'BioShock Remastered' Launches for macOS Computers on Steam, Mac App Store Coming Soon

Earlier in August, it was announced that a remastered version of the popular first-person shooter BioShock would be arriving on macOS platforms sometime this year. Today, BioShock Remastered has launched for compatible Mac computers on Steam and the online Feral store, and an official version of the remastered game for the Mac App Store is set to debut in the near future.

Users who download the game through Steam can get it for just $6.59 (£3.29) until August 28 [Direct Link].


BioShock Remastered is launching ten years and one day after the original BioShock debuted on Microsoft Windows and Xbox 360 on August 21, 2007. For its original release, Irrational Games developed BioShock, while 2K published it, and now the remastered version for Mac is being published by Feral Interactive, which publishes many games for macOS, iOS, and Linux platforms.

BioShock [Direct Link], BioShock 2 [Direct Link], and BioShock: Infinite [Direct Link] are already available for purchase on the Mac App Store, but the first game in the series was last updated in April 2012 and lacked enhanced graphics that more recent Macs can allow for. BioShock Remastered enhances the original game to run at 1080p with a higher frame rate, similar to last year's Windows- and console-only launch of BioShock: The Collection.

The remastered game also includes a wealth of additional content from the original release, as well as DLC added later. The Museum of Orphaned Concepts is a museum-style level that players can walk through to visit early concept art and other ideas that never made it into the final version of BioShock. The game's major DLC, the Challenge Rooms, are also in BioShock Remastered and exist out of the central storyline to offer the player various puzzle and combat challenges.

There's also a director's commentary featuring Ken Levine and Shawn Roberson, achievements support, full controller support, high resolution textures, models, and interface, and 4K resolution support on compatible Macs and displays.

To run BioShock Remastered, Mac users will need a 2.4Ghz Intel Core i5 processor, macOS 10.12.5 (released May 2017), 8 GB of RAM, and 27 GB of available space. Feral Interactive has broken down exactly which Macs will run BioShock Remastered at its full potential, as well as the Macs that are capable of playing the game, "but do not consistently meet the standards required for official support."

Macs officially supported:
  • All 21.5" iMacs since late 2013 (1GB Nvidia GT 750M Models are not officially supported)
  • All 27" iMacs since late 2013 (1GB Nvidia GT 755M Models are not officially supported)
  • All 13" MacBook Pros since late 2016
  • All 15" MacBook Pros since late 2013
  • All Mac Pros since late 2013
Macs that can run the game, but lack standards required for official support:
  • All 21.5" iMacs since early 2013
  • All 13" Retina MacBook Pros since mid 2012
  • All 27" iMacs since late 2012 with a 1GB graphics card
  • All Mac Mini's since late 2012
  • All 13" MacBook Pros since mid 2012
  • All 15" MacBook Pros since mid 2012 with a 1GB graphics card
  • All MacBook Airs since mid 2012
  • All MacBooks since early 2015
  • All Mac Pros since 2009 with an AMD 7950 (Mac Edition) graphics card
Otherwise, the game hasn't changed since 2007 and is set in an underground city called Rapture that was built in the 1940s, afterwards falling into a state of disrepair due to a civil war between Objectivist leader Andrew Ryan and crime lord Frank Fontaine. Players arrive to the city in 1960 after their plane crashes somewhere over the Atlantic Ocean, and must use Rapture's gene-altering Plasmids, as well as more traditional FPS weapons, to fight their way through the city's hordes of splicers.

Those interested can head over to the game's Steam page, or the Feral store, to download BioShock Remastered on Mac starting today.

Tag: Feral


Top Rated Comments

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16 months ago
I already bought BioShock for my iPad but it doesn't work since it was abandoned by the developers. Not getting my money again.
Rating: 9 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

It supports Metal, right?


Yes!
https://twitter.com/feralgames/status/893443375675961344

But not Metal 2 yet (obviously, since that comes with High Sierra).

[doublepost=1503410036][/doublepost]

Was going to post the same, not a chance I pay again to them for this. Totally ripped off everyone previously.


Not good of course. I don't think Feral Interactive was involved in the iPad version, though.
Rating: 7 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

I already bought BioShock for my iPad but it doesn't work since it was abandoned by the developers. Not getting my money again.


Was going to post the same, not a chance I pay again to them for this. Totally ripped off everyone previously.


That port had nothing to do with Feral, it was a 2K port. In my opinion, it never should have been ported to iOS in the first place. The amount of compromises to graphics, controls, and overall game play... yeesh.
Rating: 6 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

You're kidding, right? Yeah, Apple could do more to encourage game developers to support the platform but the hardware itself is definitely not the problem.


False.

The GPUs in every Mac is hot garbage. Their iMacs, despite being desktops, use a mobile GPU. The Mac Pro still has GPUs based on the ATI 79xx series chipset... from FIVE years ago.

You're not going to do any kind of serious gaming with that kind of deadbeat system.
Rating: 5 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

Wow, a game from 2007 is compatible to Mac in late 2017.

Wrong. The original OS X port was in 2009.
Rating: 5 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago
It supports Metal, right?
Rating: 5 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

Wow, a game from 2007 is compatible to Mac in late 2017.


That kind of stuff just solidifies that Macs are complete joke for gaming... which is an industry bigger than hollywood.
Rating: 5 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago
Wow, a game from 2007 is compatible to a Mac in late 2017.
Rating: 5 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

In all honesty that's not a huge difference (and I'm someone who doesn't really care about gaming on OS X.)

2 years vs 10 years not a huge difference? I must be going mad, but I really though that 10 years is 5 times as much time as 2 years ;)
Rating: 4 Votes
Avatar
16 months ago

You're kidding, right? Yeah, Apple could do more to encourage game developers to support the platform but the hardware itself is definitely not the problem.

Unfortunately they are right. I believe the best way to describe it is: "Barely adequate".

Not for gaming mind you, it's completely inadequate for even casual games these days (Trine, Hearthstone). It gets by for rendering the desktop environment and a few GPGPU tasks.

The very fastest GPU that Apple is shipping today is the high end SKU on the 2017 27-inch iMac, the Radeon Pro 580. It's around the same speed as a Nvidia GTX 970 from September 2014 (LOLOLOLOLOLOLOL).

Unfortunately, Apple is all aboard the AMD train for their future GPUs. We've seen Polaris and now we've seen Vega... Nvidia is crushing them. I don't know what Nvidia did to get Apple to dump them, but it's making me sad.



Correct me if I'm wrong, but aren't "mobile GPUs" just desktop silicon, but modified for lower power consumption? It's largely the same architecture and the exact same capabilities. I just worry that people discussing this topic use "mobile" as some pejorative without actually explaining what exactly is wrong with the GPU.

I even see people complaining that MacBooks should have nVidia GTX 1080s in them which is confounding to hear. This would of course mean using multiple USB-C chargers just to power and charge the MacBook.

It seems that the majority of comments on the Internet about PC hardware are by people who "know enough to be dangerous". They know little more than how to plug in a PCIe card and the model number of the latest nVidia card. There's never any mention of how Apple could get the cooling to work or maintain battery life and convenient charging.

Historically, mobile GPUs have been custom designs around reduced functional units, clocks, and memory interfaces. A smaller and less capable chip to meet a power and thermal target. This has been problematic for laptops, as well as the iMac, for a long time.

Process improvements first to 28nm and now to 14/16nm have brought about an enormous change to the efficiency of GPUs. We saw the same thing with Ivy Bridge in CPUs. Boosting frequency on-demand combined with a process shrink to 22nm was a major improvement in the capability of mobile CPUs.

Today the dies are small enough and the GPUs are efficient enough that you can put a full-fat chip into a laptop and run it at reduced clocks. That means the GTX 1080 in a laptop is a full desktop GTX 1080. It isn't clocked as high, but it's within 20-30% of the desktop part, which is amazing.

Apple has missed the boat on this revolution completely in the iMac. For the first time with the GTX 10-series they were able to produce an all-in-one with no drawbacks. Skylake, Pascal, and SSDs means that it is possible to build a no-compromise iMac. Fast desktop CPU, fast desktop GPU, 32-64GB of RAM, 2TB of PCIe SSD, a great screen. It gives up nothing at all. They should have been ready with this product on day one, it's what the iMac has always wanted to be.

Instead through some combination of incompetence/politics/arrogance, we have mediocre instead of a great product. Such is life. The tech is there, on the shelf to buy.
Rating: 3 Votes
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