New in OS X: Get MacRumors Push Notifications on your Mac

Resubscribe Now Close

Part-Time Apple Employees Now Eligible to Participate in Charitable Matching Program

One of Tim Cook's first acts when he became CEO of Apple was to institute a charitable matching program for employees. Under the program, Apple would match employees' personal contributions to 501(c)(3) charitable organizations up to $10,000 per year. However, the program initially only applied to US-based full-time employees.

Now, it seems Apple has expanded the program to include part-time US employees as well, and covering international workers soon, according to a tweet from the Apple Retail Workers Union twitter account.


As of November 2011, some two months after the program went into effect, Apple had matched $1.3 million in employee contributions, with the $2.6 million dollars donated in total.



Top Rated Comments

(View all)

98 months ago


I think Jobs was a bit of a Scrooge...seems Tim's new policies on employee discounts and company matching are a new chapter in Apple's missing "Giving Back" Chapter of the company's history.


Not a bit, a total scrooge.
Rating: 9 Votes
98 months ago
1.3 million? Wow! That's almost one ten thousandth of one percent of their last quarter's profits!
Rating: 5 Votes
98 months ago

1.3 million? Wow! That's almost one ten thousandth of one percent of their last quarter's profits!


If I worked at Apple, I'd donate to improve maths education.


Very true, ...


Well, no. One ten thousandth of one percent of last quarter's profit is about $13,000.
Rating: 5 Votes
98 months ago
very nice total for 2+ months of a program.

But for a company with 60,000+ FULL TIME employees, that $2.6 million needs to continue to equate to about $15mill a year in donations....as well as donations from Apple itself. 1.3 million divided by 60,000 employees is $21 per employee for the 2 months...or about $120/year per employee if they continue to give.

Sure, nobody HAS to give anything, but it's the right thing to do as a large corporation in the USA...as well as being a super duper over-performing company.

I think Jobs was a bit of a Scrooge...seems Tim's new policies on employee discounts and company matching are a new chapter in Apple's missing "Giving Back" Chapter of the company's history.
Rating: 3 Votes
98 months ago
Modest as this is, why did it have to wait for Steve to die to happen? While I admire him for the many things he did achieve, the (apparent) lack of concern for the wider world in which he lived was not among his admirable traits.
Rating: 1 Votes
98 months ago
The number is what it is because it's a match program, dependent upon how much EMPLOYEES contribute. Apple may make other charitable contributions on their own (as does my employer) but how can this number be any higher unless employees *elect* to contribute more?

How much does any one of us elect to give to charity in proportion to our disposable income?

Companies don't have to do a match program. The ones that do are being brand smart and charitable at the same time.

Never look a gift horse in the mouth.
Rating: 0 Votes
98 months ago

I think Jobs was a bit of a Scrooge...seems Tim's new policies on employee discounts and company matching are a new chapter in Apple's missing "Giving Back" Chapter of the company's history.


Apple still has a long way to go before they even make it to piss poor on Giving back. They are WAY WAY behind the rest of the industry in the matching program much less everything else.
Rating: 0 Votes
98 months ago

Modest as this is, why did it have to wait for Steve to die to happen? While I admire him for the many things he did achieve, the (apparent) lack of concern for the wider world in which he lived was not among his admirable traits.


Steve Jobs was a very private person. We don't know how much he gave to charity. We do know that Tim Cook is a smart guy, and realizes that Apple, even if it gave a way a ton of money, would get negative PR unless people find out about it.
Rating: 0 Votes
98 months ago

Apple still has a long way to go before they even make it to piss poor on Giving back. They are WAY WAY behind the rest of the industry in the matching program much less everything else.


I've worked for about 6 companies since 1994...ranging from public to private and 60 employees to over 300,000 employees...all have had some kind of matching gift program.

It's very sad that Apple, for decades, never had such a program...especially since the past 10+ years Apple has had nothing but huge success, huge earnings, huge success, and huge profits. Pretty disgusting that Apple has tens of billions of dollars in the bank but can't match (until now) a few million dollars every year (which is also very likely tax deductible or some kind of write-off). THE EMPLOYEES are giving (as we now see) but Apple refused to give. Great job, Apple. Way to set an example.
Rating: 0 Votes
98 months ago

1.3 million? Wow! That's almost one ten thousandth of one percent of their last quarter's profits!


Well if only enough folks apply for a match for that much . . .

----------

Modest as this is, why did it have to wait for Steve to die to happen? While I admire him for the many things he did achieve, the (apparent) lack of concern for the wider world in which he lived was not among his admirable traits.


Steve Jobs was a student of Buddhism, which believes that announcing your charity is more about your ego than actual charity. He may have given billions and we would never know because his name isn't on it.
.
Rating: 0 Votes

[ Read All Comments ]