Wi-Fi calling


'Wi-Fi calling' Articles

Many Sprint Customers Unable to Use Wi-Fi Calling on iOS 11.2 [Updated]

Sprint customers with an iPhone are widely reporting that Wi-Fi calling does not work after installing iOS 11.2 and carrier settings version 31.0. Hundreds of complaints have surfaced across the web, including the MacRumors discussion forums, Sprint and Apple Support Communities, Twitter, and Reddit, since the software update was released earlier this month. All models of the iPhone that support Wi-Fi calling appear to be affected, ranging from the iPhone 6 to iPhone 8 Plus, among others. It's unclear if the issue is due to iOS 11.2 or the updated carrier settings, which support features like Wi-Fi calling and VoLTE. AT&T, Verizon, and T-Mobile customers are not affected, suggesting this is a carrier-specific problem. Many affected customers have performed basic troubleshooting, such as resetting the iPhone's network settings or simply turning the device off and on again, but there doesn't appear to be a solution that works on iOS 11.2. As a temporary workaround, some users have downgraded to iOS 11.1.2 and found that Wi-Fi calling becomes functional again. MacRumors does not have an iPhone on the Sprint network in its possession, so we're unable to reproduce the issue. Sprint directed us towards Apple, which has not responded to multiple requests for comments over the past few days. Last week, a support representative on Sprint's website relayed that the carrier plans to apply a temporary fix across a limited number of Wi-Fi calling servers while evaluating a long-term solution to the apparent bug. After several days, however, Wi-Fi calling is only

Wi-Fi Calling and VoLTE Expand to O2 and Other Carriers on iOS 10.3

Following yesterday's iOS 10.3 release, several carriers around the world have enabled support for native Wi-Fi calling and VoLTE on iPhone. In addition to updating to iOS 10.3, the features require installing a carrier settings update to be enabled. Your device should prompt you to install the carrier settings update in Settings > General > Software Update. Features may be limited to certain iPhone models, so check with your carrier. British carrier O2, for example, has only enabled support on iPhone 7 and iPhone 7 Plus right now, with plans to add other devices soon. The full list of carriers that have just enabled native Wi-Fi calling on iOS 10.3:Australia: Optus Austria: A1 Telekom Belgium: Telenet Greece: Cosmote Hong Kong: 1010 Norway: Telia Poland: Orange, Play Switzerland: Sunrise United Kingdom: O2The full list of carriers that have just enabled VoLTE on iOS 10.3:Denmark: 3 Greece: Cosmote Peru: Movistar Poland: Orange Russia: MegaFon Turkey: Turk Telecom United Kingdom: O2To enable Wi-Fi calling, open the Settings app, tap on General > Wi-Fi Calling, and toggle on Wi-Fi Calling on This iPhone. To enable VoLTE, open the Settings app and tap on Mobile Data > Mobile Data Options > Enable 4G > Voice & Data. Meanwhile, Verizon customers with an iPhone running iOS 10.3 can now make and receive Wi-Fi calls on other iCloud-connected devices, including the iPad, iPod touch, Apple Watch, and most 2012 or later Macs, even if the iPhone is turned off. The devices must be signed into the same Apple ID used on the iPhone. Update: Slovenia's

Three UK Now Supports Native Wi-Fi Calling on iPhone

British carrier Three has seeded a carrier settings update—version 27.1—that enables native Wi-Fi calling on iPhones. Three previously required iPhone customers to use its free Three inTouch app for Wi-Fi calling, but the carrier settings update released on Friday introduces system-level support for Wi-Fi calls and texts under Settings > Phone > Wi-Fi Calling.We know that sometimes you can't get signal when you're indoors, but that shouldn't mean that you have to go off the grid. With Three inTouch Wi-Fi Calling, you can call and text whenever you're on Wi-Fi in the UK, even if there’s no mobile signal.Three joins EE and Vodafone among carriers in the U.K. with native support for Wi-Fi calling on

Verizon Will Support Wi-Fi Calling on Other iCloud Devices on iOS 10.3

Verizon customers running the new iOS 10.3 beta have discovered that the carrier has added an option for Integrated Calling (Calls on Other Devices). The feature enables iPhone users to make and receive Wi-Fi calls on other iCloud-connected devices, including the iPad, iPod touch, Apple Watch, and most 2012 or later Macs, even if the iPhone is turned off or not on the same Wi-Fi network. The devices must be signed into the same Apple ID used on the iPhone. AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile already support Wi-Fi calling on supported iCloud-connected devices, so Verizon was the last holdout among the four major carriers in the United States. The feature is also supported by smaller U.S. carriers MetroPCS and Simple Mobile and by a few other carriers internationally. Wi-Fi calling on other devices may not be live yet for all Verizon customers on iOS 10.3 beta, but it should be ready in time for the final

AT&T Expands Wi-Fi Calling to Cover International Calls to U.S. When Traveling

AT&T first introduced Wi-Fi calling in October of 2015, allowing customers to place calls over Wi-Fi in instances where a cellular connection is poor. At launch, AT&T's Wi-Fi calling feature could only be used within the U.S., Puerto Rico, and the U.S. Virgin Islands, but as of this week, Wi-Fi calls can also be made from other countries. Starting this afternoon, and following the iOS 9.3 update, AT&T began sending text messages to customers notifying them of the change. When traveling abroad, a call placed to the United States or received from the United States using Wi-Fi calling will incur no long distance charges, a feature that should be highly useful to AT&T customers who are visiting another country and calling home. As long as a U.S. number is calling another U.S. number using Wi-Fi calling, there will be no charge, regardless of physical location. Calling an international number from a U.S. phone with Wi-Fi calling will continue to incur standard international call charges. In a domestic coverage area, Wi-Fi calling is enabled whenever wireless network coverage is weak or unavailable. When outside of a domestic coverage area, Wi-Fi calling is now turned on whenever a phone connects to a Wi-Fi network. AT&T's Wi-Fi calling website has been updated with new text to reflect the updated capabilities.Use Wi-Fi Calling to talk and text over an active Wi-Fi connection. Wi-Fi Calling lets you talk and text from indoor locations where it's hard even for a strong cellular signal to reach. Wi-Fi Calling can be used in the Domestic Coverage Area (U.S., Puerto Rico,

Verizon's Wi-Fi Calling Coming to Galaxy S6 on Monday, iPhone 'Early Next Year'

Verizon yesterday announced that it will begin rolling out support for Wi-Fi Calling next week, starting on Monday with Samsung's Galaxy S6 and S6 Edge. iPhone users will need to wait a bit longer, with an update enabling the feature expected "early next year." Wi-Fi Calling will initially be available on the Samsung Galaxy S 6 and Samsung Galaxy S 6 Edge and will be rolled out as a software update in phases. Additional Android and iOS devices will receive Wi-Fi Calling capabilities via future software updates expected early next year.Wi-Fi Calling allows phone calls to be automatically placed over Wi-Fi connections in areas where cellular service is poor, seamlessly transitioning between cellular and Wi-Fi as needed. Sprint and T-Mobile have supported the feature for some time, and AT&T launched its support in early October. AT&T made waves by claiming Sprint and T-Mobile have been offering the feature illegally, due to Federal Communications Commission requirements for supporting a teletypewriter (TTY) feature for deaf and hard-of-hearing users. AT&T received its waiver from the FCC just days later, and Verizon followed with its own request, with the FCC approving it

Verizon Gets Green Light on FCC Waiver Needed for Wi-Fi Calling

Verizon Wireless is the only major carrier in the United States that has not introduced Wi-Fi calling, but it appears that could change in the near future as the FCC today approved the company's request for an FCC waiver [PDF] that will allow it to move ahead with its plans. Like AT&T, Verizon applied for an FCC waiver to delay implementing a teletypewriter (TTY) service for deaf and hard-of-hearing people until December 31, 2017. Verizon plans to use real-time text (RTT) as an alternative and the waiver will allow it to avoid offering a TTY service until its RTT technology is deployed and operational. On its website, Verizon says it plans to support Wi-Fi calling "in the future," but has not specified when Wi-Fi calling could be implemented. When AT&T was approved for Wi-Fi calling, the feature was turned on within days of receiving the go ahead from the FCC. Wi-Fi calling will allow Verizon customers to make phone calls over Wi-Fi in situations where their cellular signal is low, automatically transitioning between Wi-Fi and a cellular connection as needed. AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile have all already implemented Wi-Fi calling, but Sprint and T-Mobile have done so without obtaining the necessary waivers from the

Sprint Announces Enhanced Wi-Fi Calling Feature for iOS 9.1 Users

Alongside the launch of iOS 9.1, Sprint has implemented an enhanced Wi-Fi calling feature for its users, allowing them to make and receive calls on multiple iOS and Mac devices over Wi-Fi or a cellular connection. Prior to today, it was possible for Sprint users to make and receive calls from iPads and Macs using an iPhone's cellular connection, but that functionality did not extend to calls placed over Wi-Fi when cellular signal was low. The iOS call forwarding feature implemented with iOS 8 that allowed users to make and receive calls from multiple devices required Wi-Fi calling to be turned off, but that is no longer the case. Calls placed or received on devices other than an iPhone will now work over a cellular connection and when connected to Wi-Fi with Wi-Fi calling in use. Receiving calls on multiple devices with the call forwarding feature also required devices to be on the same Wi-Fi network as an iPhone, but with enhanced Wi-Fi calling, that's no longer necessary. In fact, an iPad or a Mac can still receive a call when an iPhone is in another location entirely or turned off. Sprint users can access the new enhanced Wi-Fi calling feature by downloading iOS 9.1, watchOS 2, or OS X 10.11.1 on their devices and making sure Wi-Fi calling is enabled on an iPhone by going to Settings --> Phone --> Wi-Fi Calling. Other devices can be set up to receive calls by going to Settings --> FaceTime --> Calls from iPhone. All devices must use the same Apple ID and they must be signed into iCloud. These advanced Wi-Fi calling features, which are outlined in an update

Wi-Fi Calling Now Available for AT&T Users

AT&T has flipped the switch on Wi-Fi calling, making it available to customers with eligible plans that are running iOS 9. MacRumors has received tips from customers who were able to activate Wi-Fi calling and we were able to activate the feature on our own iPhones. A number of readers in our forums are also having success activating Wi-Fi calling. Wi-Fi calling is a feature that lets calls be placed over a wireless connection when cellular connectivity is poor, functioning much like an AT&T M-Cell does now. It's similar to Apple's own FaceTime Audio feature, which also routes calls over a Wi-Fi connection. AT&T customers can turn on Wi-Fi calling by going to the Phone section of the Settings app and toggling on the Wi-Fi calling feature. From there, there are a set of steps to walk through, including entering an emergency 911 address. Wi-Fi calling is available on the iPhone 6, 6s, 6 Plus, and 6s Plus running iOS 9. Customers who want to use Wi-Fi calling need to have AT&T HD voice features enabled, along with an Internet connection. Wi-Fi calling can be used for voice calls within the United States, Puerto Rico, and United States Virgin Islands at no charge. Long distance global voice calls will be charged standard long distance rates. Once the setup process is complete, customers are receiving notifications letting them know the Wi-Fi calling feature will be available after a short activation period. AT&T promised to launch Wi-Fi calling alongside iOS 9, but last week announced the feature was delayed due to its inability to get an FCC waiver that

AT&T Delays Wi-Fi Calling Support Amid Wait for FCC Waiver, Calls Out Sprint and T-Mobile

Originally tested in an iOS 9 public beta back in August, AT&T ultimately held back on a wide public release for Wi-Fi calling due to its decision to wait for an FCC waiver that would temporarily relieve the carrier of needing to offer support options for deaf and hard-of-hearing people. The Federal Communications Commission's rules state that all calling services need support for a teletypewriter (TTY) service for the deaf, but AT&T wants the old-fashioned TTY replaced with real-time text (RTT) support instead. Both TTY and RTT offer support for the deaf and hard-of-hearing to conduct non-voice conversations, but AT&T's RTT service wouldn't be ready until 2016, leading to the carrier's request for a temporary waiver from needing to implement TTY support until then. Yesterday, AT&T resubmitted its request for such a waiver to get its Wi-Fi calling service off the ground, simultaneously calling out Sprint and T-Mobile for deciding to move forward with similar services without supporting the FCC's rules (via Fierce Wireless). The company stated that the original launch date for Wi-Fi calling was set to be September 25, alongside the launch of the iPhone 6s and iPhone 6s Plus, but without the proper waiver from the Federal Communications Commission, the carrier decided to hold off on the launch of the service for now. "This past Friday, September 25, was the date on which AT&T intended to introduce Wi-Fi calling services in competition with other competitors in the market, namely T-Mobile and Sprint," AT&T wrote in its filing. "Those carriers have been offering Wi-Fi

iOS 8.3 Enables WiFi Calling for Sprint, EE Subscribers

Today's iOS 8.3 update expands iOS 8's WiFi calling feature to two new carriers: Sprint in the United States and EE in the United Kingdom. WiFi calling is a feature that was first introduced in iOS 8, letting users make phone calls using WiFi instead of a cellular network when connected to a WiFi network. T-Mobile has thus far been one of the only carriers to support Wi-Fi calling in the United States, until today. Following the iOS 8.3 update, Sprint users can toggle on Wi-Fi calling in the "Phone" section of the Settings app, which will let them make calls over Wi-Fi when a Wi-Fi network is available. Wi-Fi calling can be useful when cellular signal is low, and calls also have improved sound over Wi-Fi. According to Sprint's website, users will need to install the iOS 8.3 update and download Carrier Version 19.1. Sprint says the carrier update can be triggered by going to Settings --> General --> About after installing iOS 8.3, but the company's announcement suggests it may take a few days to roll out to everyone. Enabling Wi-Fi calling is a similar process for EE subscribers in the United Kingdom. According to Engadget, EE users will need to update to iOS 8.3 and then enable WiFi calling in the Settings app, after which the feature will be activated in a few hours. EE's limiting the number of iPhones able to register for WiFi calling to 100,000 per day, so there may be a waiting period for some users. WiFi calling is available for iPhone 5c, 5s, 6, and 6 Plus users with Sprint and EE