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Apple Shares New 'Remembering Apollo 11' Video With Details on Upcoming Apple TV+ Show 'For All Mankind'

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, Apple this afternoon shared a new video featuring clips from its upcoming Apple TV+ show "For All Mankind" along with commentary from show creator Ronald D. Moore and others who have worked on the series.

"For All Mankind," which stars Joel Kinnaman, features an alternate history that explores what might have happened had the global space race never ended and had the USSR landed the first humans on the moon. In the series, the U.S. will race to get astronauts on Mars and Saturn.


In the new spot highlighting "For All Mankind," Moore says that the space program "captured the world's imagination" when it first happened. "There's something about putting people in spaceships and going places. It's an idea of this optimistic feature where we not only travel in space, but it's been a good thing for all of mankind," he said about the show.

"For All Mankind" was inspired by the Apollo 11 mission and the space race, according to executive producer Matt Wolpert.
In celebration of the 50th Anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, watch as the executive producers of For All Mankind discuss the incredible human achievement of landing on the moon. For All Mankind, an Apple Original drama series, is coming this fall to Apple TV+. Get notified when Apple TV+ premieres on the Apple TV app: https://www.apple.com/apple-tv-plus

Acknowledging the bold and daring human spirit that got us to the moon and continues to inspire one generation after the next, "Remembering Apollo 11" highlights the collaboration, the intelligence, and the imagination it took.
Along with the new video, Ronald D. Moore and other show creators, engineers, and advisors did a series of interviews with various publications. Speaking to Inverse, Moore said that Apollo 11 was the catalyst that got him interested in science fiction. He decided to work with Apple because of an existing relationship with Zack Van Amburg, a former Sony executive and now one of the co-presidents running Apple TV+.
"I said to Zack, that the more exciting thing to me, was to do the space program that I felt we were promised and we never got. And that's how the journey to the alternate history version was born. So that's why it's at Apple, it came out of our personal relationship," Moore says.
In a separate interview with Syfy, "For All Mankind" technical advisors Garrett Reisman and Gerry Griffin, both of whom worked for NASA, said that they aimed to make the show as accurate as possible, even when it was difficult.
Getting cathode-ray tube displays, for example, was a nightmare that the production team cheated by using flat-screen TVs and putting a piece of curved glass to simulate the old-school screens. The NASA logo was another difficulty. In watching the trailer, fans may notice the logo is just a little off, like the Bizarro version of the real-life NASA symbol. That's because, as the trio explained, NASA has a policy to only lend support and use of emblems if the piece of media portrays the events of the space program exactly as they happened. Not really a possibility for an alt-history show.
Additional interviews and show details are available from Collider, CollectSPACE, and IndieWire.

"For All Mankind" is one of the TV shows that Apple is working on for its upcoming Apple TV+ streaming service, set to launch this fall. Apple has dozens of shows in the works, and a recap of everything that Apple is working on is available in our Apple TV+ show guide.

Though the first season of the series has yet to debut, Moore says that a second season is already being discussed. The team is getting stories and scripts ready, but Apple hasn't yet officially picked it up for a second season. "We're already moving ahead with planning in case they do," Moore told Syfy.



Top Rated Comments

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10 weeks ago

I thought the original sci-fi show aired 50 years ago?

Honestly, easier to just fly to the moon than fake flying to the moon. Yeah, it’s all fake and that satellite system that works our global GPS and mapping systems just magically happened. All smoke and mirrors, tin foil hat man.
Rating: 27 Votes
10 weeks ago

I thought the original sci-fi show aired 50 years ago?


Oh I get it haha because it was all fake right
Rating: 12 Votes
10 weeks ago
Meanwhile this film is a true non-fiction work of art

[MEDIA=youtube]tL0-vWVR6Sk[/MEDIA]
Rating: 10 Votes
10 weeks ago

What really fascinates me and I find it quite bizarre is after 50 years we never managed to go back! Especially with today's outstanding technology!

It was never a matter of capability or technology (after we got there the first time), it's always been a matter of determination. The public lost interest after the first couple moon walks, and the push was to spend the money elsewhere (in part by continuing a disastrous and costly field trip to Vietnam). NASA had lots of plans, most of them were shut down when the funding got pulled. The last several Apollo missions got cancelled, and a couple of already-built real live Saturn V rockets went to museums. We could go back again, if we as a nation (or a planet) had the will to do so.
Rating: 10 Votes
10 weeks ago
If there's one show that will get me to subscribe, this one is it. Aerospace and national pride? Check and check.
Rating: 9 Votes
10 weeks ago
I thought the original sci-fi show aired 50 years ago?
Rating: 8 Votes
10 weeks ago

It costs billions of dollars, and after about 6 trips to the moon they realized it's not all that interesting. Just a lot of the same moon rock they found the first 5 times.

You want to fund the incredible expense to see nothing more than you saw previously?


Planetary geologist here, you are so very, VERY wrong. They found the moons original crust on Apollo 15 (not 11, or 12, or 14) a mineral called anorthosite "the genesis rock ('https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genesis_Rock')" which crystallised when the magma ocean solidified. We also now know from orbital data there is a rock terrain called KREEP ('http://www.planetary.org/blogs/emily-lakdawalla/2011/3013.html') that Apollo astronauts didn't even sample, as we only discovered this AFTER the program, the acronym stands for a rocks that are high in (Potassium, Rare Earth Elements and Phosphorus). These formed after the original crust and are thus enriched in these elements, we really need a sample as that would confirm beyond a shadow of a doubt the large impact hypothesis ('https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant-impact_hypothesis')which we only figured out from going to the moon in the first place! To say nothing of the volatiles in the mantle, or at the poles. The rocks are very VERY different. Especially between missions, and especially from terrestrial rocks.
During Apollo entire geology teams surveyed the moon to choose the best places and the astronauts were given a crash course in under graduate geology, hell even a PhD geologist went to the moon on Apollo 17. All this to make sure were were getting the right rocks back to understand the story of the moon.

Thanks to the Apollo missions. We now know 1) How the moon formed. ('https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Giant-impact_hypothesis') 2) There was an event called the "late heavy bombardment" ('https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Late_Heavy_Bombardment') in the early solar system that effected every planet. The LHB was responsible for delivering all the metals we mine today. ('https://agu.confex.com/agu/fm15/webprogram/Paper79945.html') 2) A dating mechanism ('https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater_counting') for all the bodies in the solar-system which is important for finding life on Mars, as we can date when it last had water at the surface. 3) Why Earth has such a thin crust and plate tectonics (because its orbiting us as the moon). 4) A thin crust and continued volcanism ('https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hydrothermal_vent#Hydrothermal_origin_of_life') may be the crucial step point that it may well explain why there is life on this planet in the first place.

NONE of this would be known without the Apollo missions. We should still not know how the moon formed. The age of the surface of Mars or the other terrestrial planets Where all the metals we mine come from, or why our crust is so thin and we are full of volcanoes.

We have 382kg of lunar material thanks to these missions, and we are still learning new things. Every new advancement in imaging or scientific analysis equipment means we get to go to the moon again for free, and learn something new thanks to this amazing legacy and curational efforts of NASA ('https://ares.jsc.nasa.gov').

This is a picture of me at the lunar vault.

Rating: 7 Votes
10 weeks ago

I thought the original sci-fi show aired 50 years ago?


You’re not far off: the original series of Star Trek was around that time. However it first aired in 1966, 3 years before the moon landing. Close!
Rating: 7 Votes
10 weeks ago
“The NASA logo was another difficulty. In watching the trailer, fans may notice the logo is just a little off, like the Bizarro version of the real-life NASA symbol. That's because, as the trio explained, NASA has a policy to only lend support and use of emblems if the piece of media portrays the events of the space program exactly as they happened. Not really a possibility for an alt-history show.”

NASA was a consultant on the Martian (Ridley Scott movie) and they were able to use the real NASA logo in the film. They wanted the details of what a manned mission to Mars would look like to be as accurate as possible in the movie.
Rating: 6 Votes
10 weeks ago

I thought the original sci-fi show aired 50 years ago?


You mean the one that Kubrick directed and was released the same weekend that Ted Kennedy crashed that car? Good times
Rating: 6 Votes

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