Opera Desktop Browser for Mac Officially Launches With Built-In VPN

Norway-based company Opera Software has brought its VPN feature to the masses with the release of Opera 40 desktop browser for Mac.

For those unfamiliar with the technology, a VPN creates an encrypted tunnel from the user's computer to the VPN server, which hides browsing activity from other users on the local network and enhances security and privacy online. It shields a user's real IP address, allowing them to bypass firewalls, block tracking cookies, and access geo-restricted content regardless of their true location.

opera-vpn-press-image
"If people knew how the internet truly works, I believe they all would use a VPN," said Krystian Kolondra, SVP of Opera browser for desktops, in a blog post. "By making our browser VPN free and easy to use, we hope to make it an essential tool, just as the lock and key is to your house."
We know that people are concerned about their privacy online and that the interest for VPN is increasing. However, two major obstacles are blocking people from using it: VPNs are too complicated to use, and they require a monthly subscription. Opera resolves both issues by introducing its free and easy-to-use service right into the browser.
Opera's VPN supports AES-256 encryption and auto-selects the best server to route users' traffic through, based on speed, latency, and traffic congestion. Currently the service has server locations in the U.S., Canada, Germany, Singapore, and the Netherlands.

VPNs typically come in the form of separate plug-ins or client apps, making Opera one the first major browsers to include one as standard. The feature comes after the company's acquisition of U.S. VPN company SurfEasy last March. Opera has been testing the VPN in developer betas since April, and says that neither it nor SurfEasy logs any information about a user's browsing history.

Opera 40 also includes an automatic battery saving feature, Chromecast support, video pop-outs, a newsreader with RSS support, built-in ad-blocking, and an overhauled browser engine.

The Norwegian firm is on the verge of a $600 million deal with a Chinese consortium which will transfer ownership of its apps to a group that includes anti-virus company Qihoo 360.

Users can download Opera 40 browser from the company's website.



Top Rated Comments

(View all)
Avatar
32 months ago
Norway-based? Sold to china.
Rating: 6 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago
and selling their portfolio to China really tops up that safe feeling
Rating: 4 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago
This is now a Chinese browser. I'm so conflicted over it because it was finally becoming good again after the Chromium reboot. Storing my user credentials and using VPN's with some Chinese product? I'm just using Vivaldi now. I don't have a good feeling about this at all.
Rating: 4 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago
Safari should have this features also.
Rating: 3 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago

The Norwegian firm is on the verge of a $600 million deal with a Chinese consortium which will transfer ownership of its apps to a group that includes anti-virus company Qihoo 36


LOL! An example of a security oxymoron right here...
Rating: 3 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago
The exit point of the vpn is controlled by opera I assume. That means that they could intercept and log all traffic from their server to the destination website.

I would rephrase the comment in the article like this:
If people truly knew how a vpn worked, they would think harder about who the operator of the vpn is and what they can do.
Rating: 3 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago

I see the recommendation for PIA, do you guys have any others that would be good for iOS and MacOS both.


VyprVPN from GoldenFrog is stellar. Tons of servers across the globe, great speeds, and fantastic apps on both iOS and MacOS. The apps feature things like per-application required VPN with a kill switch if your vpn disconnects (macOS).
Rating: 2 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago
Sorry, I don't trust a Chinese company to handle VPN for me, could see all my browsing. Will download it for when I need to use VPN on international trips.
Rating: 2 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago

I always found Opera slow compared to Safari, it's a no go for me.

Another thing is I need a systemwide VPN, this one only has a Browser VPN as far as I understand.


PIA Private Internet Access about $ 35 a year, responsive company and works extremely well (Over 2 years )
Some financial institutions will not let you log in, as they detect the "re-directing" of your connection. So, temporarily disconnect and then re-connect.
[doublepost=1474373188][/doublepost]

I wish this had been available during my trip to the Bahamas. We wanted to watch some HBO one rainy night, but the website wouldn't let us in because the Bahamas aren't on the list of countries where you're allowed to stream content to.

I investigated VPN options, but everything was super seedy looking or charged lots of money (or in most cases, both).


See my other post about PIA Private Internet Access. $ 35.00 apr. nothing shady.
Rating: 2 Votes
Avatar
32 months ago

"If people knew how the internet truly works, I believe they all would use a VPN,"

Says a recently hacked company....

Hey, your house will be safe with me watching over it, I have just been robbed myself........that's my credential!


Uh....Will be sold to a Chinese company and will be a "safely encrypted" VPN so no one can access...

Who is kidding who. No access except the government. There is no such thing as privacy in a Communist country. Amazing the lack of knowledge people have in a knowledge based Era.

Probably in history 1,000 years later (if the planet is still around) they will say "The Information Age" was when the world forgot or understood the least when the most information was available....but was also the most filtered or the most skewed.
Rating: 1 Votes
[ Read All Comments ]