cybersecurity


'cybersecurity' Articles

Melbourne Teen Pleads Guilty to Hacking Apple Servers and Accessing Customer Accounts [Updated]

A Melbourne schoolboy has pleaded guilty to hacking into Apple's secure network after the company notified authorities of the intrusion (via The Age). The teen, who can't be named for legal reasons, appeared at an Australian Children's Court on Thursday facing allegations of hacking into Apple's servers on multiple occasions. Details of the case are still sketchy, but the boy's hacking is said to have begun at the age of 16, and included downloading 90 gigabytes of secure files and accessing "authorized keys" that grant login access to users. The boy is said to have attempted to hide his identity using a number of methods including "computerized tunnels", a system which had "worked flawlessly" until the teen was caught. That chain of events began when Apple apparently detected the unauthorized access and blocked the source of the intrusions. It subsequently notified the FBI, which passed on the information to the Australian Federal Police, resulting in a warrant being executed at the family home last year. Prosecutors said the raid turned up a "litany of hacking files" on a computer laptop and hard drive, as well as a mobile phone with an IP address that matched the source of the intrusions. The boy's lawyer said the teen was a fan of the company and had "dreamed of" working for Apple. His lawyer also asked the magistrate's court not to disclose some of the details of the case because the boy is well-known in the hacking community and it could put him at risk. The magistrate's court acknowledged the guilty plea, and the case has been adjourned until

Apple CEO Tim Cook Speaks at White House Cybersecurity Summit

Apple CEO Tim Cook is at the White House Summit on Cybersecurity and Consumer Protection which is occurring now, and he is expected to speak for approximately 10 minutes beginning at 11 a.m. Pacific Time, ahead of a presidential address set to take place at 11:15. The summit is being streamed live on YouTube and can be watched below. The White House is expected to unveil its next executive action on cybersecurity at today's summit. The event includes tech executives, academics, government officials, with several panels on topics like payment security, and improving cybersecurity practices at consumer oriented businesses. Update: During his speech at the Summit, Apple CEO Tim Cook highlighted Apple's commitment to privacy and security, once again pointing out that Apple makes its money by selling products and services, not by selling personal data. "Our customer's trust means everything to us," said Cook. "We spent decades working to earn that trust. Privacy and security are built into every one of our products and services." He went on to detail Apple's use of encryption across hardware and software, and its security monitoring, which goes on 24/7. "We set the industry's highest standards," he said. "And we are deeply committed to living up to them." Apple Pay was a major focal point of the speech, and Cook described how it's far more secure than a plastic card with a magnetic stripe. He also once again pointed out that Apple does not track Apple Pay data and he announced a partnership with the federal government that will see Apple Pay available for many

Tim Cook to Speak at White House Cybersecurity Summit

Apple CEO Tim Cook will speak at a White House cybersecurity summit on Friday at Stanford University, according to The Hill. The summit is another battleground in which tech companies and the government will discuss encryption. The White House is expected to reveal its next executive action on cybersecurity at the summit, which will bring together tech executives, leading academics and government officials to discuss ways in which the government can better collaborate with the private sector on cybersecurity initiatives. Cook and other technology executives have called for government surveillance reform, calling for limitations on government authority to collect users' information, oversight and accountability, transparency about demands and more. Meanwhile, the FBI has been in talks with companies like Google and Apple about their privacy features and have expressed concern that their encryption makes it difficult for investigators to infiltrate a kidnapper or terrorist's device for information that could prevent crimes or attacks. One Department of Justice official told Apple that investigators' inability to access their devices could lead to children dying. FBI Assistant Director Joe Demarest Jr. and Secret Service Deputy Director A.T. Smith are two of the government officials who will give remarks on Friday. Note: Due to the political nature of the discussion regarding this topic, the discussion thread is located in our Politics, Religion, Social Issues forum. All forum members and site visitors are welcome to read and follow the thread, but posting is