Pixelmator 2.0 Launches Tomorrow, With Content-Aware Fill and Full Lion Support [Now Available]


Version 2.0 of popular image editing application Pixelmator goes live tomorrow on the Mac App Store. The app was one of the early success stories on the Mac App Store, generating more than $1 million in revenue in the first 20 days.

The new version of Pixelmator includes support for a number of Lion features, including Full Screen, Auto Save, and Versions. It also includes an advanced healing tool, similar to Adobe Photoshop's Content Aware-Fill technology, moving an advanced feature into a brand new price point. The Loop has some additional screenshots.

Pixelmator 2.0 will be initially priced at $29.99, though the regular price will be $59.99. The Pixelmator team told us they hadn't decided exactly when the price will rise. Version 2.0 will be available on the Mac App Store tomorrow.

Version 1.6 of Pixelmator is available for $29.99 on the Mac App Store. Users who have purchased Pixelmator from the Mac App Store will receive the version 2.0 upgrade for free.

Update: Pixelmator 2.0 is now available in the Mac App Store for $29.99.


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72 months ago


I wish the mods on this forum would at least temporarily ban you for making such ridiculous comments for guest and other members to read. I mean it when I say your posts are OFFENSIVE. They are an insult to my intelligence and others. This one is especially an insult to every graphic designer whos spent more than 5 minutes and 30 dollars on getting to a professional status.


Funny, this is kind of how I felt after reading your screed, but I don't need the moderators to ban you.

I work with pros and I work with amateurs and bar none know-it-all pros (who don't) are the worst to deal with.

Not every pro works in the same way on the same content with the same needs, therefore not every pro is alike. Pixelmator will meet the needs of some and will not meet all the needs of others--fine. These same arguments are swirling around FCPX. I use it for some thing, 7 for others, and Premiere for yet others. In some shops X is a flat out no go--I see that, but in other cases it's a terrific tool. On the Creative Cow forums right now is a thread on how FCPX is being used for the current World Series broadcasts--seems pretty professional to me. Same with Pixelmator.

Wikus, stop being so close-minded and condescending to other tools and solutions (and people). Frankly, that is not "pro" behavior and I would not hire anyone who acted that way--it demonstrates a lack of mental flexibility that I expect for problem-solving, let alone being in the field of creativity. And it just comes off as jerky.

regards.
Rating: 16 Votes
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72 months ago
Pixelmator

Does this program do something that PS can't?


Yes... It works.

Adobe needs to recode all their products with a revamped interface, speed, make it stable, and lower their prices.
Rating: 13 Votes
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72 months ago

Excuse me?

Ive used pixelmator enough both on my own installation and my dads to know that it lacks any kind of professional use. I have photoshop, therefor I have no need for pixelmator.


The fact that you are getting angry with anyone saying Pixelmator is good is ridiculous. You left a huge rant against LTD about his "apple fanboyism" but you are the complete opposite and cannot give credit where credit is due.

I do a lot of professional work with Pixelmator. I use both Pixelmator and Photoshop. Pixelmators real time filters and tools are a TON better than Photoshops non real time filters and tools (IE gradient tool), and Pixelmator is a lot faster, hence why for certain things I use Pixelmator instead of Photoshop.

Not to mention the "you get what you pay for" doesn't hold water here. Tell people who purchase CS3 or CS4 that. I'm pretty sure they all feel ripped off as they were horrible iterations of CS.

Another thing is real pros don't stick to one tool, they use the tools they need to get the job done. If one program does something better than another the pros will use it. If you limit yourself to only photoshop you will be missing a lot of potential workflow improvements. Photoshop is a great tool, but its far from the best at everything.
Rating: 13 Votes
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72 months ago

As a graphic designer, pixelmator is for noobs. I'd never use it for work.


"Noob", while a derogatory term, implies the level of skill at the user, not the required features aforementioned user is required to complete a certain task. Please stop being annoying.

Thing is, before Pixelmator, there was nothing between the pile of horse droppings that is GIMP, and Photoshop. It has never been, nor will it ever be, aimed to become an industry standard application for use in professional studios.
Rating: 10 Votes
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72 months ago
As has been said by many pro web guys, we can't move from Photoshop to Pixelmator fully until Pixelmator supports a full suite of non destructive layer styles:

Drop Shadow,
Bevel,
Stroke,
Glow,
Inner Shadow
etc..

Unless I missed something this release still doesn't have layer styles? I am a happy owner of v1.6, but it's just frustrated me each time I have tried to do a full web layout in it quickly. Believe me when I say I am VERY KEEN on switching from the hog that is photoshop to pixelmator. I ditched Dreamweaver a couple of years ago in favour of Espresso and can never, ever go back.

Scott
Rating: 8 Votes
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72 months ago

free upgrade if the first was bought through MAC APP STORE ONLY?? i bought it before the app came to the app store, or the app store even existed. Would about the early adopters??? how come i don't get a free upgrade?? unless I'm misunderstood...


The purpose of the upgrade was only to get people who otherwise would have waited for 2.0. It wasn't designed as a "if you buy version n, you'll always get version n+1". I imagine they wanted to get a proof of concept on the App Store, before deciding to go 100% App Store only for the general release of 2.0. The free upgrade path allowed them to get a fair number of new users (who otherwise may have waited until 2.0), as well as existing users that liked the idea of (legally) using Pixelmator on multiple machines. Pay for that privilege now, get the (more compelling purchase motivation) 2.0 upgrade later.



NOBODY in the industry uses pixelmator. Waltz into any professional agency or studio and 100% of the time they will be using Adobe CS and I stress the word PROFESSIONAL because I strongly believe you don't understand what professional means in the real world.


See, the problem with making a 100% claim is that it only takes 1 instance to prove that you're wrong. So: you're wrong. I'm a developer, and I use Pixelmator for 90% of my PSD editing. I'm not a designer, but I'm a person that is manipulating PSD files PROFESSIONALLY. It does everything I need it to, and at a significant price savings. Previously, every person in an agency that needed to work with PSD files -- UX, Design, Project Managers, Developers, Creatives -- ALL needed to have Photoshop. Now, only the Designers really need it. Most, if not all of the other people can be perfectly fine using Pixelmator. That's a HUGE market. And the difference from Photoshop Elements to Pixelmator is huge, if for no other reason than PSE _still_ can't open layer groups.
Rating: 8 Votes
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72 months ago

Check it out...

http://www.gimp.org/


Meh, I've used Gimp for quite a while and it's really quite terrible to be honest. It runs horribly on Mac OS X and uses X11. It also uses Windows/Linux shortcuts which is irritating and the UI looks atrocious.

The best thing I can say about it is it's passable for being free.
Rating: 6 Votes
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72 months ago

The noob population (that Apple caters to in particular) getting access to powerful, easier tools is growing almost daily. These noobs are getting more and more powerful tools placed into their hands. This trend has become especially noticeable over the last few years. The noobs then become Pro-sumers. Pro-sumers displace the so-called "Pro" market because things that formerly only Pros could do are much more accessible by Pro-sumers.

So, soon enough, most of us will learn and do your "work", having gone through less of a learning curve, and doubtless with some of your work already automated.

The "Pro" "graphic designers" of today might well be out of a job down the line. It's all about greater accessibility and making complex technology easier to understand.

Yes, soon Joe Average will edit just like the Pros.


Just because you can hold a hammer you are no carpenter. Just because you can hold a spoon you are no cook. Just because you have a brain doesn't mean that you use it.
Rating: 6 Votes
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72 months ago

You just don't get it. Installing a tool on your computer doesn't give you any understanding of typography, composition, illustration skills, character design etc. etc.

Installing a tool on your computer also doesn't provide you with an original idea.

By your logic anyone with a simple enough version of Autocad on his computer could come up with great industrial design. So Jonathan Ives design of Apple products is really nothing special, because anyone on the street could have done it given a simple enough software.

By your logic I'm a carpenter because I can hold a hammer.


I think you're being overly harsh in your analysis. Being able to hold a hammer doesn't make you a master carpenter immediately, but being able to buy a significantly cheaper hammer with fewer whiz-bang features than the expensive one gives you the opportunity to learn carpentry in a way that will satisfy your needs. And those whiz-bang features eventually trickle down to the cheaper models, making it possible that non-pros can grow as the tools they are getting comfortable with do. That doesn't mean there won't be a pro market at all. Sometimes there is no substitute for formal training or artistic gifts, but sometimes you just want to drive a nail into some wood and you don't want to have to hire someone just to do it.
Rating: 6 Votes
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72 months ago
This prosumer debate reminds me of the audio world. When ProTools and other platforms started to be marketed to the masses with a small piece of gear included, and via a cheap $500 price point, supposedly "everyone" then had access to "pro" gear and could "create music" "like the pros".

It did liberate many people when it comes to making basic tracks and simple demos. But if I had a dollar for every time a kid with an MBox and a dream brought the shreds of his album to my pro engineer friends begging them to fix it, I'd be a rich man. The sound of professional production is, more often than not, learned via a lot of experience and hard lessons.

No matter what, it's not the meat; it's the motion.

That said, I'm rooting for Pixelmator, but only because --regardless of professional abilities-- software should cost less than Adobe charges....particularly for upgrades...
Rating: 6 Votes
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