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DriveSavers Lets Consumers Retrieve Data From Locked iOS Devices for $3,900 [Updated]

DriveSavers today announced the launch of a new consumer-facing service that's designed to unlock iOS devices for customers who have forgotten their passcodes, been locked out after too many incorrect entry attempts, or who need to access the data on the device of a deceased family member.

DriveSavers says it is using "new proprietary technology" to recover data from a passcode-locked devices, a service that has previously been limited to law enforcement agencies and unavailable to the average consumer.

It is not known what technology DriveSavers is using to access data on the device. It may be a passcode guessing feature or something related to iCloud data, with the company suggesting it is able to recover data like photos, videos, contacts, text messages, voice recordings, and notes.

The service is advertised for Android, Windows, BlackBerry, and iOS devices, so the full breadth of information DriveSavers can recover from an iPhone or an iPad is unclear.

Law enforcement agencies have long used data recovery hacks and devices to gain access to locked iPhone devices. The most well-known recovery method highlighted in recent months is the GrayKey box, which can brute force the passcode on an iOS device using some kind of proprietary jailbreaking software. The GrayKey was allegedly disabled with iOS 12, but DriveSavers may be using a similar device or unlocking method.

GrayKey iPhone cracking box, via MalwareBytes

Government agencies also have the ability to request data from iCloud straight from Apple, but this is presumably not a method that's available to DriveSavers for consumer data recovery requests.

The Passcode Lockout Data Recovery service is for standard customers only, and DriveSavers says it will not unlock devices for law enforcement or other government agencies. Prior to unlocking a device, DriveSavers verifies ownership "during all phases of the recovery process" and requires a legal authorization form with customers required to provide specific information before data access is provided.

DriveSavers does not provide pricing for its Passcode Lockout Data Recovery Service, and suggests that those interested call the company for more information.

Update: DriveSavers has provided MacRumors with additional info on its iPhone unlocking service. The company is able to fully unlock the iPhone and return the unlocked device to the owner, and there's an option to back up the phone's data to an external device. DriveSavers is not able to provide further information on its unlocking methods.

The service is not inexpensive, priced around $3,900. DriveSavers is also using strict identification protocols, in some cases requesting documents that include death certificates, probate documents, court documents, and more. DriveSavers says that most people use the service to access the data from the device of a deceased loved one.


Top Rated Comments

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2 weeks ago

The GrayKey was allegedly disabled ('https://www.macrumors.com/2018/10/24/graykey-iphone-unlocking-box-disabled-by-ios-12/') with iOS 12, but DriveSavers may be using a similar device or unlocking method.

Wait, you mean that machine wasn't an iPhone breeding device? :eek:

Rating: 39 Votes
2 weeks ago
Oh crapppp! Wife can't see this!
Rating: 23 Votes
2 weeks ago
Will work until the next ios update.
Rating: 20 Votes
2 weeks ago

Maybe not if they keep the hack out of Apple's greedy claws.


‘Here’s your phone and data back Mr.... er... Cim Took? That’s an unusual name... !’
- ‘Why yes, I suppose it is, I was saying the same thing to my friend er... Iony Jve, just the other day...’
Rating: 16 Votes
2 weeks ago

Maybe not if they keep the hack out of Apple's greedy claws.


So now making sure info is secure is "greedy?" Did Apple charge you extra for that?
Rating: 12 Votes
2 weeks ago

Wait, you mean that machine wasn't an iPhone breeding device? :eek:


You sure pump these out quick :)
Rating: 11 Votes
2 weeks ago
You know they're taking money under the table from the feds. They have a lot of money.

Apple will likely seed a device to this company to "use" this service, probably running a special build of iOS that will log everything happening to it in real-time and send that information back home. Then they can get some idea of how this works and close it down in a new update. I was working with Apple a couple weeks ago on a passcode vulnerability in iOS that they said was supposed to be patched shortly but I still haven't seen the patch yet. I wonder if it is somehow related to this.
Rating: 6 Votes
2 weeks ago
Digital privacy is an illusion. We will soon have a social credit score like in China, as well as our financial credit score. Digital information is only safe if no one wants it, it is not safe because it is on an Apple device.

Welcome to our dystopian world. What is your social social score? Our social media companies have enough data to calculate one for you.
Rating: 6 Votes
2 weeks ago

So now making sure info is secure is "greedy?" Did Apple charge you extra for that?


Reading these forums it’s clear that the word “greed” is one of those misunderstood words. Like “economics”.
Rating: 6 Votes
2 weeks ago

Good for them!

So sick of Apple's ********.

And what ****** would that be? Allowing people to keep their private info private?

If I wanted my family to have what was in my phone after I’m dead, I’d give them the password. Otherwise it’s nobody’s damn business what I have on there.
Rating: 5 Votes

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