sold a vulnerability of you home alrm system to someone would you like that?
Rating: 26 Votes
33 months ago

If i sold a vulnerability of you home alrm system to someone would you like that?

Just because I don't like something doesn't automatically make it illegal.
Rating: 26 Votes
33 months ago
You know, if Apple played their cards right, they could contract someone to work on their behalf and get $1.5Million of of Zerodium's money and directly benefit Apple. In fact, a truly conniving company could create a hidden 'vulnerability', sell it to Zerodium, fix the code right away and sink the potentially sabotaging company.
Rating: 24 Votes
33 months ago
How is this even legal?
Rating: 20 Votes
33 months ago

How is this even legal?


My thoughts exactly. This is a national security issue, not some business deal. We have the Patriot Act, but no legal requirement to report potential security vulnerabilities to the companies that make hardware and software?

Anybody who takes this 'bounty' should be held legally liable, along Zerodium, for any damages caused by a customer exploiting a bug...
Rating: 16 Votes
33 months ago
"Rather than report the vulnerabilities to Apple, Zerodium said that it would sell the exploit to its customers, which include major technology, finance, and defense corporations, as well as government agencies."

Did anybody not see this part ?
Rating: 14 Votes
33 months ago

Just because I don't like something doesn't automatically make it illegal.


All of this buying and selling of exploits amounts to a conspiracy to invade your property and your life.

There isn't a legitimate use for this information, which is why they all call themselves "researchers". Government has their own mechanisms. We absolutely should not farm out security to private contractors who are allowed to amass catalogues of undocumented exploits to important infrastructure. That would be totally ******* crazy.
Rating: 12 Votes
33 months ago
Weaponized iOS exploit: $1.500.000
Weaponized Android exploit: $200.000

1500/200 = 7.5x sounds about right as a difference in security and value of the two platforms.
Rating: 11 Votes
33 months ago

You mistakenly interpret this as a difference in security, where it could simply reflect a price difference in the equipment required to discover security flaws.

For all we know, iOS could have many more security flaws that Android has, but they're more expensive to find due to its closed-source aspect.

Apple has shown itself careless and cavalier with security flaws both on OSX and iOS, and coasts on its "security through obscurity" belief, which is hardly any security at all.


security through obscurity... what obscurity? iOS has a BILLION devices in use.

Zerodium's CEO words can't be more clear, let's requote them: "That means that iOS 10 chain exploits are either 7.5 x harder than Android or the demand for iOS exploits is 7.5 x higher. The reality is a mix of both"
Rating: 10 Votes
33 months ago

How is this even legal?

Why should not this be legal ?
Rating: 8 Votes

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