Apple Seeking Lower Rates With Record Labels as Initial Deals Start Expiring

Apple is said to be aiming to reduce the share of revenue record labels get from streaming music as it works to establish new deals for Apple Music and iTunes, reports Bloomberg.

Apple is reportedly pursuing lower rates as part of an effort to revise its "overall relationship" with the music industry. Apple's current deals with record labels expire at the end of June, but Bloomberg's sources say they will be extended if a new agreement can't be reached.


Apple currently pays out some of the highest royalty rates with record labels receiving 58 percent of revenue from Apple Music subscribers, but it wants a deal closer to what Spotify recently negotiated. Spotify pays 52 percent of revenue from subscribers, down from an earlier rate of 55 percent.

Spotify's new rate is contingent on subscriber growth, and music labels are said to be open to negotiating a similar deal with Apple. Record labels also want assurances from Apple that iTunes will be promoted in countries like Germany and Japan, where most music is still purchased rather than streamed.
The growth of Apple Music hasn't been as detrimental to iTunes as labels had feared. But record labels are still asking for precautions. Labels have asked Apple to commit to promoting iTunes, and music in general, in countries where streaming isn't as prevalent.
Since its 2015 introduction, Apple Music has seen steady growth, which may give Apple an upper hand when negotiating new deals with labels. As of June 2017, Apple Music has 27 million paying subscribers, up from 20 million in December of 2016.

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32 months ago
I tried to lower my housework responsibilities in an effort to revise my "overall relationship" with my wife. It definitely revised the relationship, but not quite how I wanted.
Rating: 23 Votes
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32 months ago

Chances of Apple passing the savings on to its customers? About 2%.


.2%
Rating: 9 Votes
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32 months ago
If they could negotiate that more of that record company share actually went to the artists, THAT would be a victory.
As it stands. Artists receive 0.000000something%
Unless the revenue distribution is radically challenged, there won't be any new music in the future...
Rating: 9 Votes
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32 months ago
Chances of Apple passing the savings on to its customers? About 2%.
Rating: 6 Votes
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32 months ago

If they could negotiate that more of that record company share actually went to the artists, THAT would be a victory.
As it stands. Artists receive 0.000000something%
Unless the revenue distribution is radically challenged, there won't be any new music in the future...

Lol out of all the doomsayers around here this must be the funniest one I've read in a while.

Will we get less Taylor Swift's ? Maybe. But many many artists create music for other reasons than profit.

I am not saying the current distribution is fair and does not need to get looked at, but to say nobody will make music is not accurate
Rating: 6 Votes
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32 months ago

If they could negotiate that more of that record company share actually went to the artists, THAT would be a victory.
As it stands. Artists receive 0.000000something%
Unless the revenue distribution is radically challenged, there won't be any new music in the future...


Don’t sign ripoff deals with music labels and pocket it all yourself.
Rating: 4 Votes
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32 months ago
You would think with the involvement of Trent Reznor and Dre in Apple Music, there would actually be people looking out for the artists at Apple. Apparently they already got theirs.
Rating: 4 Votes
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32 months ago
$14.99 a month for 5 lines all you can eat is already an astounding deal IMO.
Rating: 4 Votes
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32 months ago
I'd rather see these record labels hammered into the ground and artists sign directly with distribution services like Apple Music where the artist receives 70% cut and Apple receives 30%, similar to the App Store. Right now artists make squat from their own music sales and have to do the exhaustive tour circuit to actually make money. At least in most cases.
Rating: 3 Votes
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32 months ago

Record labels also want assurances from Apple that iTunes will be promoted in countries like Germany and Japan, where most music is still purchased rather than streamed.

Of all the places in the world without popular music streaming services, I'd least suspect Germany and Japan of being guilty.


I recently read that CD's are still the number one way Japanese consume music. From what I read, the reason is that striking digital rights deals are more complicated in Japan. My guess and this is purely a guess, is that Japanese tend to be resistant to change and upper management is probably older and even more resistant to change. So the Japanese don't have the same options as the Americans.

Personally, I still buy CD's because I can own the music instead of renting it under the rubric of a digital purchase that is actually a digital rights license.

These articles of Apple renegotiating these license deals only serves to reinforce my decision to stick to CD's. Because if these negotiations don't go well and you keep your music in the cloud, you can be assured that your music will drift away like a cloud on a windy day.
Rating: 3 Votes
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